2019 Golden Globes Red Carpet and Awards Ceremony

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
Messages
22,075
I am glad Bohemian Rhapsody won and as did Malek. I thought Malek did a fantastic job of portraying Mercury.

As for Black Panther, enjoyable but just another big action film that aims to have as much collateral damage as possible which is where the Marvel and DC movies go these days. It might be a ground breaker in terms of casting and theme, but it is a better technical film than an overall great movie.
 

Parsley Sage

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,529
Well it was the biggest movie of 2018; First film with all major acting categories were played by black people; a black director and a soundtrack that features a nobel prize winner.

Also it is extremely well acted and made film.
Kendrick Lamar is a Pulitzer prize winner.
 

screech

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,096
Just watched the press room interview with Rami, Queen, and the Bohemian Rhapsody Producers (and Mike Myers, who was wearing his Order of Canada medal).

Loved Jim "Miami" Beach's comments on the negative reviews. He reminded people that Queen received some of the worst reviews for their music (then were insanely popular and successful). Their musical opened on the West End to terrible reviews and ran for 12 seasons (he said 16, but according to Wikipedia it was actually 12). No matter the reviews, the public embraces them, and they've (generally) embraced the film.

Also, when asked about Brian Singer, the producers and Rami refused to discuss him, and instead mentioned how the important thing to everyone involved was to tell this story.

I think with how genuine he is, and with how good his speeches are, Rami may have improved his chances for the Oscar. It's still early, but it's seeming like it's between him and Christian Bale. And The Academy LOVES to reward people who change their appearance for a role. And they love biopics, so... Only thing I can really see possibly hurting Rami's chances right now is backlash over Bohemian Rhapsody winning best picture.

After the nominations for the Oscars come out, I'll have to ask my relative who's a voting member of The Academy who he voted for. And also if he has any insider info on voting corruption this year. He told me that the year Heath Ledger won, members were told 'wouldn't it be nice if he won...?' to try to get people to vote for him. Many think he would have won anyway, but apparently there was some push there too.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
21,020
What gets me is that when there's a movie outside of the male framework or white framework, people automatically assume with social media being what it is now, that #oscarsowhite was the only reason a film made and/or centered around POC only got in because of the race or #metoo if it's a female centered film made by a woman (Lady Bird) or whatever now but we had what 80 years of Oscars rewarding certain movies accepted by a membership that's majority white and male above a certain age? They only choose things based on merit? I don't think so.
Your mention of female-centred films made by women brings to mind Frozen River (2009).

It was a wonderful film and I see on IMDB that it did receive a fair bit of acclaim, including Best Woman Director for Courney Hunt. Though I am not sure I agree with having a specific category for 'Woman' director. I understand the rationale for reverse discrimination, but think that female directors are capable enough to compete with male directors.
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
Your mention of female-centred films made by women brings to mind Frozen River (2009).

It was a wonderful film and I see on IMDB that it did receive a fair bit of acclaim, including Best Woman Director for Courney Hunt. Though I am not sure I agree with having a specific category for 'Woman' director. I understand the rationale for reverse discrimination, but think that female directors are capable enough to compete with male directors.
I do too, and cannot wait to see more talent come. Chloe Zhao's The Rider was one of the films that was acclaimed this year. I also saw Tamara Jenkins' Private Life which I felt brought a great new perspective on the troubles of conceiving and not sure how many men would have done a movie like that from that perspective. I remember watching Jenkins' Slums of Beverly Hills like twenty years ago and the themes Natasha Lyone's character deals with and the dialogue she had with Marissa Tomei made me realize how much we need female storytellers because men would never tell a story like that. Josephine Decker's Madeline's Madeline made me so excited to see what this woman has coming up next. That movie really excited me. I haven't seen Lynne Ramsay's You Were Never Really Here but heard wonderful things about it.
 

