Trusova breaks 100 in TES.

Tinami Amori

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18,851
:yawn: Let's discuss these quad wonder girls AFTER they aren't starved so they don't hit puberty.
What an ass..le thing to say... Alysa Liu is jumping quads and she is not starved, and has a russian coach.. ;) Japanese girls are jumping quads, Kihira is not starving.... oh, but then they are americans and japanese.. it's the Russians that have "problems".

These comments are getting beyond pathetic now
They usually do... when Russians have something good happening, or start winning. If you don't like someone, that someone can't be winning, or can't be winning for the right reasons. Muffinplus... it's been like that on FSU since 2002.. you should have read the comments after the Olys "awful Irina, beautiful Kwan".. :D

Sasha is a star, a record breaker, energetic, dynamic, independent and willful girl. TeamTuberdize, when the main coaches step away from the ice, appoint people to keep an eye on Sasha, so she does not jump behind their backs the jumps they don't want her to try yet. With or without Tuberidze, on any ice, the girl would go wild with jumps, if nobody stops her. It's not that Eteri trained and made her jump, it's that Eteri made sure she did not break her neck trying to jump... :lol: and Trusova eats like a pig... everything.

 
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Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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48,956
Congratulations to Trusova.
Last time Ladies Division skater challenged the best of Men, technically, was 1988-92. Midori Ito did have technical content (up to triple Axel), since the quad age was just dawning in Mens Division. Browing's first ratified quad toe was at 1988 Worlds. I have to admit that I was rabid Midori fan, then and now. IMHO, Midori would have won JPN Nationals in Mens if she was allowed to compete, 1990-92, since she was the only one landing triple Axel in JPN, man or woman, unitil Kagiyama (the father) managed it. The major difference between Trusova and Ito is the age, Midori was born in 1969, so her first 3Ax in international competition was landed in 88 NHK at age 19. However, Midori's first 3Ax attempt (fall) was in 1984 NHK when she was 15.
Midori Ito was, IMHO, unfairly dinged in artistic scores, until 1989. She was rather un-artistic during her early career, 1981-86, but developed quite nicely, so that low artistic scores particularly 1987-1988 period was simply unfair. Her Calgary Free Skate should have won that portion of the event hands down, but was held back to third place by some incredibly awful judging.
IMHO, perfectly executed jumps have a unique athletic beauty by itself, almost a poetry in motion. Midori at her prime, displayed this in spades. Trusova reminded me of this "Sense of Wonder", I always felt when I was bowled over by Midori's excellent performances, particularly 1989 NHK Free Skate "Shez". For thrity years, for me, this was the BEST Ladies Free performance ever.
Thank you, Trusova for bringing back that "Sense of Wonder" to the Ladies Skating.
I too was and still am a big fan of Midori Ito. I don't remember who said (Dick Button?) that her jumps were her artistry. They were breathtaking. I too loved her Scheherzadeh LP in 1990. Last year when I first watched Trusova at the JGPF, I thought I have not been this excited about a lady skater since Midori Ito. Trusova is luckier than Midori in that she is getting the marks she deserves. Midori was often undermarked, but she worked on her artistry and won the world championship in 1989. She should have won earlier. As a pro I remember Midori delivering beautiful triple axel jumps. She was considered the Michael Jordan of ladies figure skating. She would have won a medal if she had competed against the men of her times. Trusova reminds me of her, although their looks and skating style are very different. They are both willing to challenge themselves to do the jumps the men do. Midori broke her ankle while trying a quad toe jump at that time. I am so happy to see Trusova changing the sport again. It was stagnating, with all ladies doing the same technical content (except for a couple of skaters landing triple axels).
 

rosewood

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Regardless of how small or young she is, it’s a huge accomplishment. No women had ever done this before. Good for her.
This. Kudos to the major break through on the athletic side in Sr women's field after a long time since Midori's first ever 3A! I appreciate this brave woman's achievement as well as her teammate Shcherbakova's landing of two 4Lzs (the most difficult quad) in one program. I miss @NadineWhite. Where are you? It's the time for you to run another 10 blocks!! :D

That's awesome! Maybe it's the angle, but in this video the size of her jump does not compare badly to Hanyu's.
No, it's not the camera angle. Here is another video from a different camera angle. Her 4T is actually higher than one of the strongest quad jumpers in men's field. What a determined jumper she is!
 

lily

Active Member
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485
I don’t see Trusova so endlessly starved that she cannot even hit the puberty. She looks happy and pleased so far and I don’t believe she is acting that.

