Let's Talk Movies #36 - 2020 - Yep it is a new decade

PeterG

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I definitely recommend the 2017 documentary Miss Kiet’s Children. It’s about elementary school children in a Dutch classroom for immigrant children, many who have come from war-torn countries (Syria in particular). The movie is quiet and calmer than I expected considering where the children have come from, but the movie is never boring. I found the children to be ADORABLE and it made me think I couldn’t teach young children because it would be too hard to say goodbye to them as they moved to other grades or schools. That’s how sweet these kids are! Not that there isn’t struggle, there is, which the teacher deals with quite well. I really liked this one.

Trailer for Miss Kiet’s Children: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2PyDMkIouOY
 

PeterG

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My next Elvis film is Jailhouse Rock, his third feature film. I was surprised how similar his character was to the one he played in Kid Creole. But this character is even more sullen and nasty. One of the most unlikeable characters I’ve seen in a movie for quite a while. So surprising to see Elvis pick a role that didn’t make him either the hero or at the very least, heroic. Instead, he’s a selfish brat for almost the entire length of the movie. He plays a kid from the wrong side of the tracks who does some jail time and then tries to make a living as a singer. He finds fame but not much else. The musical performances are top-notch and Elvis is great on screen. But I’m ready to see him play somebody likeable now. I guess that’s what all his later 60’s film roles were, even if the quality of those movies decreased with each release.

Trailer for Jailhouse Rock: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jewUhkkGZf0

@Japanfan - didn't you post about re-watching a bunch of Elvis movies a while back? I looked through this and the previous movie thread, but couldn't find your posts there.
 

watchthis!!

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1,689
I had a great night yesterday watching the concert film “Kenny Rogers: All In For The Gambler – All-Star Concert Celebration".

It was filmed in 2017 as Rogers was about to retire (he passed away in 2020). All of the tribute performances are fantastic.

The line-up includes Wynonna Judd, Chris Stapleton, Idina Menzel, Lady A, Lionel Richie, Little Big Town and many more.
And the finale has two Kenny/Dolly Parton duets and a Dolly solo to Kenny of her most famous song. The two of them chat a lot during their time on stage (well, mostly Dolly chatting :lol:) She represents well the love that everyone preceding her on the stage had for Rogers. If you’re a fan of Rogers or country music, you won’t want to miss this one.
 

PeterG

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Mid-way through the movie I thought, "I think I've seen this". I jumped ahead to the ending, and sure enough I realized that I had watched "The Heiress" before. And then I jumped right back to the where I had left off and watched every minute of this incredible movie. Olivia de Havilland won both the Oscar and the Golden Globe for her performance. Deservedly so. The Heiress is a 1949 movie about an unmarried (and wealthy) woman in New York City in the 1840's. This movie is based on a Broadway play, which is based on the novel Washington Square by Henry James. The Heiress is so good, I am wondering if I should read Washington Square (I hardly ever read novels). And I can only imagine how amazing this story would be to see performed live.

But this movie is so good that even after seeing it twice now, I would definitely watch it again. A classic to watch with others and be enthralled by as a group. There is a lot that could be said about the story...but shouldn't. But I can say that de Havilland plays a woman from a wealthy family is very shy and awkward and therefore is finding it difficult to find a mate. Enter Montgomery Clift. I won't say more as to not spoil things but WHAT A SCRIPT! And Ralph Richardson is so good as de Havilland's father. Richardson was Oscar-nominated for his performance in this movie and received a second Oscar nomination as well...thirty five years later! (For Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes.) Miriam Hopkins rounds out the cast as de Havilland's aunt and is equal to the talents of the rest of the cast.

The Heiress is a must-see movie.

Trailer for The Heiress: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQNM6jtRqLg
 

emason

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4,577
As much as de Havilland gets the praise and the Oscar, it’s Montgomery Clift’s performance that blows me away. He’s just ambiguous enough that you wonder does he, doesn’t he.
 

