News and updates à la Française, part trois

Sylvia

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Videos from the French national team tour:

Saint Pierre and Miquelon (ETA: "a French archipelago south of the Canadian island of Newfoundland"): https://vimeo.com/161774625
(video link was posted by Zemgirl in the previous thread: http://www.fsuniverse.net/forum/index.php?threads/news-and-updates-à-la-française.85209/page-34 )

Marseille:
Spring tour dates: https://ffsg.org/tournee-equipe-de-france-2016/
 
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Sylvia

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Communiqué de Presse de la FFSG

Gabriella Papadakis, victime d’un léger malaise après une exhibition à Clermont Ferrand ce dimanche 17 Avril 2016, a dû se résoudre à déclarer forfait pour la compétition du « Team Challenge Cup » opposant l’Europe à l’Asie et à l’Amérique du Nord les 22 au 24 Avril 2016 à Spokane-WA- USA-

Full statement: https://www.facebook.com/sportsdeglace/posts/1342704849079333
From the P/C fan thread:
According to the press release by FFSG she had a slight discomfort after the show in Clermont-Ferrand. ... I understood she felt dizzy.
It sounds like a wise decision to have her withdraw from the Team Challenge Cup - hope she takes good care of herself.

ETA that Google translates "léger malaise" as "mild discomfort".
 
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sus2850

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Thanks for starting a new thread, Sylvia. I wanted to explain the tour start in the oldest French overseas territory a bit, but as you now also stated "in Canada", I guess I am off the hook for being too brief in my last post in the old thread.

And if course: I hope it is nothing serious with Gabriella, I'd love to see them skate at one of the final tour stops.
 

lauravvv

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Gabriella fainted.
That is quite serious if so. It means she could have much longer lasting aftereffects of that concussion. Probably they should not have competed this season at all. I really, truly hope that it won't turn out to be career ending for her, not even talking about something worse. That would very sad indeed for such an incredible ice dance couple who could be legendary with time. But if it's about Gabriella's health against that then the choice is clear, of course. Let's hope that she won't need to make that choice, though, just be even more careful not to overexhaust herself from now on.
 

laviemn

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I'm going to make the logical assumption that she had the advice of medical professionals who specialize in head injuries when she made the decision to compete, or to not compete in the case of Team Challenge. A complete stranger is not in the position to question her decisions about her health and career.

Dubreuil said she had symptoms for 7 years after her concussion. Obviously she managed it and went on with her life.
 

hanca

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That is quite serious if so. It means she could have much longer lasting aftereffects of that concussion. Probably they should not have competed this season at all. I really, truly hope that it won't turn out to be career ending for her, not even talking about something worse. That would very sad indeed for such an incredible ice dance couple who could be legendary with time. But if it's about Gabriella's health against that then the choice is clear, of course. Let's hope that she won't need to make that choice, though, just be even more careful not to overexhaust herself from now on.
You are making assumptions that it is connected. It might be, but it could also have been caused by other factors, for example skipping breakfast and then skating and having a very low level of blood sugar. Or her blood pressure falling from any reason.
 

lauravvv

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You are making assumptions that it is connected. It might be, but it could also have been caused by other factors, for example skipping breakfast and then skating and having a very low level of blood sugar. Or her blood pressure falling from any reason.
Probably you are right, but consequences from the concussion seem most likely. Although perhaps I exaggerated, and for Gabriella it just still takes a smaller load of physical activities such as training or working out in a gym for exhaustion to set in than it usually and normally would, and she just needs an extended rest before starting preparations for next season.
 

Vagabond

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Google translates "léger malaise" as "mild discomfort".
"Malaise" is a perfectly good English word, meaning exactly the same thing as it means in French, namely:

1. a condition of general bodily weakness or discomfort, often marking the onset of a disease.
2. a vague or unfocused feeling of mental uneasiness, lethargy, or discomfort.
Americans of a certain age -- and those of us who are students of American history ;) -- may associate the term "malaise" with Jimmy Carter's so-called "Malaise speech," which described a national malaise without ever actually using the word. But I don't think Gabriella Papadakis has been suffering from that kind of malaise.
 

millyskate

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"Malaise" is a perfectly good English word, meaning exactly the same thing as it means in French, namely:



