Russian women news & updates, 2021-22 season

Ka3sha

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8,579
These screenshots are from Elena Rodina (and I don’t have any words to describe this person as she is a huge fan of Putin and has lists of state traitors such as Medvedeva, Tuktamysheva, Tutberidze, Averbukh and others who did not support the war).
This info doesn’t mean or say anything in particular. Everyone in Russia can get this information from the unified state register of all real estates and different types of properties, if they know details about the owner/property.
Even the price here is not real, it’s a minimal cadastral cost for all apartments in this building. In reality if she really decides to sell it, the cost will be 3 times higher than that.
 
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AxelAnnie

Like a small boat on the ocean...
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14,463
Interesting YouTube about Kostornaia and insights into the Tuberidze training environment.

Korstonaia is my favorite of the Russians. It is horrible that these skaters are not protected. They are national treasures.
 

Cachoo

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9,242
I’m not sure any Olympic medal would be worth that level of toxicity. They truly have no childhood.
 

Bigbird

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2,731
Russia has no interest in nurturing and developing their young talent. They just churn them out, push them until they can't do it and discard them. Imagine how great they could be in a healthy environment?
But did it really
reveal anything new? More disappointing than ET was her mummy dearest.....
 

karmena

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222
I’m not sure any Olympic medal would be worth that level of toxicity. They truly have no childhood.
In my opinion it depends on the coach.

Of course there are many factors but coach's attitude- and coach's personal goals- are crucial, just mho. Tamara Moskvina for example never ever stole a childhood to any of her skaters. She also maintained to them that a good education and other life than skating has to be in harmony and is important.
 

Cachoo

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9,242
Russia has no interest in nurturing and developing their young talent. They just churn them out, push them until they can't do it and discard them. Imagine how great they could be in a healthy environment?
I never thought of Moskvina or Mishin in this way. But man…the things we are learning from those who stay with Eteri for years is alarming and sad.
 

Cachoo

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9,242
In my opinion it depends on the coach.

Of course there are many factors but coach's attitude- and coach's personal goals- are crucial, just mho. Tamara Moskvina for example never ever stole a childhood to any of her skaters. She also maintained to them that a good education and other life than skating has to be in harmony and is important.
I was posting at the same time. It is important to distinguish between the good and the bad.
 

coppertop1

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1,543
I never thought of Moskvina or Mishin in this way. But man…the things we are learning from those who stay with Eteri for years is alarming and sad.
I think Mishin has mellowed over the years. Remember Yagudin cheering when Plushenko fell? I don't think things have been always been rosy with him. However, Tuktamysheva has done well under him and she also looks like a healthy young woman. I think Moskvina has always been a good coach. I remember her trying to straighten out Oleg Shliakhov.

Tutberidze on the other hand. . .yikes.
 

karmena

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222
But did it really
reveal anything new? More disappointing than ET was her mummy dearest.....
IMO Eteri was a voluntary tool in the hands of the system and I would not call her even a coach. Her goals were not the development of her skaters individuality or beauty of skating.

I would say...she rather (almost) succeeded to kill the soul of women figure skating. Though it is only my persona opinion.
 

coppertop1

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1,543
IMO Eteri was a voluntary tool in the hands of the system and I would not call her even a coach. Her goals were not the development of her skaters individuality or beauty of skating.

I would say...she rather (almost) succeeded to kill the soul of women figure skating. Though it is only my persona opinion.
Oh come on, she was coach of the year, remember 🙄? Yeah...about that.

The way she trains and churns out these girls is like a factory. They're not meant to last, they're replaceable.
 

karmena

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222
Oh come on, she was coach of the year, remember 🙄? Yeah...about that.

The way she trains and churns out these girls is like a factory. They're not meant to last, they're replaceable.
Good for her. Of course, I do remember. However, it does not change my opinion for what i said, and not at all.
 

Hedwig

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20,285
Is the translation somewhere written down? I cannot listen to things well in general vs reading and the voice of the video is especially difficult.
 

soogar

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3,080
I think Mishin has mellowed over the years. Remember Yagudin cheering when Plushenko fell? I don't think things have been always been rosy with him. However, Tuktamysheva has done well under him and she also looks like a healthy young woman. I think Moskvina has always been a good coach. I remember her trying to straighten out Oleg Shliakhov.

