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Cooking/Recipe Thread.

Discussion in 'Off The Beaten Track' started by becca, Jan 23, 2017.

  1. sk8pics

    sk8pics Well-Known Member

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    Canned diced tomatoes are available with no salt added, so the salt content in the whole can is quite low, maybe 45 or 59 mg sodium.
     
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  2. mackiecat

    mackiecat Well-Known Member

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    I like to use the expensive SAN Marzano tomatoes
     
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  3. Allskate

    Allskate Well-Known Member

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    It's really annoying how much salt is in prepared foods. It's also annoying how much sugar is in processed foods -- even stuff that you don't think of as sweet. I'm not really into cooking, but it's definitely better than most prepared foods, so I usually just cook stuff that's really simple.

    Reducing salt is a good thing:
    http://www.bmj.com/content/bmj/356/bmj.i6699.full.pdf

    The most frequent thing I make in the slow cooker is apple-cranberry sauce or pear sauce. I make a bunch and freeze most of it. Then I use it as a topping on Greek yogurt. I don't add any sugar, so it's pretty healthy.

    For the cranberry-apple sauce, I dump a bag of cranberries in the slow cooker. Then I core and slice a bunch of apples. I don't peel the apples. The peel largely breaks down, though it leaves some fiber. I dump the slices in, sometimes cutting them in half first. Then I add a couple of teaspoons of cinnamon and turn on the slow cooker. Once the apples have cooked down a lot, I taste to see how much more cinnamon I want to add. (I like a lot of cinnamon. Other people might just want one teaspoon.) I cook it for a long time, so I don't even blend it when it's done and I end up with chunky sauce. It's easy and yummy. And if you use sweeter apples and plenty of cinnamon, it really doesn't need any sugar.

    For pear sauce, I use cored and sliced pears and add cinnamon, a little bit of cardamon, and some ground ginger. (If you want it to be a little sweeter, use a bit of candied ginger.) Go really light on the cardamom and ginger. They can be overwhelming and they get stronger as the sauce cooks and then sits in the fridge. You can always add more, but you can't take it out.
     
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  4. becca

    becca Well-Known Member

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    Not everything has to be light. I am trying to cook more at home because overall it is healthier and I am for the most part sticking with healthier but I think something's can still be enjoyed in moderation. Besides I suspect a good home cooked desert is probably healthier than a lot of the processed foods we eat.
     
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  5. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    I like the recipe app Paprika. I know most people use Pinterest to organize their recipes, but I never been a fan. :slinkaway

    https://www.paprikaapp.com/
     
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  6. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Active Member

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    Looks really cool, I had never thought of something like that although I have been copying recipes on my computer and storing pics of finished delicacies for a few years now (I had 2 bachelor sons who needed suggestions/cooking lessons). Now maybe I will have to take 40 yrs worth of handwritten scraps of paper out of the little wooden recipe box and copy them onto my ipad :respec:
     
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  7. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    The nice thing about the app is that it uses the cloud, so you can use it on your computer and iPad. Although, I don't remember if you have to pay for both. Anyway, I copied most of my recipes into the app.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2017
  8. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    You might consider evaporated milk in place of half and half/heavy cream in that recipe, also.
     
  9. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    I am always afraid of canned and powdered milk! I consider it survivalist food. Does it really taste good?

    I have used both of them occasionally when recipes called for them with no ill effects....
     
  10. skatesindreams

    skatesindreams Well-Known Member

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    I've always thought that evaporated milk tastes like "rich" milk.
    After all, it is milk with the water removed, therefore "concentrated".

    I believe they've also done a skimmed version.
    I've never tried that, though.
     
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  11. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    Evaporated milk has certain uses in cooking. I've never drunk it plain. But I've made a bunnch of recipes with it and they've been fine. and like @skatesindreams said, it can be useful as a heavy cream substitute in some recipes. For example you can use it in pumpkin pie, instead of cream. Comes out great.
     
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  12. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    I use evaporated milk for a tuna al King and chicken stew recipes.
     
