UPDATES ON MY DREAM TO LEARN TO ICE-DANCE...WISH ME LUCK!!

FSWer

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3,688
HEY GUYS!!! I never got to post my Report from my last lesson. So here it is....Nick worked with me on balancing on one foot (both feet). He also worked on my One-Foot-Glide...and we also (I guess we could say...began) working on getting me used to balancing on one foot, while just holding a Partner's hand,without letting a Partner support me. LOL. I guess in lame Terms, LOL. I'm not used yet to balancing be holding onto something...Live...VS....(and forgive the spelling of this word)...intermediate. So,if ANYONE here has any advice for me to help me a bit on that. Or if there's an Ice-Dancer here can give me a tip from when THEY learned it...that would be super GREAT!!!
 

gkelly

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15,196
I think it just takes a lot of practice.

There's a certain move for the Foxtrot that I can only do holding on to the wall or holding my coach's hand, but not all by myself. My goal is to be able to do it just touching his hand but not letting him support me. I've been working on it for years. It gets better very slowly -- much better than 2 years ago, but not yet as good as it should be.

So just keep working on the one-foot glides, and eventually they will feel easier for you. But it won't happen in one week or one month.
 

FSWer

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3,688
I think it just takes a lot of practice.

There's a certain move for the Foxtrot that I can only do holding on to the wall or holding my coach's hand, but not all by myself. My goal is to be able to do it just touching his hand but not letting him support me. I've been working on it for years. It gets better very slowly -- much better than 2 years ago, but not yet as good as it should be.

So just keep working on the one-foot glides, and eventually they will feel easier for you. But it won't happen in one week or one month.
BTW. I meant to ask...when holding a Partner's hand...is MY arm, and my PARTNER'S arm supposed to both be at arms-leinth straight out...OR.....pointing down at the Ice?
 

Clarice

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902
BTW. I meant to ask...when holding a Partner's hand...is MY arm, and my PARTNER'S arm supposed to both be at arms-leinth straight out...OR.....pointing down at the Ice?
It depends. When I practice stroking with my coach, first we sort of skate around casually with our hands pointing down until we get to the end of the rink where we want to start. Then, when we start our side-by-side stroking, our arms are out to the sides - not quite straight at arms length, though - we keep a slight bend at the elbow.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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27,773
@FSWer the direction you hold your partner's arm depends on what you are doing. If you are just standing still your arms would usually be relaxed and at your sides. If you are skating side by side doing basic stroking, your arms would usually be at shoulder height and straight.

For balancing on one foot - it takes time to learn this as @gkelly says. But you can practice it off ice. We have talked about this. Standing on the floor is not exactly the same as balancing on a skate blade on ice, but if you practice standing on one foot off-ice, not holding onto anything, that will really help you do the same thing on ice.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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27,773
DO even famous Ice-Dancers sometimes support each other?
@FSWer of course they do sometimes. It would be hard to do a lift on your own :) But famous ice dancers are always very strong skaters on their own.

When ice dancers take tests (which many of them have to do to qualify to compete) one of the things the judges look for is whether both skaters are equally strong. You can fail an ice dance test if the judges think that your partner is guiding you too much or pushing you through the dance.

The judges can sometimes ask you to do the dance on your own if they think your partner is helping you too much. They want to be sure that you can do the dance well enough on your own before they let you pass the test.
 
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FSWer

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3,688
BTW. is there a curtain way that would be recommended for a Novice Ice-DANCER?...Say,I was just wondering too...how many of you here up to this point actually believe I can do it AND have what it takes? LOL.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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27,773
@FSWer the way you hold your partner's hand, or arm, depends on what you are doing. There is no special way that you would hold on to your partner depending on what level of skater you are.

But you should also remember that if you are not able to balance on one foot on your own, it can be very dangerous for you to skate with a partner - no matter how you are holding on to them. If you are not able to balance, you could fall very easily and hurt yourself or your partner, even if your partner is a coach or an experienced skater.

My own coach is just getting out of hospital this week after a knee operation - his knee was damaged several years ago when he was holding hands with a beginner skater, and the skater suddenly fell and took him down with her. That is how easily an accident can happen that can hurt even a very experienced skater.

You need to work on developing good basic skating skills, and being confident in skating on your own, before you worry about how to hold hands with a partner.
 