Nell411

Between the click of the light
Messages
2,551
I've seen it mentioned in a couple of places online that Rami Malek and Bryan Singer were at odds throughout filming before Singer got fired so I imagine he would be fine not answering questions about him. It doesn't change the fact that it's going to keep coming up though and eventually he may have to say something.

Singer is ripe for a Weinstein style take down. It's frustrating that no one seems to be doing anything about it though.
 

screech

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,096
I've seen it mentioned in a couple of places online that Rami Malek and Bryan Singer were at odds throughout filming before Singer got fired so I imagine he would be fine not answering questions about him. It doesn't change the fact that it's going to keep coming up though and eventually he may have to say something.

Singer is ripe for a Weinstein style take down. It's frustrating that no one seems to be doing anything about it though.
Apparently Singer would cry when challenged and hurled equipment across the set (though not at anybody in particular). He was regularly late (really frustrating for those who'd prepared for the shoot and had spent hours in the makeup chair) or just plain absent. Apparently Tom Hollander (who plays "Miami" Beach) was so fed up with Singer that he briefly quit the project. It was apparently after Singer threw the equipment that Rami made a complaint. It seems Rami's issues with Singer were due to his unprofessionalism, though Singer has said his absences were due to family issues.
Though he already had a history of erratic behaviour on set.
And then the rape allegations.

It's no wonder they don't want to talk about him. Dexter Fletcher completed the last few weeks of filming, but apparently the DGA will only allow one director to be attached to a film, which is why Singer has sole directing credit (though Fletcher has been listed as an executive producer). But as for the questions - they want to focus on the film being a passion project (for Singer too), and focus on the positive. It was overall an incredibly positive experience for all involved, and that's what they want to remember and promote.
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
It's been on my mind all day how certain filmographies have been dismissed by people due to the people behind the camera but it seems Bohemian Rhapsody has been granted some sort of pass for it which is surprising considering the serious nature of the Singer allegations (with pictures of him with clearly minor boys surfacing). I wonder if it's because the cast and crew did not get along with him that grants that pass? That he had to leave 3 weeks early making the cast and crew look like some sort of heroes even if the reasons for him leaving were unrelated to the rape allegations and even though they all knew those allegations existed when they happily signed on for the project? Is it because as the Time piece said,

"I don’t feel comfortable with the rumors I’ve heard about Singer. But when I look at Bohemian Rhapsody, I don’t see some pure auteurist vision. I see a creation that works because a bunch of musicians and choreographers, of lighting technicians and camerapeople, of people working above and below the line—including, of course, actors—knew what they were doing and believed in it. You don’t have to like the picture to accept that, like all big-budget movies, it bears the fingerprints of many hands, including that of its director. Film is alchemy. There’s so much that can go wrong, and also a million and one nearly imperceptible elements that have to somehow go right."

Which to me is actually worth a couple of points docked for the artistic merit of the film as it makes it sound like the film could have been directed by anyone. Or is it because people love Queen and love the movie so much they are willing to give the movie a pass while if it's a director/writer you already didn't like or have no strong feelings about or a movie you don't like/have no strong feelings about, it's easier to dismiss the film talk about not being able to separate an artist from the art. I think in one of the movie threads we discussed the difficulty of this for many people as we realize just how pervasive these issues are in the industry that it has affected way more projects than people anticipated and will start affecting projects we like/love. I'm just curious about it because I think it is something worth talking about.
 

allezfred

Baby Jolly Man Face
Staff member
Messages
54,807
A co-worker who is a Queen groupie has been to see “Bohemian Rhapsody” seven times....
 

misskarne

Handy Emergency Backup Mode
Messages
17,812
A co-worker who is a Queen groupie has been to see “Bohemian Rhapsody” seven times....
I've seen people on the internet bragging they've seen it 9 times. I'm waiting for the DVD when I can binge it to my heart's content at no extra cost. Plus the DVD will have all the extra scenes that got cut, including the full Live Aid concert and their Japan tour concert scenes (give us '39 you cowards).

