Favorite Movie Scenes

VGThuy

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41,036
I thought I'd create a thread where we share all of our favorite specific movie scenes from some of our favorite films. Don't watch my scenes if you don't want to be spoiled.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=-XHjechNzMo

This scene from Lady Snowblood I think is a perfect example of using violent choreography to show a character's emotion and motivation in a scene. Quentin Tarantino was inspired by this scene when he created Kill Bill and I think it's obvious what he borrowed from this film.

I'm going to cheat and provide two clips from Frances Ha. I fell in love with Greta Gerwig in this movie and I really do think it's my favorite movie of the past decade. It's the film that has most resonated with me and still stays with me.

This scene of Frances dancing in the street near Chinatown in New York to David Bowie's "Modern Love" is really grabbed my attention:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4n9MLbpmyWE

Fun fact: I tried recreating this scene once much to the embarrassment of my husband, little brother, and other friends.

Here's another scene from Frances Ha where she explains what she wants out of life. It's slightly embarrassing, but so winning and so real and something I've felt in the past:

https://youtu.be/x-b2Y8ldxZk

My favorite director Hou Hsiao-Hsien directed two movies that are on my must-see lists. One is from the film Three Times where he directs three short films about love starring the two same actors playing three different characters in 1966, 1911, and 2005. The segments are called "A Time for Love", "A Time for Freedom", and "A Time for Youth". The first segment is is traditional Taiwanese Hokkien, the second segment is almost a complete silent film with the dialogue entirely written out, and the third segment is in modern Taiwanese Mandarin.

The scene I'm going to share is from "A Time for Love" near the end where a man in Taipei comes back from army training and has one day of free time. He looks for a woman who has he has connected with at a pool hall in a small town in Taiwan but finds out she no longer works there. So he spends the rest of the day looking for her. At first he is thwarted and can't find her only to find out where she works at and he finally sees her. The woman is seemingly aloof earlier on, but when she sees he has shown up at the random pool hall in a totally different town that she never told him about, she can't help but be giddy and cannot hide her pure happiness in seeing that he found her. Of course by the time he finds her, it's very late and he's due back at the army base in Taipei at 9am the next morning, but they share a meal and a connection and I am simply in love with this scene:

https://youtu.be/isMhRqNCt6A

The above scene isn't translated but she simply says he missed the last train and they might as well wait for the bus (meaning she probably invited him to spend the night with her). The 1960s song "Rain and Tears" by Aprhodite's Child (with pianist Vangelis) segues into the 1911 story in a brilliant anachronistic way which is a wholly different story of a rich patron and a "flower girl" (high priced prostitute who has semi-monogamous relationships with their patrons) who is practically a slave and can only gain freedom from a rich patron or becoming a concubine.

Fun fact: Three Times was a major inspiration for Barry Jenkins when he made Moonlight with the idea of telling one story in three separate chapters.

And here is my all-time favorite scene, the opening of Hou Hsiao-Hsien's Millenium Mambo:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tNEa6sH-zY

This opening scene is just so hypnotic. This movie was simply Hou's observation of late 90s Taiwan as he saw it and the way the youth were sort of just swimming through life without rhyme and reason.

What are some of your favorite film scenes?
 
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Japanfan

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25,568
This classic scene from Five Easy Pieces.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdIXrF34Bz0

Many years later Michael Douglas did a sort of spin on that in 'Falling Down' (think that was the title), where he went crazy with a shotgun in McDonalds because he wanted breakfast at 11:01, and they stopped serving breakfast at 11:00.

This, from The Straight Story, about the guy who drove across a state in a lawn mower to visit his brother:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SfGeYdOeh3w

I'm sure I'll add to this post in days to come as more scenes come to mind.

One I can't find online is from 'Eyes Wide Shut', where the Nicole Kidman character gets high and says to her Tom Cruise character husband: "So, just because I'm a beautiful woman, everyone wants to **** me?" And then confesses that she's had sexual fantasies.
 