It is getting ridiculous all this talk “yeah she is jumping those quads right now, but it is nothing, let see where she is when puberty hits her” or “more complete skaters aren’t rewarded” or “she has no longevity”. Who of current skaters had great longevity? I can remember only Carolina Kostner. Also, Ashley Wagner had some longevity but it didn't end how she wanted. Yeah and Plushenko had some longevity but wasn't his longevity a little bit too much? :) All the other complete or not complete skaters stopped skating career when they 1. won what they were able to win 2. got injured 3. just didn’t progress anymore.
 

Tak

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2,714
I am so happy to see Trusova changing the sport again. It was stagnating, with all ladies doing the same technical content (except for a couple of skaters landing triple axels).
This statement made me think a bit, and I would like to suggest that "Technical Stagnation" occurred in Mens Division rather than Ladies. Triple Axel was first landed by Vern Taylor in 1978, and Midori was attempting it by 1984-85. By 1991 Worlds, Midori and Tonya was having triple Axel shootout in Ladies. Considering that Dick Button landed first triple in early 1950s, it really took Mens Division skaters a long time to reach triple Axel, nearly 30 years. If the same time period is considered, the first quad Axel should have been landed around 2018. IMHO, Mens Division was pushed by Midori and Tonya into the quad age. However, while quad Sal was introduced relatively quickly (Goebel:1998), it took a long time before Mroz(2011), Shoma(2016) and Hanyu(2016) brought quad Lutz, flip and loop to Mens Division. Now, we may see a quad Lutz shootout between Shcherbakova and Trusova at 2020 Worlds, these gals may force the Mens Division to go for that quad Ax and beyond....
 
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Finsta

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338
Good points. Seems maybe it started with Medvedeva. And the only way to beat her then was to backload all jumps. Then to beat that needing quads and 3axels.
 

essence_of_soy

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This statement made me think a bit, and I would like to suggest that "Technical Stagnation" occurred in Mens Division rather than Ladies. Triple Axel was first landed by Vern Taylor in 1978, and Midori was attempting it by 1984-85. By 1991 Worlds, Midori and Tonya was having triple Axel shootout in Ladies. Considering that Dick Button landed first triple in early 1950s, it really took Mens Division skaters a long time to reach triple Axel, nearly 30 years. If the same time period is considered, the first quad Axel should have been landed around 2018. IMHO, Mens Division was pushed by Midori and Tonya into the quad age. However, while quad Sal was introduced relatively quickly (Goebel?), it took a long time before Mroz?, Shoma and Hanyu borught quad Lutz, flip and loop to Mens Division. Now, we may see a quad Lutz shootout between Shcherbakova and Trusova at 2020 Worlds, these gals may force the Mens Division to go for that quad Ax and beyond....
I remember a season or two ago where some of the guys were attempting quad axels in the harness. From memory, I think Keegan Messing and Brendan Kerry were amongst them. There was also a little Russian junior guy who was attempting a quintuple toe loop as well.

The torque the body experiences even rotating quads must be enormous. Not to mention the impact when these jumps fail.
 
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Sasha'sSpins

♥2018 US Olympic Dream Team! Legends!♥
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I was rooting for the Quad Queen to win - and she won! All the while breaking records all over the ice.