Somewhat miffed that America is getting the DVD before the UK when Queen is a British band.
 

aftershocks

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,833
Kudos to Jeff Bridges! :encore: :cheer2: :40beers: He makes me do a happy dance! He's one of my most favorite, iconic human beings on the planet.
https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2464613/the-jeff-bridges-golden-globes-montage-was-amazing
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AsWQARXR0ig
https://www.cinemablend.com/news/2464678/jeff-bridges-followed-up-his-wild-golden-globes-speech-with-the-perfect-tweet
Jeff has tagged us all to be trim-tabs on our life journey... What an inspiring speech, and what a daunting challenge. As one of my other favorite actors, Sam Elliott, observed in the filmed tribute: 'Jeff makes the difficult look easy.'

Far more than just being the well known, 'Dude' of acting, Jeff comes from such a lovely family, with wonderful parents. His father Lloyd was passionate about acting and about life. Lloyd was a true gentleman and he passed that quality, along with his joy and compassion, on to his sons. Brother Beau Bridges was a heartthrob as a teenager, and he's also a great actor and a kind human being. Their parents were both very good actors, and their mother Dorothy gave up her career to nurture her family: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D5CXEgsnnZI What an amazing Mom! How cool is that!

The greatest lesson Jeff learned from his Dad: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FD5oyoA7IOk
Superstars & Their Moms: a clip probably filmed during the 90s of Jeff and Cindy Bridges with their parents; a great glimpse of a loving, down-to-earth family: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TPGFyV9ctqU

Jeff has worked on humanitarian projects for many years. He puts his money and his actions where his mouth is. His wife, Sue, is his rock. The story of how Jeff and Sue met is very quirky romantic. The revealing details of how they came together, stayed together and built a life together are remarkable and enlightening:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9HYO_7_aK_8
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1b7bur4WT0E
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=li7-mZ3g8Jo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iQ8ZVIWb13E During press conf for SAG Award after he won for Crazy Heart, Jeff called his wife Sue to the microphone to help him answer some questions :)

My favorite Jeff Bridges films include The Last Picture Show*; Starman*; Thunderbolt & Lightfoot; Rancho Deluxe; Jagged Edge; Against All Odds; Fearless*, The Fisher King*; The Fabulous Baker Boys; 8 Million Ways to Die; The Morning After; The Contender; Tron; Crazy Heart (won Oscar); American Heart; True Grit*; The Giver; The Big Lebowski*; Hell or High Water*
For the starred films, I think Jeff should have won the Oscar. He was Oscar-nominated for all of the starred roles except Fisher King (1991), Lebowski (1998), and Fearless (1993) which was a grossly overlooked film. Jeff's work in Fearless was genius, masterful and fearless! Both Jeff and Rosie Perez should have won respectively for Best Actor, and Best Supporting Female Actor (Perez was nominated but did not win). Jeff finally won the Oscar for Crazy Heart at the 2010 awards ceremony.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jeff_Bridges
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_awards_and_nominations_received_by_Jeff_Bridges

Oh poor deprived younger generation who never got to witness the young Jeff Bridges in real time:
https://www.laineygossip.com/old-chris-pine-and-young-jeff-bridges-at-the-2019-golden-globes/51655 :lol:

Purchase a box set of all Jeff's greatest hits, and binge-watch! :watch:
 
Last edited:

aftershocks

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,833
I dont think a movie should win awards based on skin color.
:drama: I wonder why it's not possible to leave skin color out of the equation in the first place? :COP:

Oh well, I guess melanin (the biology of life) can't be ignored as much as the visual optics of mere skin pigmentation should be. DNA technology tells us that variations in skin pigmentation is a miniscule matter in the scheme of biological differentiation. But 500 years of historical myths, misinformation and cultural prejudices is a lot to overcome. Maybe we can trim-tab a bit by expanding our knowledge. Reading Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi, and Origins of the Black Atlantic, edited by Laurent DuBois and Julius S. Scott, I suggest might be an enlightening start.

