Let's Talk Movies #36 - 2020 - Yep it is a new decade

PeterG

Well-Known Member
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13,270
I've seen forty of those. Do you know who compiled that list?

Sorry, I didn't look. It was just one of those things on facebook that I usually ignore, but this time I gave in and clicked where I normally do not click. :lol: I'll look on facebook again, but I doubt it will show up again. It will just be replaced with a new bunch of clickbait options. :D

P.S. There was another one of the 25 best written songs ever that I clicked on, but it was one where you have to scroll down and click next to see the next song every time. I know that's just to get us to see even more advertisements than normal, so I closed that one quickly.
 

VALuvsMKwan

Wandering Goy
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8,240
"All About Eve (1950, won six Oscars, but no nominations for stars Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Celeste Holm, Marilyn Monroe or Thelma Ritter)"

Each of these actresses except for Marilyn Monroe was indeed nominated - Bette Davis and Anne Baxter for Best Actress, Celeste Holm and Thelma Ritter for Best Supporting Actress. George Sanders won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for the role of Addison DeWitt.

 

PeterG

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13,270
"All About Eve (1950, won six Oscars, but no nominations for stars Bette Davis, Anne Baxter, Celeste Holm, Marilyn Monroe or Thelma Ritter)"

Each of these actresses except for Marilyn Monroe was indeed nominated - Bette Davis and Anne Baxter for Best Actress, Celeste Holm and Thelma Ritter for Best Supporting Actress. George Sanders won the Best Supporting Actor Oscar for the role of Addison DeWitt.

Oops. Didn't scroll down far enough. You can tell by the end of my post that I was worn out, not including any extra info for the movies because I just wanted to get to the end of that darned list!! :lol:
 

Davy88gtbwxyc

Active Member
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41
"Brooklyn's Finest" was a good movie to watch with some great actors.

Something that really struck me about this movie was how real and life-like it was.

I only recall seeing a few movies with Richard Gere, and I'd say that this one is my favorite.

The movie took us on grim ride through some of the roughest parts of town and concluded with a satisfying ending that I appreciated.
 

Davy88gtbwxyc

Active Member
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41
"Frank Serpico" was an inspiring documentary that highlighted one man's heroic efforts to bring about reform amongst a corrupted police force in New York City in the 1970's.

I found it to be rather impressive how someone could take on such a friction inducing task amongst fellow members of the force with a firm willingness to do so and in spite of all the arduous hardship involved, which is a testament to his (Frank Serpico's) admirable strength of character.
 

Yehudi

Tortilla Deliciosa
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4,836
The Menu is the definitive satire of 2022 that skewers consumerism, privilege, modern art discourse, and work place culture (one can see a lot of Elon Musk in Fiennes’ character). I think I’ll watch it again at an Alamo Drafthouse, making sure to order a cheeseburger.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
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52,292
Just came back from watching Wakanda Forever. I love this movie so much! I don't think I've ever cried so much at a superhero movie. Plus, as a woman in STEM starting before it was even called that, I find watching these young girls so confidently being in charge of labs, creating tech, and people not being condescending to them but treating this as normal is really inspiring.

I'm now ready to watch anything Ryan Coogler has done.
 

Buzz

Socialist Canada
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36,372
Actor Chris Hemsworth says he is taking a break from acting after learning of his risk of developing Alzheimer’s. His health must come first. Many thanks to him for giving us MCU fans so many years of fun. Good luck to him.
 

watchthis!!

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,689
"Brooklyn's Finest" was a good movie to watch with some great actors.

Something that really struck me about this movie was how real and life-like it was.

I only recall seeing a few movies with Richard Gere, and I'd say that this one is my favorite.

The movie took us on grim ride through some of the roughest parts of town and concluded with a satisfying ending that I appreciated.

