Cooking/Recipe Thread.

Spun Silver

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I just found this recipe in my bookmarks, you know, those pages you marked years ago and never looked at again. It sounds too good to be true but I am trying it anyway. I am a sucker for limited-ingredient "easy" recipes. I rarely bake so it better be easy. It looks decadent. I am making it tomorrow for Christmas Eve and Christmas and I refuse to feel guilty about all that chocolate, butter and sugar. Anyway, if I do feel guilty, I will have plenty of opportunity to repent what with three masses in two days (Advent 4 and Christmas Eve are on the same day for the first time I can remember-- so strange). I am ringing musical handbells at both the Christmas masses so all my cooking will be easy (I hope!) and done tomorrow.
http://www.kevinandamanda.com/dark-chocolate-salted-caramel-oreo-pie/
I've been meaning to update this post. I made this recipe and it lived up to the description. It is a chocolate lover's dream and probably the richest dessert I have ever made, or possibly tasted! So don't do what I did and make it just for yourself and your mate. Make it when there are a lot of people around to help you eat it!! Not that I regret it. A tip --although it is to be chilled and kept in the fridge, it is a lot easier to slice close to room temperature. I will definitely make this one again. Also, the Oreo crust was great and would work with other recipes, like a cheesecake for ex.

Btw, she talks about using a "flaky" salt like Kosher salt on top. I had never heard of flaky salt but we had a box of Kosher salt in the pantry and, what do you know, it's flaky. But if you only have a chunkier salt I wouldn't let that stop you.
 

gk_891

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One dish I hope to make one day is pernil which is a Christmas dish in the Spanish Caribbean.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bEAOLXH2JQw
I made this dish recently and I didn't really like it all that much. I found it on the plain side. It's funny how Spanish Caribbean food is mild, bordering on bland sometimes whereas food in the English Caribbean is full of spice, heat, and flavour.
 

TheGirlCanSkate

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I have been using King Arthur Flour website and making lots of different things, I'm most proud of sourdough though from my own starter. If you aren't comfortable with bread, pastries etc, they have great recipes and instructions. My daughter made the cinnamon star bread and it was gorgeous.
 

gk_891

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I've been trying to increase my intake of collagen and gelatin so I've been making cow heel/foot soup with ground provisions. I sort of followed this recipe but I skip the legumes/peas and the tripe as I don't care for them as well as the bouillon (I never have any on hand). And instead of garlic and onion powder, I used the fresh stuff as well as some green seasoning. I love it on a cold day.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qVeA1QgqDA
 

Prancer

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Does anyone here do meal prep/lunch bowls?

I am looking for recipes that are not made with chicken and/or rice. And if someone suggests I could sub things like quinoa for rice? Yeah; got that. But I would like to have some recipes that start with something besides chicken and rice.
 

ilovepaydays

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Does anyone here do meal prep/lunch bowls?

I am looking for recipes that are not made with chicken and/or rice. And if someone suggests I could sub things like quinoa for rice? Yeah; got that. But I would like to have some recipes that start with something besides chicken and rice.
Do you like root vegetables? You can always dice and roast carrots, potatoes, and/or beets and use that as your carb base. You can also use corn and use that as a base for a tex-mex bowl. Ramen noodles are quick and easy to use for bowls if you are want to use a stir-fry.

If you like salads for lunch - sometimes I prep some "Mason Jar Salads" I follow this for ideas and how to prep a hearty salad that won't get soggy! :D
 

TheGirlCanSkate

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I use clean food crush, pick up limes, I use UCDIM's 30 day vegan menus too. And I also went to a fab vegan cafe and took home a menu so I can recreate some of what I ate there. :D

Mostly though I just pack an extra dinner portion for lunches. I save more time that way.
 

clairecloutier

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When I was in San Jose for Nationals, I found a nice casual restaurant right near my hotel called Social Policy. I had a farro/mushroom/bacon pilaf there, and liked it so much that I recreated it when I got home. Here's my recipe for it. There are quite a few steps involved in this recipe, so it does take some time to make. However, the upside is it provides several days' worth of meals. Also, each step on its own is quite easy.