Tutberidze on the other hand. . .yikes.
I think Mishin has a soft spot for women. For the longest time he never trained them and then as he grew older, he took on women. In his heyday, he had a similar approach like Eteri where he pitted rivals against one another. The atmosphere was very toxic between Yagudin and Plushenko. What happened with Artur Gachinsky? He was like mini Plush but it looked like his career crashed and burned under Mishin.
 

greenapple

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Messages
990
I think Mishin has a soft spot for women. For the longest time he never trained them and then as he grew older, he took on women. In his heyday, he had a similar approach like Eteri where he pitted rivals against one another. The atmosphere was very toxic between Yagudin and Plushenko. What happened with Artur Gachinsky? He was like mini Plush but it looked like his career crashed and burned under Mishin.
Mishin wrote about both these situations in his autobiography "Secrets of the Ice" and explained in depth what transpired in both cases.

"Two cocky, adolescent boys such as Yagudin and Plushenko were hungry for victories in the difficult 1990s. Needless to say their
relationship deteriorated during the 1998 Olympic season. This was Plushenko’s first full-fledged senior season; he had already performed on the Grand Prix stages, entered the ranks of the strongest and began to claim trips to the main competitions, including the Olympics. However, the feeling of jealousy for Plushenko created in Yagudin an almost imperceptible distrust of my actions and decisions.

Never, in all the years of my work with them, had I ever thought of drowning Yagudin for Plushenko’s sake. Since two of my athletes qualified for the 1998 Olympic ticket, I was given the opportunity to decide which one of them should go to Nagano. Piseev, the then president of the figure skating federation, unequivocally spoke in favor of Plushenko’s candidacy. But I decided to let whoever won the European Championships go to the Games."

"Artur Gachinski, it seems to me, also did not show the world everything of which he was capable. He was an absolutely amazing figure skater from an artistic point of view and had a very high technical potential.

There was no doubt that he was one of the most likely candidates to take the throne after Evgeni Plushenko. But, following Artur’s most successful season, when he won the bronze medal at the 2011 World Championships and silver at the 2012 European Championships, something was irrevocably gone. A psychological breakdown occurred, which radically influenced his results. A little devil took over, which could not be expelled. We can say that his fate became tragic.

An event had transpired in the life of the young man, which I would describe as a disease called “love.” His passion turned out to be a teammate, an attractive girl. As a true man, he tried to spend as much time as possible with his girlfriend. But the love relationship of my students was not very successful and the version of “Montague and Capulet” finally destroyed his psyche. All this was accompanied by severe weight gain caused by frequent restaurant visits."
 
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AxelAnnie

Like a small boat on the ocean...
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14,463
Russia has no interest in nurturing and developing their young talent. They just churn them out, push them until they can't do it and discard them. Imagine how great they could be in a healthy environment?
I can see that. Question: Was Russian skating always churn 'em out and dump them where you are done?
It would seem that Moskvina (goddess of all thing) never engages in that kind kind of thing?
 

coppertop1

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1,543
I think Mishin has a soft spot for women. For the longest time he never trained them and then as he grew older, he took on women. In his heyday, he had a similar approach like Eteri where he pitted rivals against one another. The atmosphere was very toxic between Yagudin and Plushenko. What happened with Artur Gachinsky? He was like mini Plush but it looked like his career crashed and burned under Mishin.
I remember that Mishin coached Elena Sokolova briefly. He also coached Carolina Kostner when she returned to competition. Its crazy that Liza is the only woman single skater in Russia over 20.

I remember Gacinski. It looked like he could be the Next One for Russia but his medal was a one off.
 

coppertop1

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1,543
I can see that. Question: Was Russian skating always churn 'em out and dump them where you are done?
It would seem that Moskvina (goddess of all thing) never engages in that kind kind of thing?
Not always. Before Russia became a monopoly for the women, the woman actually had long careers. Men's was never like that.
 

caseyedwards

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17,651
You have to factor in figures and 6.0! That didn’t lend itself so much for churning and dropping. Though you do have the 3 year career of Tara lipinski which was a true anomaly. After sokolova retired or was forced out Russia had to change its rules so that senior womens nationals could have 12 year olds and over because the standard was so embarrassingly low. And 12 year olds can be flash in the pans. And they never changed the rules back: 12 to 15 or 13 to 16 that’s a lipinski career

Everyone seems to want every woman’s career to last as long as Michelle Kwans
 
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