I'm not sure why this movie wasn't a bigger success than it was. It was directed by Antoine Fuqua, who had previously directed Training Day and went on to direct Bullet Train, The Equalizer and Southpaw. Plus the cast! Along with Gere, we get Don Cheadle, Ethan Hawke, Ellen Barkin, Wesley Snipes, Will Patton, Lili Taylor, Jesse Williams and Vincent D'Onofrio. So much talent for one movie! :respec:
 

VGThuy

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That reminds me of some of the vocal self-identified white Mexican actors’ reaction to Yalitza Aparicio’s Oscar nomination.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
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52,292
That reminds me of some of the vocal self-identified white Mexican actors’ reaction to Yalitza Aparicio’s Oscar nomination.
These people always say the same thing. Like in the article when someone said this with a straight face;
“The only thing they achieve is to separate people more,” said host Vaitiare Mateos in Spanish. “The people in a production must be selected for their talent and not for their skin color.”
Because a darker-skinned person couldn't possibly have been cast because they were the best person for the job. It has to be because of some "woke" quota. :rolleyes:

It's particularly ridiculous to make this complaint about Wakanda Forever where the characters we are talking about are descended from Indigeousness people and never mixed because they were a secret society living in the ocean. To cast a white person in those roles would be like when Tilda Swinton was cast as the Ancient One in the MCU. Or, depending on who they cast, like casting Mickey Rooney as Mr. Yunioshi in Breakfast at Tiffany's.
 

alexikeguchi

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1,093
The Menu is the definitive satire of 2022 that skewers consumerism, privilege, modern art discourse, and work place culture (one can see a lot of Elon Musk in Fiennes’ character).
I just saw Glass Onion: A Knives Out Mystery in its short theatrical run, and it is a sendup of the exact same things but with a lighter tone. I feel like the antagonist is directly modeled on Elon Musk. I really enjoyed the movie and thought it was extremely well crafted and well acted.
 

PeterG

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13,270
Wakanda Forever has raised a debate over colourism.

From the article:

“The only thing they achieve is to separate people more,” said host Vaitiare Mateos in Spanish. “The people in a production must be selected for their talent and not for their skin color.”

So how am I wrong that when I read this, it sounds like Mateos thinks that Tenoch Huerta Mejía was chosen because of his darker skin colour and not because of his talent? If I am not wrong to assume this, why doesn't she continue to educate us as to which actors would have out-performed him in this role?
 

Jay42

Between the click of the light
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4,157
From the article:



So how am I wrong that when I read this, it sounds like Mateos thinks that Tenoch Huerta Mejía was chosen because of his darker skin colour and not because of his talent? If I am not wrong to assume this, why doesn't she continue to educate us as to which actors would have out-performed him in this role?
People always say that when they're mad that someone with darker skin gets cast in something. The thing is technically technically they aren't wrong. But because of how they are presenting their opinion they make it wrong. I have my issues with Marvel but casting has never been one of them.

Outside of Benedict Cumberbatch as Doctor Strange but that's a me thing. I can acknowledge he's good in the part, I just find him boring.
 

VGThuy

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39,960
I think a lot of white or light-skinned actors are finally facing a reality that most BIPOC actors have faced their entire lives…that there are a lot of roles they aren’t entitled to even be considered or to audition for because the role will require physical attributes that they don’t possess. It is already tough being a working actor and having to audition and compete for roles constantly and decisions were made based off of things mostly beyond your control, but now the thinking is changing from before when “white” was seen as the default and this it seemed like they could go for like 98% of roles…now it’s like 88-90% (I’m being generous here), and they are raising a fuss. Sound familiar?

Also, hit people where it hurts (their wallets), and we’ll start seeing some “true” feelings about race and color issues come out. It’s never pretty no matter how that person was before.
 

PeterG

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13,270
I think a lot of white or light-skinned actors are finally facing a reality that most BIPOC actors have faced their entire lives…that there are a lot of roles they aren’t entitled to even be considered or to audition for because the role will require physical attributes that they don’t possess.

