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Olympic figure skater John Baldwin Jr. & his father under federal indictment in San Diego

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Each year, just before April 15, a high-profile story about tax evasion or under reporting or some other tax infraction hits the news cycle. Unfortunately for the Baldwins, 2018 is an Olympic year, so their tax issues have more PR appeal for the IRS than in a non-Olympic year.
(Okay, unfortunate for the Baldwins that they allegedly did not follow relevant tax laws, but certainly his Olympic history makes the story catchier for publication.)
 

Yazmeen

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I'm no major fan of John Baldwin, but may I point out one thing for those who claim it was tacky of John to bring up the Olympics? The person who was interviewing John may have brought it up first. The publication certainly exploited the image of the Olympics for this story along with John.
 

icie

Keeping up appearances
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I'm no major fan of John Baldwin, but may I point out one thing for those who claim it was tacky of John to bring up the Olympics? The person who was interviewing John may have brought it up first. The publication certainly exploited the image of the Olympics for this story along with John.
According to the article:
John Baldwin Jr. appeared in federal court this week for a motion-setting hearing before Judge Thomas J. Whelan. On the lapel of his suit jacket, the Escondido resident wore an Olympic pin with the five interlocking rings.
http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sports/sd-sp-john-baldwin-federal-indictment-20180412-story.html
 

Japanfan

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I think the Olympics is absolutely completely irrelevant to his case. Marching into court with the Olympic pin and pointing out that he was an Olympian to the press is tacky as hell and I doubt that any judge or juror is going to react in any way other than massive eye rolling. And his words do indeed imply that he thinks there is some connection between being an Olympian and being innocent or at least that pointing out his past is somehow helpful to him.
He is probably playing on the perception that some members of the public see Olympians in general as wholesome, upstanding, responsible persons of integrity - role models to the rest of us. This is not necessarily true, but some do have that perception.

“Olympians,” Baldwin Jr. said afterward, “can break the law. I just don’t happen to be one of those Olympians.”
I find this a strange thing to say. Who exactly does "those Olympians" refer to? Maybe he means even Olympians can break the law.

But in any case emphasizing that he's an Olympian is really beside the point.

All in all, I think the statement makes Baldwin Jr. sound desperate.
 
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Yazmeen

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According to the article:
John Baldwin Jr. appeared in federal court this week for a motion-setting hearing before Judge Thomas J. Whelan. On the lapel of his suit jacket, the Escondido resident wore an Olympic pin with the five interlocking rings.
http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/sports/sd-sp-john-baldwin-federal-indictment-20180412-story.html
And that confirms that he was the first one to bring up the Olympics? Does that mean everyone who wears an American flag pin on their lapel brings up the flag or other message or patriotism automatically when they wear it? No, it doesn’t. Again, I don’t really care about Baldwin but those of you fuming over him exploiting himself as an Olympian do not really know if he brought the Olympics up first or if the reporter did. Period.
 

madm

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The moral of the story for anyone who sells something for large amounts of cash (cars, jewelry, coins, etc) is that you should report it on your tax return and not try to avoid taxes by making series of small (under $10,000) deposits into your bank account. If you sell items to a reputable place (e.g. jeweler, coin dealer), the dealer will report that sale to the government. And banks may also report suspicious cash deposits if there are many of them. The only way to hide cash sales is to keep the money as cash and spend it over time for one's living expenses (e.g. gas, groceries). Depositing the money at a bank leaves a paper trail.
 

Erin

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The moral of the story for anyone who sells something for large amounts of cash (cars, jewelry, coins, etc) is that you should report it on your tax return and not try to avoid taxes by making series of small (under $10,000) deposits into your bank account. If you sell items to a reputable place (e.g. jeweler, coin dealer), the dealer will report that sale to the government. And banks may also report suspicious cash deposits if there are many of them. The only way to hide cash sales is to keep the money as cash and spend it over time for one's living expenses (e.g. gas, groceries). Depositing the money at a bank leaves a paper trail.
I'm not sure why this is the moral of the story. There is still nothing to suggest that the Baldwins have been charged with tax evasion. It's not to say that they couldn't be in the future, but the charge is said to be "failure to comply with financial reporting obligations" which is not the same thing.
 
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I'm not sure why this is the moral of the story. There is still nothing to suggest that the Baldwins have been charged with tax evasion. It's not to say that they couldn't be in the future, but the charge is said to be "failure to comply with financial reporting obligations" which is not the same thing.
Alex Baldwin is a very unfunny actor and should of been locked up years ago for dis-gracing the nation, no surprise his cousin John has been committing tax fraud for decades! The criminal element in skating is off the charts, my wife and I would not of been surprised if some random pair man winds up behind bars for drunken illegality next!
 