Congratulations Sasha! ❤ :cheer2::respec::cheer:

Trusova is tiny but she is taller than Tara was at the same age, and IMO, physically Lipinski looked even more child-like. Everyone develops at different times, not to mention that high intensity training often delays puberty in young girls. Look at former gymnasts like Kim Zmeskal, Shannon Miller, Dominique Dawes (at the 1992 Summer Olympics), and Dominique Moceanu at the 1996 Games. Zmeskal, Miller, and Dawes in 1992 were the same age range as Trusova and all looked (at 15) like they hadn't hit puberty yet. Same with Moceanu in 1996 through 1998. From 13 to 15. They all seem to have matured alright, and all have gone on to have children. I don't think Trusova looks starved, although I'm not privy to her day to day diet. Unless she herself says so, that she's been 'starved', I wouldn't go around throwing such accusations around. Eta: Sasha's American contemporary, Alysa Liu is also a quite young looking 14 year old. She throws quads and triple Axels in her programs, and she certainly doesn't look starved either. Jmo.
 
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Coco

Rotating while Russian!
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15,051
Let's give a shout out to group lessons and IJS, too.

For decades, the elites of the sport have largely been trained in one on one situations, competing against themselves then ... if they are lucky, getting political backing in international competition where they could be, if necessary, propped up provided they didn't mess up too badly.

IJS now rewards some messiness that necessarily comes with risk but harshly punishes pops and poor technique. This has been a huge factor in driving the technical side of the sport forward, at least when it comes to # of rotations if not height, distance and speed.

Another factor is the true competition skater's experience in practice with Eteri's team and other group training environments. This is also a huge factor in fueling the explosion of technical advancement.
 

lily

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I think my post was very clear. It took backloading jumps to beat Medvedeva. Then quads to come close to Zagitova. Not sure what you misunderstood
Not just very clear. Didn't Medvedeva backload jumps in her programs as well? What did you mean with quads and Zagitova? That for to beat Zagitova quads were needed? In my opinion, Trusova, for instance, does quads because she has physical abilities for it and because she has the passion of the discoverer. I don't think she does it only to beat Medvedeva or Zagitova.
 

missing

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Not just very clear. Didn't Medvedeva backload jumps in her programs as well? What did you mean with quads and Zagitova? That for to beat Zagitova quads were needed? In my opinion, Trusova, for instance, does quads because she has physical abilities for it and because she has the passion of the discoverer. I don't think she does it only to beat Medvedeva or Zagitova.
I don't know any figure skaters personally and know very few people who have competed athletically, but I'd be surprised to learn the best of the best athletes do it for Emily Dickinson rewards.

A person could be a great actor but unless other people see her act, there's little gratification for her. And for other people to see her act, for her to have the chance to act, she must compete with other actors through classes and auditions.

I would assume the same is true for figure skaters. Jason Brown, whose skating I love, is the best or at minimum among the best in many different aspects of competitive skating. But to be regarded as the best he must compete, and to compete successfully he must master the quad. I can't imagine that he puts his body through frequent repetition of a jump that's clearly difficult for him, or that he risks public failure each time he competes and falls, because he has the passion of the discoverer.

Trusova, or any young ambitious skater, may not target one particular skater as the one she is determined to defeat. But I assume, and I certainly don't hold this against her, that she wants the medals, the public acknowledgement of success, that go with defeating those who are currently regarded as the best.
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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This statement made me think a bit, and I would like to suggest that "Technical Stagnation" occurred in Mens Division rather than Ladies. Triple Axel was first landed by Vern Taylor in 1978, and Midori was attempting it by 1984-85. By 1991 Worlds, Midori and Tonya was having triple Axel shootout in Ladies. Considering that Dick Button landed first triple in early 1950s, it really took Mens Division skaters a long time to reach triple Axel, nearly 30 years. If the same time period is considered, the first quad Axel should have been landed around 2018. IMHO, Mens Division was pushed by Midori and Tonya into the quad age. However, while quad Sal was introduced relatively quickly (Goebel?), it took a long time before Mroz?, Shoma and Hanyu borught quad Lutz, flip and loop to Mens Division. Now, we may see a quad Lutz shootout between Shcherbakova and Trusova at 2020 Worlds, these gals may force the Mens Division to go for that quad Ax and beyond....
A lot of good points. However I don’t think Midori pushed the men toward the quad. The men were working on the quad as early as 1984-85(?) Josef Sabovcek tried it in competition and landed it but the judges said he did not fully rotate it. In 1988 Kurt Browning landed the first quad at worlds. He landed it again in 1989 but not after that (AFAIR). It was Stojko who really pushed the quad by landing it and even 4-3 combinations regularly. It inspired younger skaters to work on the quad.