:respec:

It is already tough being a working actor and having to audition and compete for roles constantly and decisions were made based off of things mostly beyond your control, but now the thinking is changing from before when “white” was seen as the default and this it seemed like they could go for like 98% of roles…now it’s like 88-90% (I’m being generous here), and they are raising a fuss. Sound familiar?

It's interesting to hear objections now about darker-skinned actors getting picked for roles. Whereas in the past, there have been many light-skinned Hispanics who happily passed for white and got jobs and earned money doing so. Where were people at that time talking about how they benefitted while the darker-skinned actors got an inappropriately small portion of the pie at that time?
 
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PeterG

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What’s your favourite Brenda Chapman movie? Fave Mary Harron film? Penelope Spheeris? These three directors are interviewed in the 2018 documentary “Half The Picture” alongside Ava DuVernay, Catherine Hardwicke (Twilight), Kimberly Peirce (Boys Don’t Cry) and many others. The movie description from imdb.com reads, “A documentary about discriminatory hiring practices concerning women directors in Hollywood, and an inspiring conversation with those who have succeeded against all odds.”

I thought this movie was quite strong, it was great to see so many female directors come forward to speak on screen from those who were directing in the 80’s up until some of the newer female directors. The interviewees are quite forthcoming, so lots of great stories and information shared. Plus during the credits at the end of the movie, many female directors from the history of film are shown.

By the way, Brenda Chapman directed the animated movies Brave and The Prince Of Egypt. Mary Harron directed American Psycho and I Shot Andy Warhol. And Penelope Spheeris directed Wayne’s World and The Little Rascals.

Trailer for Half The Picture: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cazhHc0PFQ8
 

VGThuy

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39,960
The Prince of Egypt by Brenda Chapman for sure. I Shot Andy Warhol for sure by Mary Harron...and Lili Taylor gives an award-worthy performance in that one. As for Phenelope Spheeris, I have to go with Wayne's World. Didn't she have a bad relationship with Mike Myers and he didn't allow her to do the sequel? As much as I liked Wayne's World 2 there certainly was a dip between the first one and the second one. The Little Rascals was one of my most watched films as a kid.
 

PeterG

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13,270
The Prince of Egypt by Brenda Chapman for sure. I Shot Andy Warhol for sure by Mary Harron...and Lili Taylor gives an award-worthy performance in that one. As for Phenelope Spheeris, I have to go with Wayne's World. Didn't she have a bad relationship with Mike Myers and he didn't allow her to do the sequel? As much as I liked Wayne's World 2 there certainly was a dip between the first one and the second one. The Little Rascals was one of my most watched films as a kid.

Spheeris talks about her disappointment (anger?) in this documentary about not getting to direct the sequel. And she smiles mentioning how it did not do so well. :2faced:
 

PeterG

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13,270
Double Lover (L'Amant double) is an interesting/strange 2017 French erotic thriller. The lead character Chloe, seeks out a psychiatrist (Paul) to help with her depression. She is also experiencing intermittent stomach pains which are sometimes quite severe. They soon end their doctor/patient relationship as personal feelings grow. A romantic relationship begins. Then one day while on the bus, she spots Paul on the street, far away from his place of work. Or is it Paul? The confusion begins. There are many moments where something is happening…and then Chloe wakes up. But as it turns out, much more that we see is not real. Which makes for a confusing movie. Perhaps this is an erotic thriller for fans of Christopher Nolan, people who like a movie that comes in a form of a puzzle that one needs to put together as it goes along? For me, the highlight of this movie is Jérémie Renier, who gets to play two roles and does very well with each. The movie is good, but requires too much psychoanalytical work for me.

François Ozon is the director of Double Lover. He was nominated for a BAFTA award for 2010’s Potiche, starring Catherine Deneuve and Gérard Depardieu. Ozon has been nominated at the Cannes Film Festival for five different movies, beginning with 2003’s Swimming Pool starring Charlotte Rampling and Charles Dance.

Trailer for Double Lover: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xqVGWGG9J5Y
 

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