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Clarice

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902
When you are practicing stroking or gliding on one foot, you should extend your arms out to the sides and a little in front, just enough that you can see your hands. This helps with balance. Most of the time at this stage, you need to be practicing by yourself to develop your own skills. If you need someone else to help support you, that means you can't really do that skill yet. You cannot skate with a partner until you are a good skater yourself.
 

Yazmeen

Shake it then, shake it now, shake it forever
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5,315
FSWer - I hope this might help you get the best arm position while stroking or gliding - "pat the dogs."

It's a technique I was taught and I used to use when I helped teach. Imagine that while you are on the ice, you have two large dogs like, say, German Shephards in front of you, one on the right, one on the left. Your arms should be in front of you and out to each side. Basically, your arms should be out in front slightly to each side at about waist/hip level where you could easily pat the dogs on the head without bending over.

My students always knew that if I skated up to them and said "pat the dogs" their arms were not in the right position or they were flailing them all over the place.

And I will reiterate what others are saying here. This is not the time to be concerned about getting a partner or worrying if you have "what it takes" to be an ice dancer. It's time to learn to skate. You might be getting tired of hearing us say this over and over, but you must learn to skate FIRST. Partnering comes much later.
 

FSWer

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3,688
@FSWer the way you hold your partner's hand, or arm, depends on what you are doing. There is no special way that you would hold on to your partner depending on what level of skater you are.

But you should also remember that if you are not able to balance on one foot on your own, it can be very dangerous for you to skate with a partner - no matter how you are holding on to them. If you are not able to balance, you could fall very easily and hurt yourself or your partner, even if your partner is a coach or an experienced skater.

My own coach is just getting out of hospital this week after a knee operation - his knee was damaged several years ago when he was holding hands with a beginner skater, and the skater suddenly fell and took him down with her. That is how easily an accident can happen that can hurt even a very experienced skater.

You need to work on developing good basic skating skills, and being confident in skating on your own, before you worry about how to hold hands with a partner.
So DON'T hold my hand RIGHT out. Hold it right out in FRONT,right?
 

Clarice

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902
No. You don't hold your arms straight out to the side, or straight out in front. You can try this right now, off the ice. Hold your arms straight out to the sides. Keep looking straight in front of you and move your arms forward just until you can see your hands. That is where they belong. Did you read what Yazmeen said about "patting the dogs"? That is another good way to imagine where your arms belong.

Where does Nick have you put your arms? You should know where they belong by now.
 

FSWer

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3,688
@FSWer the way you hold your partner's hand, or arm, depends on what you are doing. There is no special way that you would hold on to your partner depending on what level of skater you are.

But you should also remember that if you are not able to balance on one foot on your own, it can be very dangerous for you to skate with a partner - no matter how you are holding on to them. If you are not able to balance, you could fall very easily and hurt yourself or your partner, even if your partner is a coach or an experienced skater.

My own coach is just getting out of hospital this week after a knee operation - his knee was damaged several years ago when he was holding hands with a beginner skater, and the skater suddenly fell and took him down with her. That is how easily an accident can happen that can hurt even a very experienced skater.

You need to work on developing good basic skating skills, and being confident in skating on your own, before you worry about how to hold hands with a partner.
Btw. THAT'S what it's called that I'm learning....Stroking?
 

FSWer

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3,688
FSWer - I hope this might help you get the best arm position while stroking or gliding - "pat the dogs."

It's a technique I was taught and I used to use when I helped teach. Imagine that while you are on the ice, you have two large dogs like, say, German Shephards in front of you, one on the right, one on the left. Your arms should be in front of you and out to each side. Basically, your arms should be out in front slightly to each side at about waist/hip level where you could easily pat the dogs on the head without bending over.

My students always knew that if I skated up to them and said "pat the dogs" their arms were not in the right position or they were flailing them all over the place.

And I will reiterate what others are saying here. This is not the time to be concerned about getting a partner or worrying if you have "what it takes" to be an ice dancer. It's time to learn to skate. You might be getting tired of hearing us say this over and over, but you must learn to skate FIRST. Partnering comes much later.
I'm not understanding Pat the Dogs what it means.
 

Yazmeen

Shake it then, shake it now, shake it forever
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I'm not understanding Pat the Dogs what it means.
It means the position for your arms in front of you when you skate and glide should be where you could pat a large imaginary dog on the head in front of you on your right side with you right hand and pat another one on your left with your left hand without having to bend over. Talk to Nick about how to hold your arms, he will help you.
 