The men did have a longer stagnation period, as you pointed out. However, those were the years of compulsory figures. They spent a lot of time practicing those, and jumps were not as important as they became in the 1990s.

Midori and Tonya revolutionized the sport but then the ladies stagnated. Not many were working on the 3A. Yukari did but the judges always called it UR. Nelidina did but she didn’t have anything else. It takes a winner to push others. Kristi won the OGM without a 3A, and only a 3Lz3t was enough to win. May be that’s why the ladies stuck to that formula for many years? For me at least ladies skating became boring because they were not challenging themselves with harder jumps like 3A or a quad.

Liza won the worlds with a 3A. After that we started seeing more ladies work on that jump. Now there is momentum. With Trusova and Shcherbakova landing quad lutzes, many more ladies will add at least one quad. These young ladies are more consistent than many men, so I think we will see more men landing 4Lz consistently.

IIRC Boyang Jin and Nathan Chen (a year later) started landing 4Lz3t, and it caught fire at that point. You are right that there was a long gap after MRoz’s 4Lz. If my memory is correct, Boyang was the one who pushed it and won the world bronze in 2016, with 4 or 5 quads (though not well done). Nathan took it even further. Sadly Jin lost his jumps.

I do t believe that many men can do the quad axel, but decades ago they used to say the same about the 3A, so who knows? If there is a quintuple jump, I would put my money on Trusova to land it before the men.
 

lily

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I don't know any figure skaters personally and know very few people who have competed athletically, but I'd be surprised to learn the best of the best athletes do it for Emily Dickinson rewards.

A person could be a great actor but unless other people see her act, there's little gratification for her. And for other people to see her act, for her to have the chance to act, she must compete with other actors through classes and auditions.

I would assume the same is true for figure skaters. Jason Brown, whose skating I love, is the best or at minimum among the best in many different aspects of competitive skating. But to be regarded as the best he must compete, and to compete successfully he must master the quad. I can't imagine that he puts his body through frequent repetition of a jump that's clearly difficult for him, or that he risks public failure each time he competes and falls, because he has the passion of the discoverer.

Trusova, or any young ambitious skater, may not target one particular skater as the one she is determined to defeat. But I assume, and I certainly don't hold this against her, that she wants the medals, the public acknowledgement of success, that go with defeating those who are currently regarded as the best.
Of course, Trusova is also interested in medals. But it is not the only thing what interests her. She has said it in many interviews that she wants to do something what is not done yet. Different quads she does - is that.
 

Finsta

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Of course each skaters goal is to win and beat who is one top. Whether it is Zagitova or Trusova herself. There will always be someone to beat and someone training what will be necessary to beat them.
 

LarrySK8

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454
I will applaud the accomplishments in making the revolutions and landing the jumps.

I will not comment on what will happen in the future to these skaters, but I do say, "Do it while you can."

I am curious what will become of the jumps with the introduction of a piece of potato, a singular French fry, a burger, a cutlet or chop or Heaven forbid, a glass of whole milk or a piece of cheese.

I am also curious to see how they will handle growing and maybe not being able to do the same things on the ice anymore - that will be the key to a long and happy career.

"Do it while you can."
 

Aerobicidal

Inspired by Selections
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Trusova and Eteri both deserve lots of credit (and I'm being totally serious here) for the astonishing technical skills that earned this score.

That being said, I'm going to revisit something I said in a PBP thread recently because there is a lot of speculation in this thread that's totally denying or ignoring real evidence of Eteri starving her students. And I realize I probably sound like a broken record, and this post is going to piss off several people who have posted in this thread if they don't have me on ignore, and for that I say, Not sorry!

