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aftershocks

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^^ Witnessing history. :) So many transitions are happening these days.

I see you mentioned that the old building was sold and they are temporarily leasing there until the new facility is ready. So will the old building with all of its history remain as a recreational skating facility? Hopefully, it won't ever be torn down (fingers-crossed).

I can't imagine how the club and its members were existing at the 80-year-old rink with only one ice surface for so long, especially with the current demands the sport places on its athletes. But it makes sense that the club's officials realized they'd have to find new property to build on as far back as the late 1990s. I guess it took time for them to raise funds, conduct long-term planning, find architects and builders, and above all locate the right property. Over a period of 20 years of planning and preparing, it's no wonder the cost of space in Boston skyrocketed.

Norwood is close enough to Boston for the facility to still be called, The Skating Club of Boston. If they are just now breaking ground, it will be something if the facility is completed next summer. But I guess if they have a good construction crew and the weather cooperates, it will all work out.
 
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^^ Witnessing history. :) So many transitions are happening these days.

I see you mentioned that the old building was sold and they are temporarily leasing there until the new facility is ready. So will the old building with all of its history remain as a recreational skating facility? Hopefully, it won't ever be torn down (fingers-crossed).
@aftershocks, I am not sure what will happen to the old building after the move. That is a good question. If I hear anything, I will let you know. I agree it would be a shame if it is lost, with all that history!

I can't imagine how the club and its members were existing at the 80-year-old rink with only one ice surface for so long, especially with the current demands the sport places on its athletes. But it makes sense that the club's officials realized they'd have to find new property to build on as far back as the late 1990s. I guess it took time for them to raise funds, conduct long-term planning, find architects and builders, and above all locate the right property. Over a period of 20 years of planning and preparing, it's no wonder the cost of space in Boston skyrocketed.
My understanding is that during that 20 years, the Club had several "near misses" where they thought they had property lined up, and perhaps even signed intent agreements of some sort, but then things fell through. At one point, I believe they had plans to build in Allston, which is like a neighborhood of Boston, but that fell through. And there was a previous deal in Norwood that fell apart, before the current plan took shape. So it has been a journey.
 

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