PeterG

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As much as de Havilland gets the praise and the Oscar, it’s Montgomery Clift’s performance that blows me away. He’s just ambiguous enough that you wonder does he, doesn’t he.

I'm still wondering!! Well...95% wondering... :shuffle:
 

watchthis!!

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1,689
Don’t Talk To Irene is not a big budget movie, but it is big in heart. Newcomer Michelle McLeod stars as Irene, an awkward, overweight high school student who wants to be a cheerleader. A nasty prank results in Irene being suspended from school for two weeks and made to volunteer in an old folks home. Irene doesn’t see any reason why the elder folk shouldn’t have goals as well as fun, especially if they happen at the same time. Don’t Talk To Irene is light in tone in spite of how I’m describing it. 😊 Lucky for the movie and for us, Geena Davis plays Irene’s mentor/God and Scott Thompson (Kids In The Hall) runs the seniors home. An extra bonus is the movie featuring some great 90’s pop songs. :respec:
 

Jay42

Between the click of the light
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4,157
Mid-way through the movie I thought, "I think I've seen this". I jumped ahead to the ending, and sure enough I realized that I had watched "The Heiress" before. And then I jumped right back to the where I had left off and watched every minute of this incredible movie. Olivia de Havilland won both the Oscar and the Golden Globe for her performance. Deservedly so. The Heiress is a 1949 movie about an unmarried (and wealthy) woman in New York City in the 1840's. This movie is based on a Broadway play, which is based on the novel Washington Square by Henry James. The Heiress is so good, I am wondering if I should read Washington Square (I hardly ever read novels). And I can only imagine how amazing this story would be to see performed live.

But this movie is so good that even after seeing it twice now, I would definitely watch it again. A classic to watch with others and be enthralled by as a group. There is a lot that could be said about the story...but shouldn't. But I can say that de Havilland plays a woman from a wealthy family is very shy and awkward and therefore is finding it difficult to find a mate. Enter Montgomery Clift. I won't say more as to not spoil things but WHAT A SCRIPT! And Ralph Richardson is so good as de Havilland's father. Richardson was Oscar-nominated for his performance in this movie and received a second Oscar nomination as well...thirty five years later! (For Greystoke: The Legend of Tarzan, Lord of the Apes.) Miriam Hopkins rounds out the cast as de Havilland's aunt and is equal to the talents of the rest of the cast.

The Heiress is a must-see movie.

Trailer for The Heiress: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QQNM6jtRqLg
I watched it last year on TCM and was blown away at how good of a movie it is. Montgomery Clift definitely should have had Oscar consideration along with Olivia de Havilland.
 

VGThuy

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39,960
I watched it last year on TCM and was blown away at how good of a movie it is. Montgomery Clift definitely should have had Oscar consideration along with Olivia de Havilland.
LOVE LOVE LOVE THIS MOVIE.

Also...we have this to thank for the song "Fools Rush In":


I just love that scene so much. There's so much going on with de Havilland's "Catherine" in just this bit. She's smart and quick but so desperate for actual love...here, in a quick moment, you see just how disturbed she was by the song's lyrics but she ends up disregarding her initial correct feelings because she wanted to so believe he was serenading her with a "sweet" love song.
 

screech

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I watched Weird: The Al Yankovic Story last night. It was definitely entertaining. The best thing is that it's played straight, which makes things even funnier. Daniel Radcliffe was brilliant as Al, and Evan Rachel Wood was fantastic as Madonna.

Disappointing that Roku is refusing to release it in even one theatre, meaning that it's ineligible for Oscars consideration (some have Said Dan's performance would be worthy of consideration for a nomination). Roku's reasoning is that they are primarily a TV streaming service, so they'd rather have it be eligible for Emmys. I just hope that it's not forgotten about in the 9 months before the nominations are announced.
 