Thread starter #75

Sylvia

Club competition season is underway...
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Jack Gallagher brought up Rena Inoue in relation to the San Diego Union-Tribune article in his latest "Ice Time" column (4/17/18):
Sometimes in life you can only shake your head at the obstacles people have to overcome — physical, financial, educational, etc.
Former Japan and U.S. skater Rena Inoue, who beat lung cancer back in 1998, has indirectly been confronted with another, it was learned last week. <snip>...
Inoue, who represented Japan at the 1992 (in pairs with Tomoaki Koyama) and 1994 (in singles) Olympics, and the U.S. in 2006 (in pairs with Baldwin), has not been implicated in any of the alleged wrongdoing. However, as the mother of two young daughters, the thought of her husband going to prison must be deeply upsetting.
...
Inoue, now 41, is a native of Nishinomiya, Hyogo Prefecture.
Attempts by Ice Time to reach Inoue, who became a U.S. citizen in 2005, for comment were unsuccessful.
 
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The hole Baldwin family pretends to be "American", they are evil socialites who don't pay taxes and now the IRS is going to put them all in the slammer! The flag pin they wear it to throw off the authorities but thank god it did not work in this case!
:lol: I love the idea of John jr being a “socialite” because all I can imagine is him with his trumpian comb-over in a Real Housewives type intro where he spins around with a champagne flute in one hand and deliveres his tag line “Olympians can break the law. I just don’t happen to be one of those Olympians.”
 
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:lol: I love the idea of John jr being a “socialite” because all I can imagine is him with his trumpian comb-over in a Real Housewives type intro where he spins around with a champagne flute in one hand and deliveres his tag line “Olympians can break the law. I just don’t happen to be one of those Olympians.”
I still think that quote reads like "Celebrities can speed. I just don't happen to be one of those celebrities". To me inferring that a special group can speed and get away with it yet he can't. Anyway, he's dumb as a brick, and probably isn't nuanced enough...
 
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:lol: I love the idea of John jr being a “socialite” because all I can imagine is him with his trumpian comb-over in a Real Housewives type intro where he spins around with a champagne flute in one hand and deliveres his tag line “Olympians can break the law. I just don’t happen to be one of those Olympians.”
ROFLMAO. Talk about "stirring" the pot!!!!!!!!

Now that Reena Ineuo is back in Japan, I bet she is making chow main in her pot and it's real spicy served up with a glass of hot saki! Exotic yum yum yum!
 

feraina

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There’s no mention of the IRS or taxes at all in the article, so people shouldn’t jump to conclusions about tax evasions.

Their shop is not that far from my parents’ house. I had no idea they all lived/worked in the area. Reading their Google reviews, they seem to be a bit disorganized, not always getting the titles together quickly, or having two different people promising a car to two different buyers. Wouldn’t be surprised they were just disorganized with their financial reporting as well.
 

Erin

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There’s no mention of the IRS or taxes at all in the article, so people shouldn’t jump to conclusions about tax evasions.
There is actually a brief mention of the IRS (so brief I missed it on first read and someone else had to point it out to me), as they were the ones who conducted the raid. But the IRS being involved does not necessarily mean tax evasion because the IRS criminal investigation unit is also responsible for investigating money laundering and the Bank Secrecy Act, in addition to taxes:
https://www.irs.gov/about-irs/criminal-investigation-ci-at-a-glance

And since taxes were not mentioned in the article, I am in agreement with you that people should not jump to conclusions about tax evasion. The article that @Garden Kitty posted on page 2 of the thread does a great job of walking through what the charges appear to relate to.
 

overedge

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The only way to hide cash sales is to keep the money as cash and spend it over time for one's living expenses (e.g. gas, groceries).
Given the amounts of money involving in selling/buying cars, that would be a lot of cash lying around at any given time. Which could cause its own set of complications.....
 

Japanfan

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The only way to hide cash sales is to keep the money as cash and spend it over time for one's living expenses (e.g. gas, groceries). Depositing the money at a bank leaves a paper trail.
That can work okay for a small, cash-based business. I pay my dog boarder and hairstylist cash, and doubt they report it.

But hiding money could get tricky for a bigger business. If a person with such a business were audited, emails might be found mentioning the cost of a product or service or referring to payments made. Individuals sell used cars for cash, but a used car dealership is a different matter altogether.

As a small business person, my approach is just to declare all my income. However, getting cash payments is not an option for me as I conduct all my business online. If I wanted cash I'd have to drive all over the place to collect from clients, or have them come to me. Some of my Asian clients have preferred cash, but I just don't want the hassle of having to set up a meeting time.
 

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