Farro/Mushroom/Bacon Pilaf
adapted from Social Policy restaurant in San Jose, CA

Bacon, 1 to 2 lbs.
Farro, 1¼ cup
Quinoa, ¼ cup
Water, 3 cups
Salt, 1 tsp or a bit more to taste
Olive oil, 1.5 tbsp or a little more
Butter, 1.5 tbsp or a little more
Red onion, 1 large, sliced thin
Red cabbage, ½ head, sliced thin or 1½ to 2 lbs brussels sprouts, shaved (i.e., leaves torn off heads)
Salt, ¾ tsp
Pepper, ¼ tsp
Butternut squash, 3 to 4 lbs
Butter, 2 tbsp
Olive oil, 2 tbsp
Garlic, 2 lrg, chopped, or more to taste
Mushrooms, 1½ to 2 lbs
Salt and pepper
Small squeeze of lemon juice
White wine or Marsala, ¼ cup


1. Cook bacon. Preheat oven to 400F. Cover 2 baking sheets with aluminum foil. Place racks on top. Arrange bacon slices on racks in single layer. Bake until bacon is to desired doneness, between 15 and 40 minutes. Remove from oven. Transfer bacon to plates lined with paper towels. Tear bacon into large pieces.

2. Cook farro & quinoa. Put grains in fine-mesh strainer; rinse. Bring water to boil in saucepan. When water boils, add salt and grains. Cover. Let simmer on low-medium heat for 20-25 minutes or until water is absorbed. Take pan off heat; remove lid. Cover with light tea towel or several layers of paper towels; put lid back on. Let rest for 10 min.

3. Steam butternut squash. Peel squash and cut into large-size dice (around 1-inch pieces). Steam until just tender.

4. Saute red onion and cabbage or shaved brussels sprouts. Put olive oil, butter, and red onion in large saute pan. Saute over medium heat until onions soften a bit. Add cabbage/brussels, salt, and black pepper. Increase heat to moderately high and cook, stirring, until the cabbage is crisp-tender, 5 to 7 min. Remove cabbage/brussels from saute pan; wipe out pan.

5. Saute mushrooms. Clean mushrooms with damp cloth, then slice. Heat butter & oil in saute pan over medium-low heat. Add garlic and cook until golden. Toss mushrooms into pan, season with salt, pepper & lemon juice. Turn heat up and saute. The mushrooms will release and then reabsorb their liquid. When the mushroom liquid has evaporated, pour wine/Marsala into pan. Boil until wine evaporates.

6. Combine all ingredients & serve!

I served this with spinach on the side--good.
 

Japanfan

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The pastry is basic brisée, ie American pie crust pastry, one crust only, made with butter. I presume that everyone has a recipe for this.
I only ever use pre-made crusts for quiche. It's just so much easier and TBH, I haven't noticed that home made pastry is so vastly superior to store-bought pastry.

I do make Greek cheese pies from filo pastry from time to time though, and they are much better than store bought largely because I am generous with the cheese (use a mix of parmesan and ricotta).

And I have made my own knishes in the past - potato with a variety of spicing. Probably could not find the equivalent of those store bought, either.
 

clairecloutier

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@Japanfan What do you usually serve along with your Greek cheese pies? Once in a while I'll make Greek pies using pita, but I always find them to be not very filling, I'm often hungry afterward. And I'm not quite sure what to serve with them.
 

Japanfan

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@Japanfan What do you usually serve along with your Greek cheese pies? Once in a while I'll make Greek pies using pita, but I always find them to be not very filling, I'm often hungry afterward. And I'm not quite sure what to serve with them.
Mine are quite filling because I put a generous amount of cheese in them - I've made them as appetizers and also to go with lamb, but they could be a meal on their own.

You could pair them with a Greek salad or a soup. If you want to make a totally Greek meal, avgolemono soup is wonderful. It's actually quite easy to make.
 

Japanfan

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If you want to make a totally Greek meal, avgolemono soup is wonderful. It's actually quite easy to make.
For some reason I can't edit my post.

