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Cooking/Recipe Thread.

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by becca, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    My family loves the broccoli slaw and ask for it for family gatherings.

    I have not been converted to quinoa yet.
     
  2. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    @algonquin Here is that recipe!


    Hoppin' John
    from The Boston Globe

    3 tablespoons olive oil (decrease a bit if you use all bacon)
    9-10 ounces ham, slab bacon, or combination, cut into ½-inch dice
    2 large onions, chopped
    1 green bell pepper, cored, seeded, and chopped
    4 stalks celery, chopped
    ½ teaspoon crushed red pepper, and some black pepper
    1 pound dried black-eyed peas, soaked overnight and drained
    1 quart water or chicken stock (Note: If you like your bean dishes soupy, increase liquid by half or more)
    2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley (for garnish)


    1. Put the olive oil and ham/bacon in a soup pot. Cook over medium heat, stirring often, for 8 minutes or until the meat starts to brown.

    2. Add the onions, peppers, celery, black pepper, and crushed red pepper to the pot. Cook over medium-low heat, stirring often, for 10 minutes, or until vegetables soften.

    3. Stir in the black-eyed peas and 1 quart water or stock. (Again, increase water/stock if you want soupy texture.) Bring to a boil, lower the heat, and cover the pan. Simmer for 60 minutes, adding more water during cooking if the mixture seems dry, or until the peas are tender. Taste for seasoning and add salt, black pepper, or red pepper, if you like. Serve over white rice and sprinkle with parsley.
     
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  3. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    I made the beans this week - they are amazing! The texture is buttery, not grainy and they are very tender. I liked that I didn't need to soak them. They are sold here under the name Peruano. Thanks for making me curious enough to try something new.
     
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  4. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    I just made and ate the recipes in posts 59 and 60 -- @ItalianFan's cabbage-potato fry amd @clairecloutier's butternut squash (in my version) with nuts and rosemary. Both were scrumptious. It was a little ironic to make such an ideal winter meal on a day when it came close to 70 degrees, but it was my night to cook and those were the ingredients on hand.

    Once again rosemary filled my kitchen with its enchanting aroma. I love the way the walnuts almost candied while roasting in oil. I cooked that one longer than the recipe specified, and it could have done with even more oven time - I like butternut squash best when it is roasted almost dry, blackened and crisp. But it was delicious simply cooked to the point of softness too. I really liked the addition of hot pepper to the cabbage-potato dish.

    My hubby was curious to hear that I got the cabbage-potato recipe from an Italian. He thinks of that combo as German, Swiss or Irish. No matter, we both love it. There is a great Irish dish called colcannon that uses potatoes, cabbage and cheese. We have served it as an Easter dish. We combine aspects of several different recipes -- if you're interested, just google it and see what looks good.
     
  5. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    I have left over buttermilk. Any recipes to share? I am not a fan of pancakes.
     
  6. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Feb 27, 2017
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  7. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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  8. aftershocks

    aftershocks Well-Known Member

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    I have been converted to quinoa. And I'm cutting back almost completely on pasta and staying away from corn, as I've realized that some foods and grains are better for my constitution than others, after checking out JoyfulBelly.com and taking the doshas test. I already rarely eat beef and pork. I tend to eat more fish with occasional chicken and turkey.

    I eat a lot of rice (preferrably basmati, wild or brown) and grits. I've even recently purchased a mixture of quinoa and basmati. The mixture has a very nice taste. I absolutely love avocados, but I am now slicing and eating either with sandwiches or as a side dish with a squeeze of either lemon or preferably lime juice and a sprinkle of salt. I don't make as much quacamole, since I'm cutting back a bit on tomatoes and onions.

    Of course, vegetables and fruits are a staple. Now though, rather than cold salads, I will lightly saute baby spinach and red lettuce with thin slices of cucumber for a warm salad.

    I totally love okra. I know some people don't because of its tendency to develop a slimy texture when cooked. The key though is to never add any water when you cook okra and the texture will not become slimy. I slice the okra, add a bit of chopped fresh garlic (and sometimes a small amount of chopped red onions -- I used to add a small amount of chopped cherry tomatoes too, but not much anymore). And then sprinkle slightly with olive oil and squeeze a bit of fresh lemon or lime juice and saute till tender but still slightly crunchy, if to your liking.
     
  9. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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  10. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Active Member

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    [My hubby was curious to hear that I got the cabbage-potato recipe from an Italian. He thinks of that combo as German, Swiss or Irish. No matter, we both love it. There is a great Irish dish called colcannon that uses potatoes, cabbage and cheese. We have served it as an Easter dish. We combine aspects of several different recipes -- if you're interested, just google it and see what looks good.[/QUOTE]

    Spunsilver: The area of Italy where I live was a part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until WWI and there are many many dishes of Germanic or Slavic tradition such as strudel, sauerkraut, goulash etc so your husband is right! I doubt that you would find such as dish in other parts of Italy.
     
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  11. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Active Member

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    Aren't grits made of corn? My brother-in-law is from VA and that's what he uses to make this elaborate cheese grits dish.
     