Americans of a certain age -- and those of us who are students of American history ;) -- may associate the term "malaise" with Jimmy Carter's so-called "Malaise speech," which described a national malaise without ever actually using the word. But I don't think Gabriella Papadakis has been suffering from that kind of malaise.
Actually in French, the expression "avoir un malaise", at least in certain parts of the country, is employed to mean "to faint". That's what I immediately understood it as. The other option is "s'évanouir" , which is a little more serious / dramatic.
 

cocotaffy

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Actually in French, the expression "avoir un malaise", at least in certain parts of the country, is employed to mean "to faint". That's what I immediately understood it as. The other option is "s'évanouir" , which is a little more serious / dramatic.
Yes exactly, that's how I understood it too till someone pointed out it could just be dizziness. But for me malaise means fainting, dizziness would be "avoir des vertiges" and slight discomfort seems a bit off as a translation. Anyway, I'm betting (and hoping that's just it) she's exhausted by this up and down of a season. In which case, with some deserved rest she should be fine. They took all the precautions after her concussion and she went through long sessions of rehabilitation for helping with her cognitive fonctions so I would not be too worried.
 

Vagabond

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Actually in French, the expression "avoir un malaise", at least in certain parts of the country, is employed to mean "to faint". That's what I immediately understood it as. The other option is "s'évanouir" , which is a little more serious / dramatic.
But the press release doesn't use the expression "avoir un malaise." It calls her "[une] victime d’un léger malaise." I don't think you can faint lightly, even in French. :p
 
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cocotaffy

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But the press release doesn't use the expression "avoir un malaise." It calls her "[une] victime d’un léger malaise." I don't think you can faint lightly, even in French. :p
:rofl: Well actually I would say it's when your knees don't carry you anymore and you're kind of fainting but no matter, I wish when they announce things like this there would be a follow up.
 

hanca

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:rofl: Well actually I would say it's when your knees don't carry you anymore and you're kind of fainting but no matter, I wish when they announce things like this there would be a follow up.
I thought fainting is caused by the brain, not by the knees refusing to carry you. When you faint, you don't know what's going on around you. Dropping in your knees is caused by exhaustion, but the brain is still working. so it is not fainting, not even 'kind of' fainting or 'light' fainting.
 
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cholla

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In French media language, "Un léger malaise" could also be the political correct way of saying she had to rush to the bathroom with the runs or an urgent need to throw up :saint: That doesn't lessen the fact she had to be exhausted with such a schedule. Intense and chronique fatigue is a common after effect of concussion, even long after it occured. BTW, she has the honors of ("almost tabloïd" now) magazine Paris Match this week.
 

hanca

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In French media language, "Un léger malaise" could also be the political correct way of saying she had to rush to the bathroom with the runs or an urgent need to throw up :saint: That doesn't lessen the fact she had to be exhausted with such a schedule. Intense and chronique fatigue is a common after effect of concussion, even long after it occured. BTW, she has the honors of ("almost tabloïd" now) magazine Paris Match this week.
Surely, the fact that she ate something that did not fit with her and had runs as a result would not be indication that she had to be exhausted with such a schedule. That's quite leap in reasoning.
 

cholla

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Surely, the fact that she ate something that did not fit with her and had runs as a result would not be indication that she had to be exhausted with such a schedule. That's quite leap in reasoning.
?? I never stated "the fact she ate something...", I used the conditional tense on purpose, saying that French media COULD use the turn of phrase "un léger malaise" as a way to describe something more trivial. But then, yes, it's not totally illogical to consider that she is maybe exhausted with such a schedule, considering she's been touring and doing PR in the meantime non-stop since Boston. And intense chronique fatigue IS a common after effect of concussion, even years after, that, at least, is a fact. So where is the leap in reasoning ? BTW, in the absolute, the more tired you are, the more prone you are to catch bugs. So even if I had stated that she had the runs, which I didn't, it could also be related to the fact she was exhausted and not the other way round. Read again, I wrote nowhere that she was exhausted because she had the runs ;) And my apology to Gaby's bowels for citing them so many times :rofl:, considering I'm not privy to their current or past state !
 

