Hurricane Ida

skatfan

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The power could be out for weeks. Thank God my parents have a generator and I can stay here. I’m just worried about being able to get gas, food and other essentials. Stores were already short staffed because of YKW. It’s going to be even more of a mess no
I think you need to seriously consider evacuating. No power, no sewer, no water. Gas pumps won’t work without electricity, which won’t be restored quickly. Stores will be closed because employees can’t come in, no ATMs, and no trucks supplying. It’s going to get bad very quickly.

It’s not me saying this but former General Russell Honore on cable TV tonight.
 

Simone411

Do stand. Do stand six. Do stand six feet from me.
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I finally had a reply on FB from the sister of my cousin's wife. She said that they made it through safely. She said they didn't have very good reception, but would inform us of more when they could.

That's all I know, and I'm just thankful that they're alive.

@TanithandBenFan, I agree with @skatfan. Maybe y'all should get away from there at least for the time being. I have a feeling that my cousins are in the same situation. I'm glad they made it safely, but they should consider evacuating also since all the power lines are down.
 

TanithandBenFan

Author of the Ice and Edge Series
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I think you need to seriously consider evacuating. No power, no sewer, no water. Gas pumps won’t work without electricity, which won’t be restored quickly. Stores will be closed because employees can’t come in, no ATMs, and no trucks supplying. It’s going to get bad very quickly.

It’s not me saying this but former General Russell Honore on cable TV tonight.
My parents have a whole house generator so we have power, and the suburb they live in has its own water and sewer system that is operational. The only concerns we have will be groceries and gas. One of the local grocery chains is already opening four of its stores today so I hope more will follow suit in the coming days. If we didn’t have power or water I’d be on the first plane to my sister’s in Dallas.
 

skatfan

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My parents have a whole house generator so we have power, and the suburb they live in has its own water and sewer system that is operational. The only concerns we have will be groceries and gas. One of the local grocery chains is already opening four of its stores today so I hope more will follow suit in the coming days. If we didn’t have power or water I’d be on the first plane to my sister’s in Dallas.
Glad to hear!
 

FGRSK8

Toad whisperer.....
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I have been reading the post mortem on the forecasting for Hurricane Ida. I had stated a couple of days ago that Theo needs unknown was whether Ida would undergo explosive intensification. It turned out it did, going from 80mph sustained winds to 150 mph in 20 hours. I have a feeling that after analyzing all the data and investigation of the damage done by the hurricane, it is possible they may upgrade Ida to a cat 5 at landfall. That would require a sustained wind of 157 mph or greater. I think their data and damage assessments will show that was the case.
 

rfisher

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the good news for NOLA is that the upgrades to the levee system worked. There isn't much any city or state can do about power outages, even if all the residential feed lines are underground. If the main plant is impacted that's it.

I'm surprised listening to some of the interviews on the news. It's not as if people weren't warned and haven't lived through hurricanes before. Why wouldn't you have cash on hand? Why wouldn't you have hurricane supplies? My friends who live in Florida have hurricane supply kits with food, water, emergency batteries...pretty much everything they need. Yet, some people always act so surprised that the storm caused damage. I don't get it.
 

ballettmaus

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Alligators in the flood water. Fun. (Not surprising but still. Not something I'd want to have to deal with in addition to everything else).
 

Spikefan

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I'm surprised listening to some of the interviews on the news. It's not as if people weren't warned and haven't lived through hurricanes before. Why wouldn't you have cash on hand? Why wouldn't you have hurricane supplies? My friends who live in Florida have hurricane supply kits with food, water, emergency batteries...pretty much everything they need. Yet, some people always act so surprised that the storm caused damage. I don't get it.
I agree with this except for those in poverty, which is a lot of people. Hard to have extra of anything when you are never ahead or don’t even have it to begin with.
 

ballettmaus

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I agree with this except for those in poverty, which is a lot of people. Hard to have extra of anything when you are never ahead or don’t even have it to begin with.
A day before Ida made landfall, I read a comment by someone who said that they had asked an acquaintance of sorts if they were evacuating or why they weren't evacuating and the person said something along the lines of they can either evacuate or pay bills. :(
 

FGRSK8

Toad whisperer.....
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I am not on Twitter but can still read some Twitter feeds.

look at the “Port Fourchon” Twitter feed to see what is going on and what the status of things. Also there are some pretty harrowing stories from folks who were at Port Fourchon when the hurricane hit.
 