  13. Allskate

    Allskate Well-Known Member

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    So, on a whim, I bought some cranberry beans and some mayocoba beans. Now I have no idea what to do with them. Any suggestions? (I don't really like spicy food and am not a big meat eater.)
     
  14. dramagrrl

    dramagrrl Well-Known Member

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    For the poster asking for a good "light" cheesecake recipe, try this one. It obviously doesn't taste exactly like a full-fat cheesecake, but it's quite good and much, much better than most low-fat desserts.

    Anyone looking for low-fat desserts or low-fat recipes in general should check out Rose Reisman's recipes - she is the creator of the cheesecake recipe above. She has several low-fat cookbooks and her recipes, especially for low-fat desserts, are among the only "light" recipes that I would make and eat gladly and not just as a sad substitute when on a diet.

    Here is her milk chocolate fudge cake recipe that I have made many times - it's low-fat, yet sooo good!
     
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  15. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    That cheesecake recipe looks great, @dramagrrl! I will explore Rose Reisman as well. Thanks.
     
  16. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Active Member

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    "pasta e fagioli" typical farmer Italian soup. A hearty vegetarian soup using cranberry beans (already boiled before adding):

    Saute together: a big chopped onion, a clove of garlic minced together with a sprig of fresh rosemary and some sage leaves. You can also add a bit of celery if you like it. When the onion is soft, sprinkle over about 4 tbs of flour and mix well. Add 1 1/2 qt water, 1 12 oz. can chopped tomatoes and about 2 or 3 c cooked beans, pinch of salt and pepper. Mix well so that the flour does not stick to the bottom of the pan. Simmer about 15 min: the soup should be only slightly thickened. If too thick add more water since it will thicken further after adding the pasta. Add some kind of small, short pasta like ditalini or sedanini which takes only a few min to cook. Simmer until the pasta is cooked, mixing frequently so that the pasta does not stick to the bottom of the pan. Exact amounts of water, beans vary depending on how many servings you want to make. The soup should not be too dense nor too thin. For a change, I also like to add (before the simmering) a wedge of shredded cabbage or maybe some red radicchio. Serve with grated parmigiano.
     
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  17. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    I make a batch of beans every weekend for the week -I haven't tried either of those! I'm going to see if my store has mayo coba beans - they sound really good. I will see if I can find the herb for this: http://www.myhumblekitchen.com/2009/06/homemade-mexican-beans/
     
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  18. Allskate

    Allskate Well-Known Member

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    How do you prepare and use the beans?
     
  19. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    First sort through the beans to remove any small stones. Then put beans to soak in a pot full of water overnight. (You can also do a quick-boil of the beans instead, but I never use that method.) Drain beans the next morning. You want to soak them at least 8 hours.

    Put the beans back in the pot. Add water. You want the water to come up maybe 2 inches above the beans. Bring to a boil, preferably over medium heat; this takes a while, but ideally you want them to come gently to a boil; the idea is to cook them slowly but steadily. Skim any foam from surface. When beans come to a boil, reduce heat and cover or partially cover. Simmer beans for 1 to 2 hours until they are soft. Monitor heat carefully; you want them be just barely boiling, that is, you want to see some bubbles coming up gently, but you DON'T want them to be boiling hard. Test beans after an hour or so to see if they're ready.

    This is just the basic technique to cook beans plain; to make different bean soups or recipes, follow the directions.
     
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  20. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    Might want to try Beano to help with that unpleasant side effect of beans. :)
     
  21. Allskate

    Allskate Well-Known Member

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    Heh. I bought my beans at Rancho Gordo. I should have thought to look and see if they had a web site with recipes. I think I'll try their recipe for curried cranberry beans.
     
  22. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    I follow the recipe on the bag, soak overnight, clean the beans, put in a pot and simmer until tender. I add an onion cut in half to it with a bayleaf. When it is tender I use them in soup. I take two cups and mash them for a bean soup or refried beans. When they are done I toss the onion and leaf.
     
  23. Simone411

    Simone411 Covfefe! FSU Uber fan!