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cocotaffy

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One of my favorite movie is 3-iron from Kim Ki Duk and the final scene is just incredible with the music of Natasha Atlas. It's such a poetic movie https://youtu.be/Pug_kqlcYRQ?t=2m48s

Then another of my all time favorite is Departures whose soundtrack by Joe Hisaishi is a character in itself. The scene sounds grim because it's about a funeral ritual but when I watched this it was the first and only time I felt peaceful about the prospect of death: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MyMFXW57VQ8

Cyclo from Tran Anh Hung, the nightclub scene with Radiohead's Creep. I remember watching this alone in a small cinema in Paris and it really hit me at the time, the music, the movie, it had a big impression on me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHwm34cCk6k

In another totally different style, the playground scene in Birds. No need for CGI, just great editing work and you have one of the most chilling scenes in movie history: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ydLJtKlVVZw
And of course, Kubrick, on of my favorite director and this amazingly tense scene from the Shining of the little boy riding his three wheel bike for the longest time, with the noise of the wheels on the wooden floor interrupted only by the presence of carpets ( the colors of those carpets !). Till the last vision in this huge and surreal corridor: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cy7ztJ3NUMI

That's all for now, but I'm sure to come up with more. Great idea for a thread. Thanks.
 

snoopy

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12,274
One of mine is this scene from pretty woman. Not the shopping scenes but the in between manager scene. It's not great art but who wouldn't want a Barnard Thompson to pull a string for you when your feeling down and out. And it happening when you least expect it.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=91ET3y4q5Os
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, T&M, P&C
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How do you copy one specific scene out of a 2-hour movie on you tube?
 

snoopy

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12,274
Google words for that scene - odds are somebody already did that for you. I googled “one dollar bet trading places” and the right clip came up.
 

MsZem

I see the sea
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18,531
Baby Mine in Dumbo:fragile:

Three movie endings that I like:

Working Girl, when Tess (Melanie Griffith) calls her friend (Joan Cusack) to tell her where she is. This clip doesn't have the camera panning out to show all the buildings, but the call itself is there.

Gangs of New York, with the time lapse of the cemetery and the skyline. Wow.

Hope and Glory - Bill has to go back to school, only to discover that it had been bombed in the Blitz.

Israeli movies: the funeral scene in Operation Grandma is :rofl: It may only be funny if you're Israeli, though, and I can't find it on Youtube.

Also :rofl: - the preview of The Dueling Cavalier in Singing in the Rain.
 

gk_891

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4,261
I love this scene from Autumn Sonata. You can really see what the relationship is like between the mother and daughter characters (the movie is about a mother and daughter who have been estranged for many years but have recently reunited).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxA94uSQ-t0

As unlikeable as I found Charlotte in this scene (Ingrid Bergman's character), I do have to admit that her interpretation of that Chopin prelude is absolutely brilliant.

But that scene was only one of many brilliant scenes in what was a fascinating movie, at least for me. There's another scene that towards the end of the movie that made a big impression on me where you see Eva sitting by herself in a cemetery and you can hear her inner thoughts and she also starts talking to her dead son.

And of course there is the famous scene from Sophie's Choice. I didn't care for the movie overall but this scene is very effective due to Meryl's performance.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DZ9bht5H2p4
 
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gk_891

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4,261
Cyclo from Tran Anh Hung, the nightclub scene with Radiohead's Creep. I remember watching this alone in a small cinema in Paris and it really hit me at the time, the music, the movie, it had a big impression on me. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IHwm34cCk6k

I loved Cyclo! So many memorable scenes and that scene was indeed one of them.

Another movie that made a huge impression on me was Pixote A Lei Do Mais Fraco. It's a brutally compelling film about young children who are institutionalized in Brazil. The ending in particular is something that has stayed with me although there were some other scenes that have also stayed with me. I've copied and pasted 2 reviews which helps to explain both the movie in general and the ending which is below (I've italicized the parts about the ending). As just watching the ending in itself probably won't make sense unless you know what happened before. SPOILERS!