I would like to see the staunch defenders of everything Tutberidze does and everyone she coaches acknowledge the repeated evidence that her skaters are getting:
-praised for not eating solid foods (Lipnitskaia)
-warned not to drink water (Zagitova, etc.)
-praised for subsisting on almost no food (Shcherbakova)
-unnaturally skinny because they don't eat enough (Medvedeva said this about her and Zagitova)

And there is much more evidence; this is just what I can recall and/or have read recently. I've heard more stuff e.g. concerning Panenkova but it's essentially hearsay.

I've also seen many of these skaters in person. They may be naturally thin. They may eat a lot (but I doubt it). They may have good genes. Arguments that a skater must not be starved because they a) look healthy, b) have lots of energy, c) follow a specific diet that they clearly actually don't, or d) look happy are not only unconvincing speculation but also completely insensitive to people in and out of skating who have dealt with eating disorders or disordered eating.

This is not a Russian issue. Skaters from the U.S., Canada, Finland, Sweden, etc. etc. etc. are coming out with their stories of struggle and survival. I would have the same opinion if training conditions like this were publicly acknowledged in any sport in any country--even if all the athletes training in a given situation looked healthy in person or might be naturally thin or might actually eat a lot.
 

starrynight

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Conversely I also got into trouble for suggesting this - but it's actually a much more favourable viewpoint - I think that late bloomers have been selected here. I doubt any kid who has started puberty at 11/12 is going to be admitted to this training centre. Remembering back to school, there were always those couple of kids that managed to get well into high school without a touch of puberty - when everyone around them was fully grown. I think those are the kids that Sambo 70 have selected and that's why we have girls who are getting on towards 16 and have shown no signs of growing up at all and are so small compared to your average 15, 16 year old (also a boy has been selected who is 14 and is still only 140cm tall).

But as I recall from those kids at school, it doesn't mean much in the long run. Puberty came (and usually pretty fast) and by the time we all graduated at 17, they looked the same as everyone else.
 

Tinami Amori

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18,851
Trusova, or any young ambitious skater, may not target one particular skater as the one she is determined to defeat. But I assume, and I certainly don't hold this against her, that she wants the medals, the public acknowledgement of success, that go with defeating those who are currently regarded as the best.
:lol: Trusova already said, directly and indirectly, she does not care about other girls, she wants to compete with Chen and Hanyu.
 

Tinami Amori

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18,851
I would like to see the staunch defenders of everything Tutberidze does and everyone she coaches acknowledge the repeated evidence that her skaters are getting:
-praised for not eating solid foods (Lipnitskaia)
-warned not to drink water (Zagitova, etc.)
-praised for subsisting on almost no food (Shcherbakova)
-unnaturally skinny because they don't eat enough (Medvedeva said this about her and Zagitova)
You've already posted the very same post in another thread, earlier. And i called you on your lies. Here we go again.

- Lipnitskaya had a diet/food consumption issue since childhood. Her mother chose to put her on the powder before the 2014 Olympics.

- Zagitova was not doing anything (with water) that other skaters don't do. Current interview with Kurakova (with Orser) where she said "she eats and drinks extremely little" in general, and before her last skate could not produce a urine sample because she had no water before and was dehydrated.

- Tutberidze or Shcherbakov never had discussions about food, nor any info about it, or praising her about little food. THAT'S A LIE.

- These girls not unnaturally thin. They are thin built. Med never said that about herself or Zagitova. THAT'S ANOTHER LIE.

Quite lying.
 

lily

Active Member
Messages
485
Trusova and Eteri both deserve lots of credit (and I'm being totally serious here) for the astonishing technical skills that earned this score.

That being said, I'm going to revisit something I said in a PBP thread recently because there is a lot of speculation in this thread that's totally denying or ignoring real evidence of Eteri starving her students. And I realize I probably sound like a broken record, and this post is going to piss off several people who have posted in this thread if they don't have me on ignore, and for that I say, Not sorry!