VGThuy

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the good news for NOLA is that the upgrades to the levee system worked. There isn't much any city or state can do about power outages, even if all the residential feed lines are underground. If the main plant is impacted that's it.

I'm surprised listening to some of the interviews on the news. It's not as if people weren't warned and haven't lived through hurricanes before. Why wouldn't you have cash on hand? Why wouldn't you have hurricane supplies? My friends who live in Florida have hurricane supply kits with food, water, emergency batteries...pretty much everything they need. Yet, some people always act so surprised that the storm caused damage. I don't get it.
There are different kinds of situations going on in New Orleans. Let’s just say, some are indeed stubborn and aren’t prepared despite knowing better. When one lives in a hurricane zone and year after year keep being told in the most sensational way how awful that storm is going to be but then it turns out to be ok, one gets jaded about prepping for the next storm even though there is good and valid reasons for such stern warnings.

Others were prepared but their money is running out because they evacuated but don’t have people to help them with shelter/food/gas. Some originally hunkered down and were going to live their supplies but have left because the heat is unbearable and there are not gas/stores that are open. Some have no water.

Then there are others who truly don’t have cash in their bank (if they have a bank account) to have cash on hand. It also takes money to prepare…money, storage space, not living in a good desert, etc. New Orleans, like many cities has huge income disparity and as Katrina exposed to the world, true poverty exists in America and it certainly exists in New Orleans. New Orleans leads the nation of metro areas of people living in poverty and over 21% live in poverty while nearly 14% are considered very low income and are below the 50% poverty line. Other Parishes may even be poorer overall even if they actually have more land.

Anyway, my family planned on hunkering down before I convinced them to evacuate and even made reservations for hotels in Houston for them. I’ve been funding their entire shelter since Saturday and honestly, I don’t know what would have happened to them financially if I wasn’t able to provide that help for them.
 
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rfisher

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Oh, I understand some have financial issues that prevent them from either evacuating or having additional supplies. It was the interviews with people who were whining about the ATMs and credit cards being non-functioning. Do these people not read post-apocalyptic novels? :lol: You always have an emergency cash supply because the power grid turns a credit society into a cash society.

Maybe it's just the people who get interviewed who act like the post hurricane results are such a surprise.
 

Aceon6

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Maybe it's just the people who get interviewed who act like the post hurricane results are such a surprise.
I think the news crews deliberately focus on these types. The “No, I’m good. I grabbed my emergency bag, put the pets in their crates, and boogied as soon as I could.” doesn’t make the broadcast or generate any clicks.

The folks who had experience being without power for more than a day probably were as prepared as their circumstances allowed.
 

VGThuy

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Oh, I understand some have financial issues that prevent them from either evacuating or having additional supplies. It was the interviews with people who were whining about the ATMs and credit cards being non-functioning. Do these people not read post-apocalyptic novels? :lol: You always have an emergency cash supply because the power grid turns a credit society into a cash society.

Maybe it's just the people who get interviewed who act like the post hurricane results are such a surprise.
That’s so true. It’s like you were definitely told. People will be people, won’t they? I one time had a customer at Barnes laugh at us when we last lost power and had to open our registers with a key and use a calculator for cash. They were like this new generation can’t do anything without electricity. Then he left the department and came back and complained that the escalators weren’t working and waited for an answer with an expectation for us to fix it. I couldn’t roll my eyes far enough.
 