BTW, everybody has melanin, it's just that some humans have more. https://www2.palomar.edu/anthro/adapt/adapt_4.htm And seriously, having a lot is not really a bad thing, contrary to popular opinion. Melanin is actually more than just pigment, but to understand the truth often requires going beyond status quo knowledge. Biologists and research scientists have been studying the science behind melanin, melatonin, and variations in skin pigmentation for years and trying to wrap their minds around it; a daunting process. Anyhoo, new uses for melanin are constantly being studied:
https://phys.org/news/2016-12-melanin-material-bioelectronic-devices.html

Maybe there's a movie in there somewhere. :watch:

Quite often, the movies and actors who didn't win Golden Globes and Oscars and/or who weren't even nominated are much more interesting than the list of who and what did win.
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
Quite often, the movies and actors who didn't win Golden Globes and Oscars and/or who weren't even nominated are much more interesting than the list of who and what did win.
For the most part my personal favorite film usually does not coincide with the film that won a Best Pic award from either the Globes or Oscar.
 

aftershocks

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,833
Can’t remember him thanking any woman through that speech outside of his wife, and I love Jeff Bridges. Movies have been an old boys network for a very long time and that encapsulated it very well.
Wrong. In addition to his wife, Sue, Jeff also thanked his dearly departed mother Dorothy, his sister Cindy, and his agents and personal staff with at least three of those whom he mentioned by name, being women. Jeff didn't particularly thank co-stars other than Chris Pine who introduced him, and his brother Beau, whom he also credited before the show with teaching him how to act. Jeff mentioned his career-long stand-in who unsurprisingly happens to be male, and several directors who are also male, but it's a safe bet that Jeff worked mainly with a lot of male directors. ;)

There's quite a long list of female actors Jeff has worked with (including Michelle Pfeiffer, Jane Fonda, Rosie Perez, Glenn Close, Karen Allen, Rachel Ward, Jessica Lange, Joan Allen, Hailee Steinfeld, Cybill Shepherd, Rosanna Arquette, Maggie Gyllenhaal, et al). It would have been nice of Jeff to mention some of his female co-stars, but he didn't receive the reward for any one specific film. He's enjoyed a very long career, and he couldn't take up the whole evening. :lol:

In any case, in his opening remarks, Jeff made reference to the fact that there are so many people to thank because filmmaking is a collaborative art. Jeff also has three adult daughters with whom he is very close. At least one of his daughters has worked with him on a few projects. In these award show matters, a lot gets left out. That's the nature of the beast. Jeff at least tried to be uplifting and he definitely showed his passion for being alive, which was all-inclusive and not gender-based. :)
 
Last edited:

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,370
Just based on numbers, it's a good guess that most people's favourite movie of a certain year is not included in the list of nominees. No different when my favourite skater isn't necessarily on the podium at Worlds or Olympics. There is something to be said about a movie that captures the consensus.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Medvedeva, T&M, Shibs, P&C
Messages
47,036
:drama: I wonder why it's not possible to leave skin color out of the equation in the first place? :COP:

Oh well, I guess melanin (the biology of life) can't be ignored as much as the visual optics of mere skin pigmentation should be. DNA technology tells us that variations in skin pigmentation is a miniscule matter in the scheme of biological differentiation. But 500 years of historical myths, misinformation and cultural prejudices is a lot to overcome. Maybe we can trim-tab a bit by expanding our knowledge. Reading Stamped From the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi, and Origins of the Black Atlantic, edited by Laurent DuBois and Julius S. Scott, I suggest might be an enlightening start.

