As the Page Turns (the Book Thread)

Cachoo

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7,122
Can anybody recommend some decent science fiction novels? I browsed the options in a bookshop but because the section was 'Sci-fi and Fantasy' had trouble quickly identifying the actual science fiction (I don't get on with fantasy). I came away with 'The Martian' by Andy Weir as I liked the film, but would like a few more options, and I long ago stopped reading the never ending parade of pastiches of TV shows.

Not that I need to add any more to my pile of un-read books, but I'm looking to vary my fiction reading a bit.
I liked "Station Eleven" though it is not as technical as "The Martian."
 

Zemgirl

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11,714
Can anybody recommend some decent science fiction novels? I browsed the options in a bookshop but because the section was 'Sci-fi and Fantasy' had trouble quickly identifying the actual science fiction (I don't get on with fantasy). I came away with 'The Martian' by Andy Weir as I liked the film, but would like a few more options, and I long ago stopped reading the never ending parade of pastiches of TV shows.
Have you read the Old Man's War series by John Scalzi? They're entertaining and owe more to Heinlein (at least the first one) than to any TV show.
 

ryanj07

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757
I just finished “From Lukov with Love.” It tells the story of a 26 year old figure skater who had success in juniors as a singles skater before struggling and turning to pairs. The story begins right after she’s been practicing alone for a year after being dumped by her pairs partner. She’s running out of time to reach her goals of being a national/world champion when she’s offered the partner of a lifetime, at a cost of course. It’s a fluffy, slow burning romance but I enjoyed the plot and figure skating references!

I’m now starting “Patron Saint of Liars” by Ann Patchett. I really liked both “Bel Canto” and “Commonwealth”, so I’m looking forward to reading another one from her.
 

JoannaLouise

Official Toaster Oven Monitor
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2,485
Can anybody recommend some decent science fiction novels? I browsed the options in a bookshop but because the section was 'Sci-fi and Fantasy' had trouble quickly identifying the actual science fiction (I don't get on with fantasy).
Have you read the Expanse series by James S. A. Corey? I read the first one and liked it, although I don't normally gravitate towards sci fi. My dad is much more into sci fi than I am; I bought him the first 3 books in the series for his birthday, and he loves them.
 

Susan1

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Interesting - I've had a book reserved for months that was originally published in 2000 and reissued in paperback in 2007 (Run for Your Life by Andrea Kane). I put that information on my books to look for list, which I would have gotten from whatever website I went to to look for her books after I read another of her stand-alones and liked it, so I reserved this one. Not even interlibrary, just our regular reserve system. It came from Bradford, which is not even in our county, but it is in our library system. It's in a mostly rural county north of here and a lot of the older books I reserve come from there eventually.
Got it today. It doesn't have any of the beginning pages. Just starts with Chapter 1 and has really small, dark print with big margins all around. I won't be able to read it at night even with the light on behind me. 464 pages and even with the little print, it's thicker than a paperback. The inside of the back and front covers are very nicely taped.
Just - weird.
 

PrincessLeppard

Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple
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26,330
If you are looking for a fast, interesting read, check out Turbulence. It's about 12 flights (it ends up going around the world) and the people who interact on the flight, or in relation to someone on the previous flight. I read it in about an hour.
 

Erin

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9,197
Has anyone read I’m Thinking of Ending Things? It starts as a rather basic story of a girl meeting her boyfriend’s parents for the first time but then it kind of turns psychological thriller partway through. I don’t really want to say too much to risk giving too much away but I’m not quite sure what to make of it. A movie is being made of it and I’m having trouble imagining how some of it will even work.

I read another Taylor Jenkins Reid book, Forever, Interrupted, while I am waiting for some other ones to come in from the library. It was only OK. The premise is a man dies two weeks after eloping and his widow deals with losing the husband she barely had. I just had a lot of trouble relating to the whirlwind romance. So unless that’s your thing, you can probably skip it.

On the non-fiction front, I’ve been taking a very long time to read Margaret McMillan’s The War That Ended Peace, about the causes of WWI, but it’s generally very good (it’s been taking a long time because it’s long and I’m busy, not because I don’t want to read it). If anyone read Robert Massie’s Dreadnought, it does cover similar ground, with some things better and some not as well. The one area it does better is cover how the Ottoman Empire and the Balkans played into everything. So I’m glad I read it for that if nothing else.
 