  12. aftershocks

    aftershocks Well-Known Member

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    I looked it up and you're right. Grits are made from ground corn. Thanks for pointing that out.

    I actually like corn, tomatoes, popcorn, and some other foods that I shouldn't eat a lot of. I can pull back a bit on some things and not necessarily eliminate completely. Maybe ground corn is easier to digest, and okay for me in moderation.
     
  13. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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  14. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    This sounds good, thanks for the recipe!

    So I have a question for people here: When you serve soup, what, if anything, do you typically serve with it/on the side?
     
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  15. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    @clairecloutier you are welcome. I usually serve soup with bread, sometimes a salad. Mind you, I was very hungry this morning.
     
  16. Anemone

    Anemone Well-Known Member

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    Growing, when my Mom gave us homemade soup, it was always served with homemade bread or rolls. I tend to do the same now.
     
  17. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    We have soup and salad or soup and fresh biscuits or just soup alone.
     
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  18. Japanfan

    Japanfan Well-Known Member

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  19. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    Last edited: Mar 3, 2017
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  20. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    Have you ever tried a four or five star recipe off the Internet and it turned out incredibly bland? That has happened a few times in the last couple of weeks. I am questioning is it my skills or do some people really like bland food?
     
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  21. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    I just made a soup that tasted like water. It had rave reviews. i don't get it.
     
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  22. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    Recipes never call for enough salt. Adding it is one huge cure for blandness. I have a tendency to add red pepper flakes to things. I will often use more herbs, cheese, and butter as well if I think it's necessary. (Conversely, I often substitute skim milk or half and half or a mix for cream.) When I make Indian dishes I use more spices each time and have yet to arrive at the perfect level of heat. Without such interventions, yeah, lots of recipes would be bland.
     
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  23. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    I often add more garlic and onion for flavor. :D

    What are some of the recipes that came out bland, @algonquin?
     
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  24. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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  25. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I could see that coming out bland. It's interesting that other people rated it highly--I guess everyone's tastes are different. Looking at the comments, it does sound like most people added a bit of salt and maybe one or two other flavorings.

    I find roast chicken generally pretty bland. In the past I've tried cooking it different ways to jazz it up a bit, but have never hit on a method that made it exciting. ;)
     
  26. Jenny

    Jenny From the Bloc

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    To me, the most bland part of chicken is the breast. Everybody loves that pretty white meat, but for me it's only good for making chicken salad. Instead, to get the most out of the juicier and tastier parts of the chicken, we've found the trick is to rotate it. If you leave it Norman Rockwell-style breast side up, the bottom doesn't cook as well and ends up all soggy and gross. If you rotate the bird a few times during roasting, you get an all over crispiness, and bonus, the breast meat benefits from being on the bottom for a time and getting some of the juiciness and flavour from the fattier parts of the chicken.

    For flavouring, we put a cut lemon and some fresh herbs (such as parsley or thyme, but go with what you have/like) inside, and sprinkle a liberal amount of olive oil and herbs de Provence all over the outside. We lay a few chunks of carrot, celery and onion around it that we will turn into a gravy to go with it. Sometimes I make buttermilk biscuits as well :)

    As for blandness in other recipes, I can see it from the food companies like Betty Crocker as per @algonquin's link as they need to appeal to the masses. If you like more flavoursome food, try the tv/restaurant chefs, who if anything tend to overdo it with salt, garlic and chilies because that's what makes you go wow in a restaurant, plus I think their tolerance is higher. Once you find a chef you like, seek out more of their recipes and you'll likely find that you like them as well. Many have their own websites, and there's a ton on the Food Network sites, and of course you can always pick up their books too.
     
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  27. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    My tolerance for salt and garlic is high. :lol: Probably too high.

    Chilies are still something I'm easing into ... Definitely not eating raw hot peppers here yet or anything. :) But I do find I'm more okay with heat all the time in food. Once you start going hotter, your palate adjusts, I think.

    Thanks for the roast chicken ideas. Maybe I will give it another try.
     
  28. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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  29. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    @Jenny Good point about Betty Crocker. I searched for a chicken and vegetable recipe and it was one of the few that I could find. Below is my favourite roasted chicken recipe. It was in Canadian Living a number of years ago. (I did not copy out the recipe for the gravy.) It is an excellent recipe originally from Tuscany.

    Marietta's Roast Chicken
    3/12 Chicken
    1/2 tsp salt
    pinch of pepper
    half lemon
    5 garlic gloves peeled
    3 sprigs of fresh sage
    1 tbsp of olive oil
    1 cup chicken stock


    Remove giblets and neck from chicken
    Sprinke cavity with some of salt & pepper
    Add lemon, garlic & 1 sprig of sage to cavity
    Place on rack in roasting pan
    Brush oil over outside & sprinkle with remaining salt & pepper
    pour 1 1/2 cups of water into the pan (add more as needed)
    add sage to the water
    bake at 450 for 1 1/2 hours until 185 f
    Remove from oven, tent with foil & let stand for 5 to 10 minutes
     
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  30. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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