I would like to see the staunch defenders of everything Tutberidze does and everyone she coaches acknowledge the repeated evidence that her skaters are getting:
-praised for not eating solid foods (Lipnitskaia)
-warned not to drink water (Zagitova, etc.)
-praised for subsisting on almost no food (Shcherbakova)
-unnaturally skinny because they don't eat enough (Medvedeva said this about her and Zagitova)

And there is much more evidence; this is just what I can recall and/or have read recently. I've heard more stuff e.g. concerning Panenkova but it's essentially hearsay.

I've also seen many of these skaters in person. They may be naturally thin. They may eat a lot (but I doubt it). They may have good genes. Arguments that a skater must not be starved because they a) look healthy, b) have lots of energy, c) follow a specific diet that they clearly actually don't, or d) look happy are not only unconvincing speculation but also completely insensitive to people in and out of skating who have dealt with eating disorders or disordered eating.

This is not a Russian issue. Skaters from the U.S., Canada, Finland, Sweden, etc. etc. etc. are coming out with their stories of struggle and survival. I would have the same opinion if training conditions like this were publicly acknowledged in any sport in any country--even if all the athletes training in a given situation looked healthy in person or might be naturally thin or might actually eat a lot.
What sense it has to say it again and again. What to do then? Forbid all the figure skating?
 

Ruby999

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Well it’s interesting. In men’s, multiple quads didn’t crush the competition for a long time: Tim Goeble, Plushenko, Max Aaron, Boyang Jin. It wasn’t until someone like Patrick Chan came along who could do both multiple quads and had amazing artistry that it was an overwhelming advantage. But with the ladies, the judges seem willing to just let the tech side totally take over immediately.
Could this be due to the factoring of PCS in women’s figure skating relative to men’s? The scoring rules in men’s and women’s are literally different, and maybe what we are seeing now in the women’s is an unintended side-effect that will now (or eventually) end up being reviewed.
 

liv

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Eventually there will be female skaters who will skate as well as they can do quads. It just takes time. After all, it is more balanced generally in the guys so it will happen with the girls too. For now, though, we have to admire the quads that these little ones are showing us.

Trusova is athletic, fearless. She is a force of nature, so far anyway!
 

Fiero425

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1,913
Eventually there will be female skaters who will skate as well as they can do quads. It just takes time. After all, it is more balanced generally in the guys so it will happen with the girls too. For now, though, we have to admire the quads that these little ones are showing us.

Trusova is athletic, fearless. She is a force of nature, so far anyway!
I think it was about time this happened though concerned the most prolific of jumpers are barely teenagers! The women have been stunted over the years with few that even tested the bounds with 3A's or Quads! I remember when it was such a huge deal when the men were able to include the 3A into their performance! That was 30 years ago! Same for the Quad in the 90's! You have a few ladies who pushed the envelope with spectacular 3/3's like with Surya Bonaly, Tara L., & Irina S., but for the most part it made more sense to concentrate on the artistic side instead of attempting too many jumps! It took decades, but the women are showing more technical ability! Unfortunately I have to agree; with maturity, can these young jumping beans continue their success with longer and heavier bodies? Medvedeva's kept her tiny body, but there's definitely something lacking/missing behind those jumps; the overall performance is still there! She's no threat though from what little I've seen the last couple years! :judge:
 
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lily

Active Member
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485
I think it was about time this happened though concerned the most prolific of jumpers are barely teenagers! The women have been stunted over the years with few that even tested the bounds with 3A's or Quads! I remember when it was such a huge deal when the men were able to include the 3A into their performance! That was 30 years ago! Same for the Quad in the 90's! You have a few ladies who pushed the envelope with spectacular 3/3's like with Surya Bonaly, Tara L., & Irina S., but for the most part it made more sense to concentrate on the artistic side instead of attempting too many jumps! It took decades, but the women are showing more technical ability! Unfortunately I have to agree; with maturity, can these young jumping beans continue their success with longer and heavier bodies? Medvedev's kept her tiny body, but there's definitely something lacking/missing behind those jumps; the overall performance is still there! She's no threat though from what little I've seen the last couple years! :judge:
You mean Medvedeva is no threat? Who is then?
 