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millyskate

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13,152
I've just read The Salt Path by Raynor Winn. It's a good easy read that manages to hold your attention and resonate with readers without romance or murder, and that's quite an accomplishment.
 

PrincessLeppard

Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple
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26,330
Yesterday, I read The Woman Who Wasn't There in its entirety. My favorite podcast, Swindled, had done an episode about Tania Head, who was president of the 9/11 Survivor's Network, and her incredible story of survival and loss.

Except it was all lies. This book goes into much more detail than the podcast (obviously) and how she hurt and betrayed actual survivors. The super weird thing is that, unlike other fake "survivors," there was no financial motive for what she did.

Anyway, it's a fast, compelling read.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
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6,076
I just finished reading "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood.

It was a good book. Better than "The Handmaid's Tale."

But I am a little surprised that it won the Booker Prize.

I didn't think it was the best thing I ever read or anything.... :shuffle:
 

Japanfan

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21,892
I just finished reading "The Testaments" by Margaret Atwood.

It was a good book. Better than "The Handmaid's Tale."

But I am a little surprised that it won the Booker Prize.
I enjoyed it too. I especially appreciated

Getting Aunt Lydia's backstory. It explained her character much better than the 'jilted lover' scenario shown in the series. I assume that Atwood had not yet conceived of that backstory when the episode was written, but really wish they would incorporate it into the series.
 

SHARPIE

Brex-shite.
Staff member
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I usually don't talk about books until I've finished them, but I really needed a good laugh and How to Build a Girl is killing me :lol:.

Thanks for this, I got recommended it by way of @antmanb. I finished that and it’s sequel, “How to be Famous” while I was on holiday. As someone who sort of ”came of age” in the early 90s in the UK I found it hilarious too.

I had read, “Oh my God, what a complete Aisling” previously and read the next two books in that series, easy holiday reads with Irish humour.

I also read “The Man who didn’t Call” by Rosie Walsh after seeing it suggested in my Facebook feed over and over. Quite enjoyed that one. It’s apparently called “Ghosted” over in the US. Great (but sad) twist.


Someone randomly offered me a book at Zakynthos Airport today so I took it. She said she had just finished it and it was great, so has anyone here read, “Miracle Cure” by Harlen Coben? Haven’t read a print book in ages cos of my crappy eyes and dont want to get invested in it if it’s crap. I’ll look for some online reviews too.
 
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Susan1

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5,523
Every time they say Marie Yovanovitch on t.v., I remember I want to mention that I am 157th on the reserve list for Janet Evanovich's Twisted Twenty-Six that isn't even in the library yet.
 

puglover

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I am almost finished the autobiography by Elton John "ME". I would highly recommend it. He is much funnier than I imagined and so much of it is self deprecating. He is not above a few catty remarks and spills the beans on others a bit but not mean spirited or malicious - at least that was how I saw it. We know so much of the story of his life but it is nice to read it from his point of view of experiencing it.
 

puglover

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I suppose it is mostly about his life but very detailed. I would probably say I knew a fair amount about Elton John but the book, in his words, certainly does not leave much unsaid. He spends some time discussing how the music worked with Bernie and he is such a people person that most relationships are discussed in detail from his mother (eek), to Princess Diana, Freddie Mercury, GaGa, etc. - and a few he doesn't care for. I found his drug and alcohol addiction fascinating as it seems so few of his wealth and status can humble themselves enough to seek help. He talks of seeing a tragic Elvis near the end and also Michael Jackson who he describes as "mentally ill". But all in all it is a fun walk through memory lane.
 

puglover

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A number of popular mystery/police procedural writers have new books coming out in the next week or so. Michael Connelly's new book "The Night Fire" was released yesterday, I think.
 

Susan1

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A number of popular mystery/police procedural writers have new books coming out in the next week or so. Michael Connelly's new book "The Night Fire" was released yesterday, I think.
I've got Dark Sacred Night from 2018 right now.

I'm on the reserve list for Patterson's Women's Murder Club, The 19th Christmas. I forget where I am, over 100th in line anyway.
 

Susan1

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I've got Dark Sacred Night from 2018 right now.