hanca

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?? I never stated "the fact she ate something...", I used the conditional tense on purpose, saying that French media COULD use the turn of phrase "un léger malaise" as a way to describe something more trivial. But then, yes, it's not totally illogical to consider that she is maybe exhausted with such a schedule, considering she's been touring and doing PR in the meantime non-stop since Boston. And intense chronique fatigue IS a common after effect of concussion, even years after, that, at least, is a fact. So where is the leap in reasoning ? BTW, in the absolute, the more tired you are, the more prone you are to catch bugs. So even if I had stated that she had the runs, which I didn't, it could also be related to the fact she was exhausted and not the other way round. Read again, I wrote nowhere that she was exhausted because she had the runs ;) And my apology to Gaby's bowels for citing them so many times :rofl:, considering I'm not privy to their current or past state !
You wrote that the term could be used in the sense that she had to rush to the bathroom with runs. And in the next sentence you said that it doesn't lessen the fact that she has to be exhausted. Well, as far as I know, one can rush to the bathroom from various reasons, and one of them can be a dietary mistake, so I just couldn't see the connection between her having the runs and being exhausted.
 

rjblue

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I thought fainting is caused by the brain, not by the knees refusing to carry you. When you faint, you don't know what's going on around you. Dropping in your knees is caused by exhaustion, but the brain is still working. so it is not fainting, not even 'kind of' fainting or 'light' fainting.
When I have fainted, I've usually gone to my knees first. Legs, eyesight, hearing, consciousness, in that order.
 

cocotaffy

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OK I got it guys. The exact translation would be with the use of the adjective faint and not the verb `to faint'.
Here is the definition (and that's what I was trying to describe with the weak in the knee thing ):
faint (adj) : feeling weak and dizzy as if you are about to become unconscious
So it would translate like this: she felt faint
I never thought skating would help improve my english but here you go ;)
 

IceAlisa

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I was about to ask if it could mean she felt faint. But sounds like it could mean anything.
 

cholla

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I don't understand, Hanca. Why do you insist on reading something I didn't write ?

You wrote that the term could be used in the sense that she had to rush to the bathroom with runs. And in the next sentence you said that it doesn't lessen the fact that she has to be exhausted.
Yes. Because it doesn't ! You can have the runs, giant hives, beriberi disease, an ingrown nail, wear a blue coat, love poodles and hate onions, and it will not lessen the fact you were exhausted prior to this :lol:

Well, as far as I know, one can rush to the bathroom from various reasons, and one of them can be a dietary mistake, so I just couldn't see the connection between her having the runs and being exhausted.
Of course you didn't see it : there is none ! I said she simply COULD have had a minor ailment described as "feeling dizzy", and that it doesn't minimize/diminish/attenuate the fact she had to be exhausted because of the heavy schedule she had. Meaning : she could have had a stomach bug and that could be the reason why she felt dizzy, but it doesn't mean she wasn't also exhausted, which could be another reason to feel faint. For the last time : I never wrote she had the runs because she was exhausted or she was exhausted because she had the runs. But if you absolutely want to read that, OK with me, feel free ! :D As French saying goes, we're not going to spend New Year's Eve on that ;)

@IceAlisa : yes, "tournis" means vertigo. Literally it's feeling like your head is spinning "la tête qui tourne".
 

hanca

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I don't understand, Hanca. Why do you insist on reading something I didn't write ?

Yes. Because it doesn't ! You can have the runs, giant hives, beriberi disease, an ingrown nail, wear a blue coat, love poodles and hate onions, and it will not lessen the fact you were exhausted prior to this :lol:

Of course you didn't see it : there is none ! I said she simply COULD have had a minor ailment described as "feeling dizzy", and that it doesn't minimize/diminish/attenuate the fact she had to be exhausted because of the heavy schedule she had. Meaning : she could have had a stomach bug and that could be the reason why she felt dizzy, but it doesn't mean she wasn't also exhausted, which could be another reason to feel faint. For the last time : I never wrote she had the runs because she was exhausted or she was exhausted because she had the runs. But if you absolutely want to read that, OK with me, feel free ! :D As French saying goes, we're not going to spend New Year's Eve on that ;)

@IceAlisa : yes, "tournis" means vertigo. Literally it's feeling like your head is spinning "la tête qui tourne".
Cholla, I am not insisting on anything. Your post just left me completely confused and because I don't speak French myself, I couldn't translate it for myself. So I wrote what I am confused about. If you made it clear that you are assuming that she must be exhausted after that season, I would understand that, but as it came immediately after the sentence which says that she could have rushed to the toilet with runs, it just didn't make sense.
 

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