hanca

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9,537
I think it was about time this happened though concerned the most prolific of jumpers are barely teenagers! The women have been stunted over the years with few that even tested the bounds with 3A's or Quads! I remember when it was such a huge deal when the men were able to include the 3A into their performance! That was 30 years ago! Same for the Quad in the 90's! You have a few ladies who pushed the envelope with spectacular 3/3's like with Surya Bonaly, Tara L., & Irina S., but for the most part it made more sense to concentrate on the artistic side instead of attempting too many jumps! It took decades, but the women are showing more technical ability! Unfortunately I have to agree; with maturity, can these young jumping beans continue their success with longer and heavier bodies? Medvedev's kept her tiny body, but there's definitely something lacking/missing behind those jumps; the overall performance is still there! She's no threat though from what little I've seen the last couple years! :judge:
I don’t think that’s quite accurate. For a long time 3A was the jump in ladies that was something very rarely achievable. And yet, Asada had it way beyond her teens and so does Tuktamysheva and Nagasu did too. Now the extremely rarely achievable jump is quad lutz. However, the reason why it is currently landed only by girls who are barely teenagers is because Trusova, Scherbakova and Liu did not have time to grow up and prove that it is possible to have it at older age too. The bottom line is, those girls are the first; they haven’t had the opportunity to prove that one can do it even at the age of, let’s say 18 or 20, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that they won’t be able to. That’s all speculations. People believe that something is impossible to achieve until someone comes and achieves it. Maybe they will be able to, maybe not, but all this fake concern about their age and how hard they must be training, and what happens when puberty comes....that’s just envy. Let’s see whether can do it in a few years time and in the meantime, perhaps people could learn to contain their own negative feelings and pessimistic prognosis.
 

Fiero425

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1,913
You mean Medvedeva is no threat? Who is then?
Sorry I keep blowing that spelling of her name! A current top tennis player has one very close; Daniil Medvedev of Russia! I can't keep up with the ladies! Every time I look up, there's a new star performing jumps that we just never saw out of the ladies just a couple years ago! All I know is I wasn't impressed by Medvedeva or B. Tennell for that matter who was being fawned over after her Silver medal win in Skate America! But when facing some real international competition the following week she couldn't compete! The technical scores will rule the day when they are so prolific in doing these spectacular jump combos! :judge:
 
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MAXSwagg

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,848
I highly doubt these girls will be doing consistent and rotated quads when they’re 17 or 18+. Maybe I’ll be wrong but until then, I ain’t changing. Just like I and several others said Jason would never get a consistent quad all the way back in 2014. That has proven to be true.
 

muffinplus

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,571
Trusova and Eteri both deserve lots of credit (and I'm being totally serious here) for the astonishing technical skills that earned this score.

That being said, I'm going to revisit something I said in a PBP thread recently because there is a lot of speculation in this thread that's totally denying or ignoring real evidence of Eteri starving her students. And I realize I probably sound like a broken record, and this post is going to piss off several people who have posted in this thread if they don't have me on ignore, and for that I say, Not sorry!

I would like to see the staunch defenders of everything Tutberidze does and everyone she coaches acknowledge the repeated evidence that her skaters are getting:
-praised for not eating solid foods (Lipnitskaia)
-warned not to drink water (Zagitova, etc.)
-praised for subsisting on almost no food (Shcherbakova)
-unnaturally skinny because they don't eat enough (Medvedeva said this about her and Zagitova)
The water thing..is bs..




Medvedeva said this exact sentence when? And when was Shcherbakova praised for subsisting on no food? Post your sources please otherwise it sounds like you are spreading bs rumours



I've also seen many of these skaters in person. They may be naturally thin. They may eat a lot (but I doubt it). They may have good genes. Arguments that a skater must not be starved because they a) look healthy, b) have lots of energy, c) follow a specific diet that they clearly actually don't, or d) look happy are not only unconvincing speculation but also completely insensitive to people in and out of skating who have dealt with eating disorders or disordered eating.
What you are doing is also basically speculating...how is that not insensitive?
 
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