VGThuy

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39,960
I watched Weird: The Al Yankovic Story last night. It was definitely entertaining. The best thing is that it's played straight, which makes things even funnier. Daniel Radcliffe was brilliant as Al, and Evan Rachel Wood was fantastic as Madonna.

Disappointing that Roku is refusing to release it in even one theatre, meaning that it's ineligible for Oscars consideration (some have Said Dan's performance would be worthy of consideration for a nomination). Roku's reasoning is that they are primarily a TV streaming service, so they'd rather have it be eligible for Emmys. I just hope that it's not forgotten about in the 9 months before the nominations are announced.
It'll probably have a much easier shot winning Emmys though.
 

screech

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7,104
It'll probably have a much easier shot winning Emmys though.
The downside is that a TV movie is also up against miniseries. And comedies, even with fantastic performances, are usually bypassed in favour of dramas.
IMO if it was going to be eligible only for Emmys and not Oscars consideration, they should have waited to release it in the spring, when it's fresher in the minds of those choosing the nominations. Apparently Weird Al was begging Roku, even up to the day of release, to show it in just one single theatre in LA for a week, which would have made it eligible for Oscars consideration (though likely it would have been overlooked there too). His new song over the end credits even references how the song is Oscar eligible.
 

alexikeguchi

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1,093
Just saw Wakanda Forever and LOVED it! The whole theme of the movie is about dealing with grief and loss. So there maybe more drama in this one than some might expect but it is a great movie! :cheer2:
I just got back from watching it as well and also really enjoyed it. There's amazing action for the people who want that, but I really appreciated the drama component. The story was interesting and well-paced, and the acting was excellent. The events are fantastical of course, but the characters, even the villains, had genuine emotions and were not simply cartoons. For anyone who goes to see it, stay through the first part of the credits for a truly satisfying final scene.
 

Aussie Willy

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I watched Weird: The Al Yankovic Story last night. It was definitely entertaining. The best thing is that it's played straight, which makes things even funnier. Daniel Radcliffe was brilliant as Al, and Evan Rachel Wood was fantastic as Madonna.

Disappointing that Roku is refusing to release it in even one theatre, meaning that it's ineligible for Oscars consideration (some have Said Dan's performance would be worthy of consideration for a nomination). Roku's reasoning is that they are primarily a TV streaming service, so they'd rather have it be eligible for Emmys. I just hope that it's not forgotten about in the 9 months before the nominations are announced.
I just checked. We cannot watch this in Australia unless you torrent it. Roku have not made any arrangements with any streaming services in Australia to be able to show it.
 

watchthis!!

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I enjoyed Resident Evil: The Final Chapter. I’m not sure why critics have dumped on this movie series when Marvel movies get a pass. They’re all basically on the same level as far as movies go. I wonder if there’s still a problem for some with women being the lead characters, with these women being strong and self-sufficient. And the women being the heroes of these stories. On the DVD for this movie, one of the extras is about the trio of women at the heart of this movie and how this series is the longest running female-led action movie series. I have enjoyed all of the Resident Evil movies enough that I would like to re-watch all six movies at some point and see more clearly how they are all connected now that I know the whole picture of this series.

As for this final chapter, there is a lot of action and an interesting story – especially with this being the final installment and all the pieces being tied together. Lots of good special effects and Milla Jovovich does another great job of carrying this movie. Nice to see Ali Larter back fighting with Milla. My last thought is how this series costs just over 300 million to make and the revenue for the six movies is just under 1.3 billion. Who says action movies with a female lead can’t make money?
 

Tesla

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Surprisingly, I liked the first Resident Evil movie. I haven’t seen the others. I don’t know if I can watch them now because I'm way more emotional now after having my second child and I need happy endings.
 

PeterG

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I am looking over one of those random Facebook articles showing up on my feed tonight. The article is called, "Film Critics Say These Are The Best Movies Of All Time". How many of them have you seen?