BTW, everybody has melanin, it's just that some humans have more. https://www2.palomar.edu/anthro/adapt/adapt_4.htm And seriously, having a lot is not really a bad thing, contrary to popular opinion. Melanin is actually more than just pigment, but to understand the truth often requires going beyond status quo knowledge. Biologists and research scientists have been studying the science behind melanin, melatonin, and variations in skin pigmentation for years and trying to wrap their minds around it; a daunting process. Anyhoo, new uses for melanin are constantly being studied:
https://phys.org/news/2016-12-melanin-material-bioelectronic-devices.html

Maybe there's a movie in there somewhere. :watch:

Quite often, the movies and actors who didn't win Golden Globes and Oscars and/or who weren't even nominated are much more interesting than the list of who and what did win.
My comment was in response to Topaz’s post number 155 saying that it deserved the BP because (among other things) all actors and one more person were black.

Don’t take my post out of context.
 
Last edited:

MacMadame

Cat Lady-in-Training
Messages
28,749
Which to me is actually worth a couple of points docked for the artistic merit of the film as it makes it sound like the film could have been directed by anyone. Or is it because people love Queen and love the movie so much they are willing to give the movie a pass while if it's a director/writer you already didn't like or have no strong feelings about or a movie you don't like/have no strong feelings about, it's easier to dismiss the film talk about not being able to separate an artist from the art. I think in one of the movie threads we discussed the difficulty of this for many people as we realize just how pervasive these issues are in the industry that it has affected way more projects than people anticipated and will start affecting projects we like/love. I'm just curious about it because I think it is something worth talking about.
Or maybe they haven't heard about it. I think at this point "everyone" has heard about people like Woody Allen, Roman Polanski and Bill Cosby. But this is the first I heard about any issues with the director of Bohemian Rhapsody. (Which I have not seen yet.)

Just based on numbers, it's a good guess that most people's favourite movie of a certain year is not included in the list of nominees.
If we're talking about 2018, Black Panther is on many lists of nominees. :D
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
Or maybe they haven't heard about it. I think at this point "everyone" has heard about people like Woody Allen, Roman Polanski and Bill Cosby. But this is the first I heard about any issues with the director of Bohemian Rhapsody. (Which I have not seen yet.)
But even when being told about it people just brush it off.
 

screech

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,096
But even when being told about it people just brush it off.
With regards to Bohemian Rhapsody, the feeling I get isn't that people are brushing it off, but that people are saying Brian Singer being a complete douche canoe doesn't diminish Rami Malek's performance, or the work of everyone else involved in the film. Nobody is praising the film because of Singer (except Singer).
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
With regards to Bohemian Rhapsody, the feeling I get isn't that people are brushing it off, but that people are saying Brian Singer being a complete douche canoe doesn't diminish Rami Malek's performance, or the work of everyone else involved in the film. Nobody is praising the film because of Singer (except Singer).
And that was the point of my post. It seems sort of selective based on people’s enjoyment of the product. I remember people going nuts about Kevin Spacey and House of Cards when all that stuff came out and all those pieces about whether The Cosby Show should stop running on syndication because it would diminish the good work of the entire team behind it, etc. I think people find it easier to do a hard boycott or ban if they don’t really care about the work of the person who is accused or don’t like it but once it’s something people enjoy they find all kinds of rationale to separate the accused from the work.
 

screech

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,096
And that was the point of my post. It seems sort of selective based on people’s enjoyment of the product. I remember people going nuts about Kevin Spacey and House of Cards when all that stuff came out and all those pieces about whether The Cosby Show should stop running on syndication because it would diminish the good work of the entire team behind it, etc.
House of Cards still went on without Spacey, receiving positive reviews. The Today show continued without Matt Lauer (though with people who'd known of allegations still involved). Actors are still doing Woody Allen and Roman Polanski films. Donald freaking Trump is still President.
People still thinking there's good about BR, despite Singer's involvement, is not as abnormal or selective as it's been made out to be.
(To be clear, I think Bryan Singer is completely despicable and should be punished. Just that Rami and the rest of those involved in BR shouldn't be punished because of him.)
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Medvedeva, T&M, Shibs, P&C
Messages
47,036
But even when being told about it people just brush it off.
I had read about it, but I think we don't hear about it because

1. He was fired before the movie was released
2. AFAIK he has not yet been officially charged
3. He is not as famous as the others you mentioned
4. The cast of BR is not encouraging any discussion.
 