Vagabond

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I'm not from hurricane country, so I don't know the ins and outs of emergency responses, but I did see that Terrebonne Parish, which includes Houma, where @Simone411 's relatives live, issued an evacuation order and provided a transportation and shelter for those in need.
Terrebonne Parish residents who have no other arrangements can take a bus Saturday morning to an emergency shelter in Monroe. Buses will leave starting at 6 a.m. from H.L. Bourgeois High School, 1 Reservation Court in Gray.

Anyone who needs a ride to H.L. Bourgeois High can call the parish Office of Emergency Preparedness at 873-6357 to arrange for pickup. Evacuees should bring sufficient food, water, bedding, baby formula, medicine and supplies to last at least three days.
Do other parishes/counties in hurricane zones make similar arrangements? And why wouldn't anyone short on money and with no other arrangements avail himself of the opportunity?

:confused:
 

VGThuy

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I'm not from hurricane country, so I don't know the ins and outs of emergency responses, but I did see that Terrebonne Parish, which includes Houma, where @Simone411 's relatives live, issued an evacuation order and provided a transportation and shelter for those in need.

Do other parishes/counties in hurricane zones make similar arrangements? And why wouldn't anyone short on money and with no other arrangements avail himself of the opportunity?

:confused:
No.


St. Charles Parish has set up two areas as a refuge of last resort. One is on the West Bank at the Edward A. Dufresne Community Center located at 274 Judge Edward A. Dufresne Parkway, and the other is on the East Bank at Harry Hurst Middle School gym located at 170 Road Runner Lane in Destrehan.

Residents who feel their lives are in danger due to Hurricane Ida can travel to this location and take refuge. If you live in a trailer, mobile home or other substandard structure, you need to take refuge in one of these locations.

No supplies will be provided at the site. Residents must bring all of their own supplies including food, clothing, medications and water.


Many of those who evacuated may have had enough money to escape and stay for a few days or even a week but then you know money runs out not to mention many who have evacuated are being told not to come back until they are told it was safe.

Both Orleans and Jefferson Parish each have four times the population of Terrebonne Parish.
 

Simone411

Do stand. Do stand six. Do stand six feet from me.
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I'm not from hurricane country, so I don't know the ins and outs of emergency responses, but I did see that Terrebonne Parish, which includes Houma, where @Simone411 's relatives live, issued an evacuation order and provided a transportation and shelter for those in need.

Do other parishes/counties in hurricane zones make similar arrangements? And why wouldn't anyone short on money and with no other arrangements avail himself of the opportunity?

:confused:
Thanks for letting me know this. I don't know why they didn't leave. I know they had a way to go (their vehicles) and could have afforded to leave. I haven't been on FB yet or to my cousin's FB page. I'm going there shortly to find out if there's anymore news from them.
 

TanithandBenFan

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I went to two grocery stores today and neither would take cash which was perfect for me. More credit card points!

I made the 45 mile drive to my apartment to check on it and it was all good! I had towels against the front door and they were wet so the rain beating against the door must have come under. The management had advised us to guard against that. Now just praying the power comes back soon so I can return for good. The power situation over there seems to be in better shape than over here on the southshore. My office is getting power today supposedly.
 

skatfan

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I'm not from hurricane country, so I don't know the ins and outs of emergency responses, but I did see that Terrebonne Parish, which includes Houma, where @Simone411 's relatives live, issued an evacuation order and provided a transportation and shelter for those in need.

Do other parishes/counties in hurricane zones make similar arrangements? And why wouldn't anyone short on money and with no other arrangements avail himself of the opportunity?

:confused:
There weren't evacuation buses beforehand in NOLA that I heard about.
 

TanithandBenFan

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If Orleans Parish had been under a mandatory evacuation I believe they would have provided buses and maybe even trains. For one of the post-Katrina storms (maybe Gustav?) I think they did this.
 

skatfan

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There really wasn’t. Ida formed very quickly and took residents by surprise compared to the usual hurricane path that allowed for more preparedness all-around.
So, what happens when the next high intensity storm shows up? These types of storms that form late are going to be more common according to climate scientists.

It may mean starting evacuations when you aren’t sure how bad things will get and “wasting resources”. Because as we see, no plan doesn’t work very well.
 

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