Brief Encounter (1945 - David Lean, director - based on a Noel Coward play)

The Hurt Locker (2009, won six Oscars)

My Fair Lady (1964)

Toy Story (1995)

The Bride Of Frankenstein (1935, starring Boris Karloff)

Beauty And The Best (1991)

Parasite (2019, won four Oscars)

The Grapes Of Wrath (1940, Henry Fonda - won two Oscars, nominated for five more)

Spirited Away (2002, won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature)

Gravity (2013, won seven [technical] Oscars)

Fantasia (1940, Disney animated movie that won two Honorary Oscars)

Mean Streets (1973, starring Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel)

The Lady Eve (1941, starring Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda and Charles Coburn)

Ratatouille (2007, won best Animated Feature Oscar, nominated for four more)

Nashville (1975, Robert Altman director, nominated for five Oscars - winning Best Song for "I'm Easy")

12 Years A Slave (2013, won three Oscars, nominated for six more)

The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston director and starring Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre)

Manchester By The Sea (2016, starring Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams and Kyle Chandler)

12 Angry Men (1957, starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb and Martin Balsam)

Rosemary's Baby (1968, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes and Ruth Gordon)

The Shop Around The Corner (1940, James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan - re-made in 1949 as the Judy Garland musical, In the Good Old Summertime and again in 1998 as You've Got Mail starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan)

American Graffitti (1973, starring Richard Dreyfuss and Ron Howard)

Dumbo (1941)

Dr. Strangelove (1964, Stanley Kubrick director - starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott)

My Left Foot (1990, won two Oscars and starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Brenda Fricker)

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, starring Vivien Leigh and Marlon Brando - won four Oscars, nominated for eight more)

Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock director - starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh and Vera Miles)

The Wild Bunch (1969, starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine)

The Third Man (1949, starring Orson Welles and Joseph Cotten)

Hoop Dreams (1994, Oscar-nominated for Film Editing, but not best documentary)

All About Eve (1950, won six Oscars, but no nominations for stars Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Celeste Holm, Marilyn Monroe or Thelma Ritter)

Pan's Labyrinth (2006, Guillermo del Toro director, won three Oscars)

North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock director and starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason)

Gone With The Wind (1940)

Moonlight (2016, starring Mahershala Ali and Naomie Harris and won three Oscars)

City Lights (1931, Charlie Chaplin)

Some Like It Hot (1959, starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon)

The Treasure of the Sierra Made (1948, won three Oscars, John Huston director and starring Humphrey Bogart and Walter Huston)

The Lady Vanishes (1938, Alfred Hitchcock direcor and starring Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave)

Touch Of Evil (1958, Orson Welles directs and stars alongside Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh)

Pinocchio (1940, won Oscars for Original Score and the song When You Wish Upon A Star)

Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffith director and starring Lillian Gish)

Singin' In The Rain (1952)

Notorious (1946)

Vertigo (1948)

Boyhood (2014)

Casablanca (1943)

Rear Window (1954)

The Godfather (1972)

Citizen Kane (1941)
 
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Jay42

Between the click of the light
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4,157
I am looking over one of those random Facebook articles showing up on my feed tonight. The article is called, "Film Critics Say These Are The Best Movies Of All Time". How many of them have you seen?

Brief Encounter (1945 - David Lean, director - based on a Noel Coward play)

The Hurt Locker (2009, won six Oscars)

My Fair Lady (1964)

Toy Story (1995)


The Bride Of Frankenstein (1935, starring Boris Karloff)

Beauty And The Best (1991)

Parasite (2019, won four Oscars)

The Grapes Of Wrath (1940, Henry Fonda - won two Oscars, nominated for five more)

Spirited Away (2002, won the Oscar for Best Animated Feature)

Gravity (2013, won seven [technical] Oscars)

Fantasia (1940, Disney animated movie that won two Honorary Oscars)

Mean Streets (1973, starring Robert De Niro and Harvey Keitel)