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    This looks really cool, and I see it can be downloaded for Windows. I don't know why I never thought of this before, but I've been adding Recipe websites to my Useful Sites page for the past few years. I have a pretty good collection now in the Chefs & Recipes category. Here's the link if anyone wishes to look through some of the websites.

    http://angie1998a.angelfire.com/AngieUsefulSitesPage9.html
     
  24. Spun Silver

    Spun Silver Well-Known Member

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    @ItalianFan, I made this tonight. It was the perfect aromatic, filling soup for a winter evening, and MUCH better than the pasta e faggiol we were served in Rome (the only other time I've had it). I love the cranberry beans and the rosemary flavor. As a vegetarian I have never known what do to with rosemary -- well, now I do. Thank you!
     
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  25. TheGirlCanSkate

    TheGirlCanSkate Well-Known Member

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    We had cabbage steaks last night - probably the best way to have cabbage. Cut cabbage into slices about an inch thick. Brush one side with olive oil then sprinkle with herbs de provence, garlic powder and pepper. Bake at 350 for 45 minutes.
     
  26. algonquin

    algonquin Well-Known Member

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    Most recipe sites download very nicely into Paprika. There are the odd sites that I have to cut and paste. Thank you for the link to your site.

    Today, I made baked beans in the crock pot. It was a spur of the moment thing, so I used canned beans. It was very yummy and very filling. I have more than enough to freeze.
     
    Last edited: Feb 2, 2017
  27. gk_891

    gk_891 Well-Known Member

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    One recipe I want to try is Guyanese pepperpot. It's a traditional Christmas meal in Guyana. But it looks like a lot of work.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_tYT7x4vv0

    And this recipe is only the beginning because once it's cooked, you have to leave it for a few days but reboil it each day before finally eating it.
     
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  28. ItalianFan

    ItalianFan Active Member

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    So pleased you liked it. My version of this soup comes from Padua and has no pork but most recipes have some kind of smoked pork, bacon/sausage etc cooked in with the beans. I prefer the aromatic vegetarian version.
    Here is another way to use fresh rosemary: saute a large onion chopped with minced garlic and the minced fresh rosemary. Add raw green beans cut in half or into smaller lengths and "the inevitable" ;>)) can of chopped tomatoes. Add also a little water, salt and pepper and cook on low heat until beans are cooked and the liquid is reduced to a sauce-like amount.

    The cabbage "steak" mentioned above intrigued me and I will have to try it. My favorite cabbage recipe is boiled cabbage and potatoes with garlic and hot pepper. Preferably Savoy cabbage. Discard the outer most tough leaves. You first boil the veggies separately, proportions 50/50. In a few spoonfuls of olive oil, brown a minced clove of garlic, a piece of hot pepper (according to taste) along with a few tablespoons of plain bread crumbs in a non stick frying pan. Be careful not to burn. When the crumb mixture is golden add the potatoes cut into small pieces or mashed along with the cabbage. Add salt. Stir and mix until the vegetables become one mass, then continue to fry until the crumb mixture makes a nice crusty bottom layer. Garlicky and hot!
     
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  29. clairecloutier

    clairecloutier Well-Known Member

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    Another yummy rosemary recipe that I found recently (in The Gift of Southern Cooking by Scott Peacock/Edna Lewis):

    Pumpkin Roasted with Rosemary and Walnuts

    1 pumpkin or butternut squash, 4-5 lbs, peeled, seeded, and cut into 1-inch cubes (about 6 cups)
    1 tsp. kosher salt
    1/2 tsp. black pepper
    4 tbsp. extra virgin olive oil
    4 large cloves garlic, thinly sliced
    1 1/4 cups walnuts or pecans, roughly chopped in large pieces
    1 tbsp. chopped rosemary leaves (or more to taste)

    Preheat oven to 400F. Toss pumpkin with salt, pepper, and olive oil. Spread in single layer on baking sheet. Bake about 20 min, or until pumpkin just begins to color on edges and becomes tender. Sprinkle garlic, walnuts, and rosemary over pumpkin. Toss gently to mix and coat with oil. Roast 10 minutes longer. Check seasoning & serve.
     
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