Pixote A Lei Do Mais Fraco (ending)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pLD65zDDKxQ

Review by Pauline Kael
A shockingly lyrical Brazilian film about the life of abandoned children who learn to pick pockets and grab purses and hustle-it's their only way of surviving. Thrown into a reformatory, the 10-year-old Pixote watches as several of the larger boys gang-rape a kid not much older than he is, and his truculent baby face is indifferent, but he's a little camera taking it all in. A group of boys, including Pixote, break out, and he and three others snatch enough purses and wallets to make their way to Rio de Janeiro and begin dealing cocaine. Outsmarted by the adult criminals, the kids buy an aging, drunken prostitute from a pimp and go into business with her: she brings men home, and they rob them at gunpoint. As the director, Hector Babenco (who appears in a prologue), sees it, Pixote is a snub-nosed infant asserting his wants, and when they're denied he changes into a baby gangster-a runt Scarface, who kills innocently, in the sense that he doesn't understand the enormity of the crime. The thesis is too pat, but two of the characters-Lilica (Jorge Juliãno), a flamingly nelly 17-year-old transvestite homosexual, and the whore Sueli, the whoriest whore imaginable (Marília Pera)-transcend it. Dusky and aquiline-faced, Marília Pera has an Anna Magnani-like presence-horrifying and great. Her display of passion wipes the little non-actor kids off the screen. She's the whore spawned out of men's darkest imaginings, and in her scenes the movie achieves a raw garish splendor.

Review by Roger Ebert
Fathered by strangers, abandoned by their mothers, thrown away by society, the children of "Pixote" live by their wits on the cruel streets of Sao Paolo in Brazil. They improvise their own families, forming shifting alliances based on need, fear and even love. Their economy is based on the only two markets open to them, those for sex and drugs. Many of them are so young, they only vaguely understand sex; they are hardened to sights and experiences they even don't comprehend.

Hector Babenco's 1981 film was created in the spirit of Italian neo-realism; his child actors are the real thing, discovered in the streets and essentially playing themselves. The adult characters are mostly played by professional actors, but these performances coming from completely different backgrounds seem to feed from the same desperation. There is no answer to the problem of the millions of homeless children, no remedy, no hope. It is not surprising to learn that Fernando Ramos da Silva, the illiterate 11-year-old who plays Pixote, returned to the streets and was killed by police bullets in 1987.

The movie is told in a loosely structured, episodic style. Not every scene pays off neatly or makes a smooth connect with the next one. The jagged tone seems appropriate for these lives, which have no continuity, no balance point, no reason for something to happen today, tomorrow or ever.

In a society of children and adolescents who have no homes and no money, crime is the natural way of survival, but they're not very good at it (the gangs in "City of God," made 20 years later, are much more sophisticated). Their approach to crime, as to life, is thoughtless improvisation; they respond to situations, but have no control over them. We sense that Babenco isn't leading his characters but following them, and scenes don't always have a point or a purpose because neither do these lives.

We meet Pixote when he is rounded up along with other street kids after the murder of a judge. Society demands the appearance of justice and revenge, and so the murder will be pinned on one of them -- never mind if it's the right one or not. Some fairly confusing dialogue indicates that one of these kids may have been involved in the crime, or witnessed it, but solving the crime is not the point of the movie, and the police despair of ever knowing who the real killer is. The code of silence, enforced by the possibility of death, is complete.

The kids are taken to a reformatory. Inside would be better for them than outside, if it weren't for the brutality of the guards, the corruption of the staff and the crimes of one prisoner against another (on his first night, Pixote witnesses a rape).

Faces and characters form out of the crowd. The most striking is Lilica (Jorge Juliao), a transvestite whose sexual nature is accepted casually by the others. He's older -- 17, in a nation where he can't be charged with a crime until he's 18. Then there are Dito (Gilberto Moura), looking cherubic under a crown of curly hair, and Chico (Edilson Lino).