The Lady Eve (1941, starring Barbara Stanwyck, Henry Fonda and Charles Coburn)

Ratatouille (2007, won best Animated Feature Oscar, nominated for four more)

Nashville (1975, Robert Altman director, nominated for five Oscars - winning Best Song for "I'm Easy")

12 Years A Slave (2013, won three Oscars, nominated for six more)

The Maltese Falcon (1941, John Huston director and starring Humphrey Bogart and Peter Lorre)

Manchester By The Sea (2016, starring Casey Affleck, Michelle Williams and Kyle Chandler)

12 Angry Men (1957, starring Henry Fonda, Lee J. Cobb and Martin Balsam)

Rosemary's Baby (1968, starring Mia Farrow, John Cassavetes and Ruth Gordon)

The Shop Around The Corner (1940, James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan - re-made in 1949 as the Judy Garland musical, In the Good Old Summertime and again in 1998 as You've Got Mail starring Tom Hanks and Meg Ryan)

American Graffitti (1973, starring Richard Dreyfuss and Ron Howard)

Dumbo (1941)

Dr. Strangelove (1964, Stanley Kubrick director - starring Peter Sellers and George C. Scott)


My Left Foot (1990, won two Oscars and starring Daniel Day-Lewis and Brenda Fricker)

A Streetcar Named Desire (1951, starring Vivien Leigh and Marlon Brando - won four Oscars, nominated for eight more)

Psycho (1960, Alfred Hitchcock director - starring Anthony Perkins, Janet Leigh and Vera Miles)

The Wild Bunch (1969, starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine)

The Third Man (1949, starring Orson Welles and Joseph Cotten)

Hoop Dreams (1994, Oscar-nominated for Film Editing, but not best documentary)

All About Eve (1950, won six Oscars, but no nominations for stars Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Celeste Holm, Marilyn Monroe or Thelma Ritter)

Pan's Labyrinth (2006, Guillermo del Toro director, won three Oscars)

North by Northwest (1959, Alfred Hitchcock director and starring Cary Grant, Eva Marie Saint and James Mason)

Gone With The Wind (1940)

Moonlight (2016, starring Mahershala Ali and Naomie Harris and won three Oscars)

City Lights (1931, Charlie Chaplin)

Some Like It Hot (1959, starring Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon)

The Treasure of the Sierra Made (1948, won three Oscars, John Huston director and starring Humphrey Bogart and Walter Huston)


The Lady Vanishes (1938, Alfred Hitchcock direcor and starring Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave)

Touch Of Evil (1958, Orson Welles directs and stars alongside Charlton Heston and Janet Leigh)

Pinocchio (1940, won Oscars for Original Score and the song When You Wish Upon A Star)

Intolerance (1916, D.W. Griffith director and starring Lillian Gish)

Singin' In The Rain (1952)

Notorious (1946)

Vertigo (1948)


Boyhood (2014)

Casablanca (1943)

Rear Window (1954)


The Godfather (1972)

Citizen Kane (1941)
I've seen 22 of them. I have The Third Man and Touch of Evil sitting on my parents PVR from TCM to watch as well I just haven't gotten around to them yet. I have a lot of movies from TCM sitting on my parents PVR :lol:. Anyway I went through the quote and bolded the ones I've seen because it felt easier than typing them out.
 

Cachoo

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I've not seen Parasite yet...also Touch of Evil, Intolerance. Spirited Away and I KNOW I saw The Treasure of the Sierra Madre as a kid but I'll be darned if I can remember anything about it. That list seems rather random but I suppose any list of the "greatest of all time" might feel that way. My list is not your list is not his list or her list....
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
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52,292
That list seems rather random
There are some really good movies on there and there is ... Dumbo. (And others like that.)

There are 23 that I've definitely seen and remember and another 5 that I think I've probably seen but when I was in Elementary school and don't quite remember.
 

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