LilJen

Reaching out with my hand sensitively
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12,879
Another image that might help is to pretend you have a table in front of you. Pretend you're putting your hands on the table, not straight in front of you, but towards the edges. That's about the right level and location for your arms--bellybutton level and not straight to the side OR straight in front but about halfway between those two points.

Just keep practicing, FSWer. Skating takes a LOT of patience and a LOT of practice. And you'll trip and fall a lot; goodness knows I do!! Just keep getting up and trying and listening to your coaches' advice.

PS: And yes, "stroking" is a general term for that pushing and gliding you do on the ice. EVERY SINGLE SKATER, from beginner to world champion, works on stroking every day, doing just what you are doing, making sure you're not using their toepicks to push, putting their arms in the right place, and so forth.
 

pp55

Active Member
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371
Another image that might help is to pretend you have a table in front of you. Pretend you're putting your hands on the table, not straight in front of you, but towards the edges. That's about the right level and location for your arms--bellybutton level and not straight to the side OR straight in front but about halfway between those two points.
Adding "another image": it's about how far in front and to the side your arms are. Imagine you hold a stick (or hockey stick) in your hand. Bellybutton level and in front of you. This is how far and how "levelled" your arms/hand should be.

I actually saw it long time ago at one of the adult sessions. The coach had a hockey stick and used it with one of the beginners (adult skater). She showed it first to the skater, then gave the stick to the skater and asked him to use it this way. It was because that skater tried to push and at the same time his arms were moving up and down. With the stick he could keep the arms almost at the same level.
 

Yazmeen

Shake it then, shake it now, shake it forever
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5,315
Believe it or not, I train with a hula hoop on my back to keep from bending at the waist and keep my arms in the correct position. Really works!
 

Clarice

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902
Believe it or not, I train with a hula hoop on my back to keep from bending at the waist and keep my arms in the correct position. Really works!
I've used both hula hoops and pool noodles with my learn to skate students.
 

FSWer

Well-Known Member
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3,688
Another image that might help is to pretend you have a table in front of you. Pretend you're putting your hands on the table, not straight in front of you, but towards the edges. That's about the right level and location for your arms--bellybutton level and not straight to the side OR straight in front but about halfway between those two points.

Just keep practicing, FSWer. Skating takes a LOT of patience and a LOT of practice. And you'll trip and fall a lot; goodness knows I do!! Just keep getting up and trying and listening to your coaches' advice.

PS: And yes, "stroking" is a general term for that pushing and gliding you do on the ice. EVERY SINGLE SKATER, from beginner to world champion, works on stroking every day, doing just what you are doing, making sure you're not using their toepicks to push, putting their arms in the right place, and so forth.
So,just put my hand like I'm patting a Dog? BTW. you guys just TAUGHT me something. You all are the first ones I learned the term "Stroking" from. Nick didn't get to mentioning it yet. Thanks....you all are Dolls!!
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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27,773
So DON'T hold my hand RIGHT out. Hold it right out in FRONT,right?
@FSWer this is what I said in the message that you quoted. Where you hold your hand depends on what you are doing on the ice.

Several of the posters here have given you really good ideas on how to hold your hands and arms when you are skating by yourself. You can also ask your coach to show you what to do.

As we keep telling you, you will have to be a good skater on your skating on your own before you are able to skate with a partner. Learning to hold your arms and hands to balance yourself on your own is part of learning to be a good skater.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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27,773
When we talk about depending on what I'm doing...can you give me an example?
@FSWer if you are skating by yourself, in a straight line or on a shallow curve, you would usually hold your arms at about waist level and slightly out to your sides - "patting the dogs" as @Yasmeen described it.

If you are going around a corner or doing crossovers, you might hold your arms a little higher and maybe have one arm slightly farther ahead of the other - usually the right arm would be "leading" if you were travelling to the left. This can help you balance better when you are going around a corner. But some skaters feel more comfortable just leaving their arms in the "regular" position, especially when they are just starting to learn crossovers.

There are also arm positions that help you do a good jump or a spin.

If you are skating with a partner, you would either be holding hands with your arms at shoulder height, as @Clarice described, or in the hold that is the right hold for the dance you are doing. But you need to be able to skate well on your own before you work on holding hands with a partner.
 

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