Without agreeing to it, discussing it or even really noticing it, they form a group based on their shared vulnerability and trust. When things get dangerous inside the reformatory, and it's clear some of them may die at the hands of brutal guards or cops with secrets to hide, they escape and return to the streets. It's not that hard: they go through an open window to a rooftop. (One kid, with a leg brace, decides not to escape: "It's better for me here.")

We can anticipate, more or less, what happens in the first half of the film, which is not a million miles from the poverty and crime in, say, Oliver Twist. The second half of the film is a descent into hell; indeed, the dominant tones become red and orange instead of the muted drabness of the earlier scenes.

Lilica is picked up by a sometime client or lover or pimp named Cristal (Tony Tornado). He can wholesale them some drugs. They snatch purses to raise the cash, prowling the city streets like a wolf pack. They ride the rails to Rio to sell the drugs, are victimized by their customers and end up living with a deteriorating prostitute named Sueli (Marilia Pera, who won the best actress award from the National Society of Film Critics).

She is the fifth member of the family, but then it begins to shrink. Two of the boys are killed, and Lilica walks out one night -- jealous because the prostitute has seduced a boy he cares for. Even earlier, Lilica was uneasy around Sueli, and indeed, he seems more feminine, more maternal, more caring than the hard woman of the streets. Lilica has a self-awareness the others lack, sighing at one point, "What can a queer expect from life?" Pixote replies, "Nothing, Lilica," but in his world no one can expect anything. Then Lilica is gone, and at the end, everyone is gone, except for Sueli and Pixote.

Pixote has obtained a gun, and he uses it. How, I will not reveal, except to say that it is shocking how impassive he seems after killing two people, one by mistake. His wide, open eyes don't seem to register the result of his actions, and his face doesn't seem to register feeling about it -- until, hours later, sitting at the foot of Sueli's bed, watching TV, he throws up. And then we understand the agony inside of Pixote, the pain that is unbearable because he lacks the experience and even the words to deal with it.

The closing scenes are powerful, sad and eventually heartless. They show without compromise the depth of Pixote's need and the totality of his loneliness. Much depends on the character of Sueli, who in the second half of the movie is really the dominant presence (Pixote throughout most of the movie is as much observer as participant).

The streets have given Sueli a hardness and coldness that close her off from real emotion, even though as an experienced prostitute she can fake it -- sometimes with clients, but more often in her own life, as if she's trying to deceive herself. She has a remarkable scene, late one night when she should be in torment but gets drunk and then dances in the headlights of a stolen car, remembering that she was truly happy when she was a strip-tease performer.

Then comes her last scene with Pixote, which is so sorrowful and cruel it is barely watchable. He is still, after everything, a little boy. Sueli has recently performed an abortion on herself (she explains it in cruel detail to Pixote), but now, just for a moment, she imagines a life in which she will return to her town and family, and Pixote will be like her son. Pixote turns to her breast, not in a sexual way, but in need, and we see the child who has always hungered for a mother he never had.

It is a hushed, sacred moment, and in another film, it would be the last shot. A similar scene concludes John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath-- the novel, not the movie. But then Sueli hardens, and all the anger of her pitiful life focuses on Pixote. At this point the film fits the classical definition of tragedy, which requires the death of a hero. But Pixote is not a hero; his life has been a half-understood reaction to events. And he doesn't die, except in his heart and soul.


If you want to watch the entire movie, it's here with English subtitles.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZRv91ucFcU

Two other scenes that stick out in my mind are the scenes where Sueli happily reminices about being a go-go girl at a dance club (as Ebert mentions above). But then shortly after that, she sorrowfully remembers being kicked out of that club while slow dancing with Dito in her living room. Very powerful stuff. And Marilia Pera gave an amazing performance as Sueli. She's only in the last 30-40 minutes or so but she completely dominates every scene that she's in.
 