VIETgrlTerifa

Well-Known Member
Messages
29,227
House of Cards still went on without Spacey, receiving positive reviews. The Today show continued without Matt Lauer (though with people who'd known of allegations still involved). Actors are still doing Woody Allen and Roman Polanski films. Donald freaking Trump is still President.
People still thinking there's good about BR, despite Singer's involvement, is not as abnormal or selective as it's been made out to be.
(To be clear, I think Bryan Singer is completely despicable and should be punished. Just that Rami and the rest of those involved in BR shouldn't be punished because of him.)
What about whole filmography of people that people think shouldn't be shown anymore due to the men behind them, i.e. Roman Polanski films and Woody Allen films? People are saying they shouldn't be shown anymore because we really can't separate the work from the artist. That's why I quoted Time Magazine article you linked because the critic there mentioned Bohemian Rhapsody is not the type of film that is so associated with an artist/auteur director because I'm trying to figure out the different treatment. And speaking of Kevin Spacey, he was erased from an entire film that was set to be released and had to be reshot, and people are weary of mentioning him in House of Cards or showing scenes of him in past seasons, etc. So it's like they want to pretend he was never a part of that show when he was a huge part of the success. Is it easier to just take a piece away for some projects and not others?
 

aftershocks

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,833
My comment was in response to Topaz’s post number 155 saying that it deserved the BP because (among other things) all actors and one more person were black.
Don’t take my post out of context.
Reviewing the comments in post #155, I see a fact-based statement from topaz about the cast, director and soundtrack of Black Panther (BP), that was offered in response to peibeck who made equally valid observations regarding comic-book based genre films usually not winning Best Picture.

I don't read topaz' comments as suggesting BP deserved to win on the basis of the cast's skin colors. It's simply that it's generally rare for well-received, produced, directed and acted big budget Hollywood films to employ a cast consisting predominantly of POC. That is an achievement of cultural note and significance because of societal conundrums and contradictions, and because it seems to overcome usual Hollywood industry practices and biases. Actually, BP is not the first film ever made with a predominantly black cast, but surely it's one of the first, and possibly the first to become a huge box office hit.

Still I don't read topaz' below observations as imeaning that's the reason BP should win Best Picture.
Well it was the biggest movie of 2018; First film with all major acting categories were played by black people; a black director and a soundtrack that features a nobel prize winner.
Also it is extremely well acted and made film.
I see the above as a comment about the rarity of such a film with that storyline and cast being produced in Hollywood and well-received worldwide. I haven't yet seen BP, but I do look forward to seeing it as I've heard good things about it. In fact, I've got a lot of catching up to do before Oscar noms are announced. Also, I love the work of Ta-Nehisi Coates (Between the World & Me; The Beautiful Struggle) who wrote the latest comic-book series upon which the film is based, although Coates did not write the BP screenplay.

We all have different likes and dislikes. I generally try to be openminded about film viewing, and I try not to pre-judge what might well be worthwhile whether or not I favor a certain genre. Sometimes viewing a film with pre-conceived judgment, or not viewing it because of pre-conceived judgment makes it difficult to fairly assess or to fully grasp a film's value and nuances. But there's only so much time available, so indeed we all have to make choices about what to read, what movies to see, how we spend our time. ;)

Definitely there's always different strokes for different folks. There's always going to be quality output, or average output, and reasons why we prefer certain films and actors over others. Some years I've liked every actor in a category and wished they all could win. I usually feel more divided about Best Picture and Best Director, and the writing categories. In the end, it's just a big awards party that has professional advantages for those who win, but it's not really a true measure of who or what is best or better than.

There was an article about why movies like Black Panther will have a hard time winning awards versus movies like Hidden Figues. Wish I could find the link.
Thanks. Can you recall the content and summarize? :)
 
Last edited:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top