Movie Awards Season 2018-19 Road to Oscar

Nell411

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I have not read this article but in very old days it was common in India to segregate women who were having a period. Nobody died as a result of segregation. I think similar things were done in some other cultures too, like not going to church, though my sample size is very small in those cases.

The unhealthy things shown in that documentary were did happen (since they showed interviews of locals that said so) and quite possibly caused serious health problems. This does not mean that the whole country is like that, and the viewers need to differentiate between the small rural areas addressed in this documentary and the rest of the country. I have to point this out because there is a tendency to overgeneralize when it comes to developing countries.
I mean I literally said rural areas in my post and it's stated that it's rural areas in the article. But when a 12 year old girl kills herself because a teacher shamed her for a stain on her clothing it's indicative of a pretty serious problem and maybe, just maybe they need to talk about it more. Which this documentary has done for people in this rural region of India, as is stated in the article.
 

Japanfan

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I have not read this article but in very old days it was common in India to segregate women who were having a period. Nobody died as a result of segregation. I think similar things were done in some other cultures too, like not going to church, though my sample size is very small in those cases.
But such segregation is still reflects the stigma regarding menstruation, which is in turn reflective of discrimination against/the oppression of women.

Being forbidden from going into places of worships while menstruating is quite common, SFAIK. It was certainly true of temples in Japan.

I prefer the perspective of indigenous people - well, at least one First Nation that I know of. For this nation, only men had to use the sweat lodge to purify themselves, because women purified themselves through menstruation.

Here's an interesting article about the woman from Period. End of Sentence. Considering girls have died as a result of being "period shamed" and segregated from their families during their periods it's easy to see why any success for this documentary is a good thing for women in rural regions of India.
At least it brings the topic out into the open. But I have to wonder whether any men will even watch it.
 

Vash01

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But such segregation is still reflects the stigma regarding menstruation, which is in turn reflective of discrimination against/the oppression of women.

Being forbidden from going into places of worships while menstruating is quite common, SFAIK. It was certainly true of temples in Japan.

I prefer the perspective of indigenous people - well, at least one First Nation that I know of. For this nation, only men had to use the sweat lodge to purify themselves, because women purified themselves through menstruation.



At least it brings the topic out into the open. But I have to wonder whether any men will even watch it.
The segregation was several decades ago, could be 60-70 years or even longer. The oppression is just one way of oppression of women world wide, including the so called advanced countries. It just takes different forms.

I see a lot of bias here, because you are treating the segregation of women like a current thing.

There were many men in the theater when I saw this documentary.
 

Japanfan

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I see a lot of bias here, because you are treating the segregation of women like a current thing.
Although I preferred to the present tense in my post - because I was referring to the present - I'm well aware that it is not a current thing and has long been the tradition/practice in various societies.

There were many men in the theater when I saw this documentary.
To be more clear, I was wondering specifically about whether the men in the village/region where the film was shot would see it. Not about men in general, or the western male audience.
 

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