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gk_891

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4,261
My favourite Zhang Yimou-Gong Li collaboration was/is Raise the Red Lantern. I thought this scene (towards the end) was beautifully done although I admit that it won't make much sense watching it on its own. Still, I loved the way the camera very slowly zoomed in on Songlian and when the camera cuts to a closeup of her face, you can see the dull shock from what had happened before.

Raise the Red Lantern scene
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhXJUNqiA2s

Some others:

The Shining (Here's Johnny!)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDpipB4yehk

Blade Runner 2049 - Luv confronts Joshi (I wasn't a big fan of this movie but I thought this scene was effective)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=viLod_tzRZg

This scene from the Brady Bunch Sequel always puts a smile on my face.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DWda_frOcQ8

This scene from Carrie (the 1976 version) also made me laugh.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nbv93h1MUMM

A personal favourite movie of mine is Return to Oz. My favourite scene is the part where Dorothy tries to run away from the asylum where her aunt and uncle have sent her to but I can't find a clip of that. But the scene below was also effective. Dorothy meets a witch named Princess Mombi who has a special ability.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QcrkU7Dn2ww
 
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Vagabond

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So many to choose from! :COP: There was a thread a few years ago about favorite movie endings. I won't repeat anything from there. Go subscribe if necessary and track it down in the Archives. :HA!:

I have marked linked to scenes that can be watched without risk of spoiling thusly: :watch:

Watch the ones without popcorn at your own risk!

In alphabetical order by movie:

Before Sunset
Car scene (Part I) (Part II)
The entire movie takes place in real time. While you should watch the whole movie, this sequence sums it up.

Call Me By Your Name
Last scene
All done in one amazing shot, taking the movie from excellence to greatness.

Chicago
When You're Good to Mama:watch:
Casting Queen Latifah in the part was sheer genius.
Diva
Chase scene :watch:
The greatest movie chase scene ever filmed?

Down With Love
Socks scene :watch:

The English Patient
Cathedral paintings :watch:

Fanny and Alexander
Christmas song:watch:

In the Mood for Love
Mrs. Chan and Mr. Chow have dinner together at a restaurant and walk home
In this scene, they seemingly ask each other about her bag and his tie, but they are really trying to share information of a very personal nature.
You can find the subtitles (at least in Google Chrome), but they aren't quite in sync with the action.


The Lives of Others
Elevator scene :watch:
(If the OP can cheat, why can't I? :sneaky:) Ending :wuzrobbed :)

Midnight in Paris
Three Surrealists and one normal guy walk into a bar:watch:

Vertigo
Who shot who in The Embarcadero in August 1879? :watch:
 
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Japanfan

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25,568
My favourite Zhang Yimou-Gong Li collaboration was/is Raise the Red Lantern. I thought this scene (towards the end) was beautifully done although I admit that it won't make much sense watching it on its own. Still, I loved the way the camera very slowly zoomed in on Songlian and when the camera cuts to a closeup of her face, you can see the dull shock from what had happened before.

Raise the Red Lantern scene
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhXJUNqiA2s

I haven't thought of Zhang Yimou-Gong Li for quite some time, loved all of their films. Perhaps missed some in recent years - if so, please advise.

The one that stands out for me the most is Zu Dou, about 'forbidden passion'. I'll never forget the image of the dye mill owner/ruler being raised up high in a basket after becoming paralyzed (not exactly a favorite scene), when the two lovers could finally be together.
 
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gk_891

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4,261
I haven't thought of Zhang Yimou-Gong Li for quite some time, loved all of their films. Perhaps missed some in recent years - if so, please advise.

The one that stands out for me the most is Zu Dou, about 'forbidden passion'. I'll never forget the image of the dye mill owner/ruler being raised up high in a basket after becoming paralyzed (not exactly a favorite scene), when the two lovers could finally be together.

Have you seen Red Sorghum or The Story of Qiu Ju? Both are good but I admit that The Story of Qiu Ju was (to me) very tedious at first until the very end. I honestly thought The Story of Qiu Ju was probably Gong Li's greatest performance.