I'm on the reserve list for Patterson's Women's Murder Club, The 19th Christmas. I forget where I am, over 100th in line anyway.
Well, I went to drop off two books (and got the Voters Guide that I used to get in the paper) and there was a new David Rosenfelt book on the 7 day shelf. I was going to write it down and put it on my list, but it's called "Dachshunds Through the Snow"! I had to get it now.

I went to put it on my list as read and saw I read Bark of Night in 2019, and this is another Andy Carpenter. He must have these ready to go for Christmas, because last year was Deck the Hounds. I read the latest book in the Doug Brock series in 2019 too.

I've got 8 other books here (they all come in at once), including The Inn which is not renewable, (three are cozies) and I'm in the middle of a Spenser book. But I'm going to go start this one now.
 

puglover

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1,781
I am only half way through "The Night Fire" but for fans of Michael Connelly this seems to be another great example of his tight compelling writing with all his best characters Bosch, Ballard, Haller and even the Lincoln included. He is doing a great job of passing the baton to a younger protagonist while not losing the impact of those we have come to know and love.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,886
@puglover I read some of his books a few years ago and enjoyed them, but I haven't read them all by any means. How important do you think all those backstories are, or does the author give you enough to follow along and enjoy the story without having read the others, or having read them years ago?
 

puglover

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1,781
@puglover I read some of his books a few years ago and enjoyed them, but I haven't read them all by any means. How important do you think all those backstories are, or does the author give you enough to follow along and enjoy the story without having read the others, or having read them years ago?
I would think you would be fine hopping in anywhere. Harry Bosch, his LA detective main character, has aged and retired now but teamed up with a young female detective who surfs and lives in a tent on Venice Beach (apparently based on a real person). There are several books in the series that feature Harry's half brother - Mickie Haller - who as a defense lawyer conducts most of his business from his Lincoln - hence the book turned movie - "The Lincoln Lawyer". As I recall, each book has it's own plot and conclusion although some of the minor characters come and go. As with many of these detective/police procedural fictional stories - part of the allure is that they work somewhat outside the law for a just and satisfying result.
 
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Susan1

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5,523
I would think you would be fine hopping in anywhere. Harry Bosch, his LA detective main character, has aged and retired now but teamed up with a young female detective who surfs and lives in a tent on Venice Beach (apparently based on a real person). There are several books in the series that feature Harry's half brother - Mickie Hallet - who as a defense lawyer conducts most of his business from his Lincoln - hence the book turned movie - "The Lincoln Lawyer". As I recall, each book has it's own plot and conclusion although some of the minor characters come and go. As with many of these detective/police procedural fictional stories - part of the allure is that they work somewhat outside the law for a just and satisfying result.
I started reading the Harry Bosch books from the beginning and then when the Mickey Haller books started, I read both series in order by year. Some just had either character and some had both. I didn't want to miss a previous continuing connection - like the stories of the ex-wives. I don't remember which book they found out that they were half-brothers. And it's been neat to watch Harry's daughter grow up chronologically.
 

Cachoo

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7,122
I've seen the film but I have never read "The Exorcist" and we are nearing Halloween. What I didn't expect was how much I would enjoy William Peter Blatty's narrative. I suppose the book was a bestseller for a reason (in addition to scaring the bejesus out of people.)
 

genevieve

drinky typo pbp, closet hugger
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36,183
Finally! I dropped into the Central Library tonight and a lone copy of Colson Whitehead's The Nickel Boys was checked into their Peak Picks section :inavoid: I put a regular copy on hold ages ago and I'm still #212 in line. :cheer2:
 

Sarah

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925
I’m reading The Boy, the mole, the Fox, and the horse by Charlie Mackesy. It’s GORGEOUS and basically an illustrated fable? But it’s full of gems and has made tear up a few times already.

You can see some of the illustrations on the author’s website: https://www.charliemackesy.com/
 

Susan1

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5,523
I ended up taking The Inn by James Patterson back to the library. I tried to read it twice and haven't gotten past the first few pages. They were spies or counter-intelligence agents or something. I read the first one set in Australia and had to force myself to finish it and didn't read the others in the series.
 

aftershocks

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15,833
This is a fascinating story I just came across on Youtube: Enemies in Love, by Alexis Clark. The book apparently came out last year, and the author is hoping for the story to be made into a film. How she found out about the story and began doing research is interesting:


The couple's son, Chris, speaks in this video:

 
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