I did want to add that if you make avoglemono soup, you will find different recipes for cooking the orzo online. I have worked it out, however, and recommend you use the water/orzo proportions on the package, bring to a boil, then simmer on low for seven minutes. This will give you perfect orzo.
 
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i made my first pasta around a month ago. i had all the ingredients at last. it was a smash by the family and they deny a chance to eat my homeade linguine. all thanks to my brother who gave me the pasta maker for christmas!
 

annie720

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When I was in San Jose for Nationals, I found a nice casual restaurant right near my hotel called Social Policy. I had a farro/mushroom/bacon pilaf there, and liked it so much that I recreated it when I got home. Here's my recipe for it. There are quite a few steps involved in this recipe, so it does take some time to make. However, the upside is it provides several days' worth of meals. Also, each step on its own is quite easy.

Farro/Mushroom/Bacon Pilaf
adapted from Social Policy restaurant in San Jose, CA ...............
Just wanted to let you know that I made his today and we liked it a lot! First time cooking farro and it was delish with the mushrooms! I left out the squash because I forgot to buy it, but threw in some sauteed zucchini. Thanks for the recipe!
 
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clairecloutier

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Glad you liked the recipe @annie720! :)

Speaking of recipes ... I came across one last week that is too good not to share. The recipe is for orange olive oil cake, from The Sullivan Street Bakery Cookbook by Jim Lahey. The main focus of this cookbook is bread recipes, but there are some very tempting-looking savory and non-bread recipes as well. What's great about this particular recipe is 1) it's very easy, 2) it doesn't require many unusual ingredients, and 3) the cake is incredibly moist.

This recipe is for an 8-inch round cake. I increased the recipe by half and baked it in a 9-inch springform pan. Came out great. One note on the olive oil. I found the flavor of it was pretty strong on the first day. By the second day, it mellowed quite a bit. If you want a less noticeable olive oil flavor, go with light olive oil instead of extra virgin.


Orange Olive Oil Cake

Flour, 1 1/4 cups + 2 tbsp
Baking powder, 1 tsp
Baking soda, 1/2 tsp
Coarse salt, 3/4 tsp
Sugar, 1 cup
Grated zest of 2 large navel oranges
2 large eggs
Fresh orange juice, 1/4 cup
Milk, 2/3 cup
Extra virgin olive oil, 3/4 cup

1. Heat oven to 350 F. Place rack in bottom third of oven. Line bottom of 8-inch round cake pan with circle of wax/parchment paper. (No need to oil or butter pan, due to all the olive oil in cake.)

2. Combine flour, baking powder, baking soda, and salt.

3. In another bowl, mix together sugar, orange zest, eggs, orange juice, milk, and olive oil.

4. Make well in dry ingredients; pour in wet ingredients. Mix until just combined. Pour batter into pan.

5. Bake about 50 minutes, until the center of the cake springs back and there is a beautiful, even, nut brown crust. You can also do the toothpick test--it's done when toothpick comes out with light crumbs on it.

6. Cool in pan for a few minutes. Run knife around edge; turn out onto greased rack to cool.
 
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My wife and I have been experimental with different types of "pop-corn" meats. We first had pop-corn shrimp at a local diner and have wondered how they did it, we found on-line video's and that made us curious to buy other things and try to do meats in the same style! It's fun.

https://www.beefitswhatsfordinner.com/recipes/recipe/5257/popcorn-steak-bites
http://www.wifelysteps.com/popcorn-calamari/

This web sight "Wifely Steps" is usefull in many ways, I think if I could of made up a name for my wife's duties and believes that name say's it all!
 

Simone411

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My brother and I had been trying to find a fried Kibbeh recipe that would be easy and not take as long to make. My dad made the best fried kibbeh, and he used ground beef with bulghur cracked wheat. We finally found a recipe that's pretty simple and I wanted to share it here. Kibbeh is a Lebanese/Syrian dish and it is totally delicious.

A simple Kibbeh Recipe
 

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