Zhang Yimou and Gong Li reunited in 2006 for Curse of the Golden Flower but I wasn't impressed with it. They worked together again in 2014 for a movie called Coming Home but I have yet to see that one.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coming_Home_(2014_film)
 

clairecloutier

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14,574
Great thread idea!

Mine is kinda simple, but I watch It's a Wonderful Life every year just to see the scene of George dressing down Mr. Potter at the Board of Directors meeting after his father died.

We also watch It's a Wonderful Life every year at Christmas (it's a tradition in my husband's family). My husband said some of his favorite scenes are 1) the scene toward the beginning when George has dinner with his father and Harry and talks about his future and 2) the scene where Potter offers George a job and George considers taking it before coming to his senses. I also like the scenes toward the end, where George finds out what would have happened if he had never been born. (We are always LOL at the scene with Mary as an "old-maid" librarian--apparently, a fate worse than death in the 1940s!! :lol::biggrinbo)


Three movie endings that I like:

Working Girl, when Tess (Melanie Griffith) calls her friend (Joan Cusack) to tell her where she is. This clip doesn't have the camera panning out to show all the buildings, but the call itself is there.

I like that scene too. There are so many good ones in that movie. I actually love the scene moments before that, when Tess walks into her new job and automatically goes to sit at the secretary's desk. And then her new secretary comes in and tells her she's in the wrong spot. Brilliant.

I also like some of the early scenes in that movie that show Tess in all her Staten Island glory of big hair, short skirts, etc. That scene in the recruiter's office (I don't remember the exact lines)--"You ask any of them, they know Tess McGill has called some good ones." "I don't think they'll be singing your praises, Tess."

My favourite Zhang Yimou-Gong Li collaboration was/is Raise the Red Lantern.

There are so many indelible moments in Raise the Red Lantern that I still remember, even though it's been like 20 years since I saw the film. Like I remember the scene when the main character meets the master's oldest son by First Mistress. You can tell there's an instant spark and attraction between these 2 young people--but it's utterly impossible because, in the world they live in, she is literally the property of his elderly father. The scene is like a razor, freshly cutting into the wound that is her life. I also vividly remember the scenes when she first meets Second Mistress (who initially appears so kind/sympathetic) and gaily glittering Third Mistress.
 

gk_891

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4,261
There are so many indelible moments in Raise the Red Lantern that I still remember, even though it's been like 20 years since I saw the film. Like I remember the scene when the main character meets the master's oldest son by First Mistress. You can tell there's an instant spark and attraction between these 2 young people--but it's utterly impossible because, in the world they live in, she is literally the property of his elderly father. The scene is like a razor, freshly cutting into the wound that is her life. I also vividly remember the scenes when she first meets Second Mistress (who initially appears so kind/sympathetic) and gaily glittering Third Mistress.

Yes, that scene where she meets First Mistress' son was amazing. Songlian's face (which was usually cold and hardened) would soften whenever she encountered him. The tension and chemistry between those 2 was incredible even though they barely interact.

Another amazing scene is right after she first meets First Mistress' son as she goes looking for her father's flute. When she can't find it, she calls her servant Yan'er and accusses her of stealing it. This leads to Songlian storming into Yan'er's room and finding not only lighted lanterns but also a doll with pins and needles stuck in it.
 

gk_891

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4,261
One movie that had one of the most extraordinary endings I've ever seen was a Polish movie called Korczak. SPOILERS!!!

Janusz Korcak was an educator and author who was also the director of a Jewish orphanage in Warsaw, Poland. When Poland was occupied by Nazi Germany, Korczak was granted numerous opportunities to flee the country but he refused to leave his children behind. By 1942, Korczak and his children were sent to a concentration camp where they all eventually died.

What this ending (which runs for about 10 minutes) shows is Korczak and his children being sent to the camps. But it also shows a rumour that floated around for years that Korczak and his children managed to escape and live even though that was probably wishful thinking (sadly).

https://youtu.be/cyBwsoD-AV0?t=6125

ETA - the link below is a better one as it has English subtitles
https://vimeo.com/43898994
 
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NinjaTurtles

No lamb chop, so don’t you fork my peas
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The ending to The Truman Show. The surrealist setting. The pairing of the weight of a conversation between man and his creator with the on-to-the-next attitude of the audience. The soundtrack. :swoon:

Vertigo was already mentioned, but just want to mention it again and it's wonderful use of color. Frances Ha is also gorgeous and I have a complicated relationship with mumblecore films! Speaking on dancing, love Fellini's 8 1/2 dancing scene.

I won't link it, since most links require age confirmation, but the introduction and first ultra violence scene of A Clockwork Orange is classic Kubrick. Visually amazing, but unsettling. The scenes on the station/in space in 2001 A Space Odyssey are also a standout.

Another intro I like is the O Saya sequence in Slumdog Millionaire.

My favorite shoot out scene: The Grand Budapest Hotel.

The last memory being erased in Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
.

I'm just now realizing that I listed two Jim Carrey scenes, weird. :lol:

Sentimental favorite, the ice dance scene from Edward Scissorhands.
 

gk_891

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4,261
An interesting scene from Yi Yi.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uxKZlgEXQJA

Amadeus
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vNaXQQbcgw0

Immortal Beloved (wasn't a big fan of this movie but this scene was very well done - you can see how Beethoven is struggling with his loss of hearing but that struggle led to such amazing music)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=524VlYD0PVw

Dangerous Liasons (final scenes)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=02Vo_Q0nt-k

Salaam Bombay (when Krishna escapes form the juvenile detention centre)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=do9Dm3sHiSY
 
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cocotaffy

Fetchez la vache... mais fetchez la vache !
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7,832
Opening scene in Rear Window: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I5It0nmoYE4
Amazing way to set up the movie and the protagonists from the get go.

Omaha Beach scene in Saving Private Ryan. I remember watching this on a huge screen when it came out and it was like I got punched in the guts. The realism of the horror of those men not even setting one foot out of those boats, the noises , the visuals... https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DSKerypwUDM

One of the most haunting and disturbing scenes, the russian roulette in the Deer Hunter : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHtQwxKaofk the other one I'll put under
I don't know how I forgot to include this one earlier because it was a favorite when I was younger, the globe scene in the Dictator from Charlie Chaplin. There are actually so many scenes from this movie but I guess this was the most iconic. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YqyQfjDScjU

The funeral scene in Darjeeling limited, the music from the Kinks is just brilliantly fitting, it's simple yet very moving https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjtlJGEBEQo

Jules and Jim run over the bridge scene. The freedom experienced here by the three characters is what one can just hope for. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ePYGlLJ8nM
 
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MsZem

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One movie that had one of the most extraordinary endings I've ever seen was a Polish movie called Korczak. SPOILERS!!!

Janusz Korcak was an educator and author who was also the director of a Jewish orphanage in Warsaw, Poland. When Poland was occupied by Nazi Germany, Korczak was granted numerous opportunities to flee the country but he refused to leave his children behind. By 1942, Korczak and his children were sent to a concentration camp where they all eventually died.
I don't think that can really be considered a spoiler. The fate of Dr. Korczak and his children is a matter of historical record. Treblinka was essentially non-survivable.

I probably wouldn't be able to watch such the movie.
 

gk_891

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I don't think that can really be considered a spoiler. The fate of Dr. Korczak and his children is a matter of historical record. Treblinka was essentially non-survivable.

I probably wouldn't be able to watch such the movie.

For sure. But in case anyone didn't know about Korczak and what became of him, I guess what I mentioned could be considered 'spoilers' to a certain extent.

It's a brutal movie to watch but that ending was just so beautifully done to the point where I honestly had no words.
 

gk_891

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