As the Page Turns (the Book Thread)

Peaches LaTour

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I've never read Harriet the Spy. Am I too old to enjoy it?
You are never too old to read a good book no matter what the topic.

Just finished "Say Nothing" a devastating book about murder & memorial during the most recent Irish troubles.

"The Huntress" by Kate Quinn was also excellent.

Since it is now summer, I will do more reading. :)
 

genevieve

drinky typo pbp, closet hugger
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Finally finished The Paris Diversion by Chris Pavone (The Ex-Pats, etc)....

It's sort of a sequel to The Ex-Pats, same central characters and many references to the plot of that book and his others (which while about different people, are part of the same world he's created, so some small overlaps) - but if you are like me and read that book years ago, or not at all, don't let it put you off because he does a good job of bringing you back up to speed, and without too much of the leaps in timeframes that some disliked in the past. In fact, the entire book, aside from a few remembrances, takes place over the course of about 10 hours. Well paced action, interesting and well drawn characters, good writing, satisfying ending. I recommend it.
Yay! Just put a hold on it at the library. Hopefully will get it before the end of summer.

I returned a book today that I thought would be a historical thriller but it was just a bunch of noodling that I couldn't slog through. I am now reading The Overstory by Richard Powers, which I feared would be just as boring, but I finally gave it a chance beyond the forward and the writing is pretty good. It's a peak pick and I wasted the first week, so hopefully this week I'll jam through it.
 

sk8pics

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6,138
I recently read Dave Barry's latest book, Lessons from Lucy. Lucy was his elderly dog. Poignant and funny.
 

Erin

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9,240
So apparently I missed a lot in the book thread while I was travelling...

I did a lot of reading in the last month, not sure if I will comment on every single book because then this post will be longer than some of the books I read, but maybe a few that stuck out.

Finally finished The Paris Diversion by Chris Pavone (The Ex-Pats, etc). Is there anything more luxurious than a day off work when you can get up with the sun, sit in your favourite chair with a cup of tea in your favourite mug, and finish a good book?

Anyway, I loved it. It's sort of a sequel to The Ex-Pats, same central characters and many references to the plot of that book and his others (which while about different people, are part of the same world he's created, so some small overlaps) - but if you are like me and read that book years ago, or not at all, don't let it put you off because he does a good job of bringing you back up to speed, and without too much of the leaps in timeframes that some disliked in the past. In fact, the entire book, aside from a few remembrances, takes place over the course of about 10 hours. Well paced action, interesting and well drawn characters, good writing, satisfying ending. I recommend it.
I’ll start with this one since it’s topical. I enjoyed it too, but I did feel like I was missing something not remembering The Expats well enough because
I really didn’t remember much about Bill and Julia McLean and they are so crucial to this plot

So then I reread The Expats afterward, but I actually think that was maybe a worse idea because I realized how I enjoyed The Expats so much more than The Paris Diversion and it also made me so much sadder about the deterioration of Kate and Dexter’s relationship in The Paris Diversion because they seemed to have quite a good one in The Expats
in spite of all of their lying to each other.
So instead of enjoying The Paris Diversion more after rereading The Expats, I enjoyed it less. Oh well. I did enjoy the reread of The Expats, aside from noticing how stupidly Kate behaves for someone of her profession.

Anyway, as for other reading:

Lilac Girls - mentioned by several other people in this thread, set during WWII and tells the story through the eyes of three women, one American, one Polish in a concentration camp and a German doctor working at that same concentration camp. The American and German are real historical figures. Very well done and it was very moving to read as I was touring places that were touched by WWII. That said, as with any WWII novel, it’s not an easy or pleasant read at many times.

Also on the WWII theme, I just finished Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe by Michael Neiberg. This one had interesting bits - most especially on how Stalin (to me) outplayed the US and Britain and some background on Truman (who I knew little about) and gave me a better understanding of why Churchill was defeated in the 1945 election. It did get a bit repetitive on some aspects - basically beat you over the head with the idea that the 3 powers didn’t want to repeat the mistakes of the Treaty of Versailles and also with Truman’s inexperience. It was surprisingly short on what was actually decided at Potsdam. It promised not to be a book on “Churchill said X and then Truman said Y” but I would have liked a little more detail on the actual proceedings. It kept saying they wanted to avoid the mistakes of 1919 but never really said how they ended up accomplishing that.

I also read Kate Morton’s newest book, The Clockmaker’s daughter. Unfortunately, this is probably her weakest book. There were parts I liked, but I found I wanted to spend more time with the main character Elodie and instead she disappears for a long time. I also got confused by the framing device, it took me forever to figure out who the titular character was, and there were some other things that just weren’t done as well as in the past.
And a romance that felt shoehorned in.
Hopefully she goes back to form on her next one.
 

Tesla

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I also read Kate Morton’s newest book, The Clockmaker’s daughter. Unfortunately, this is probably her weakest book. There were parts I liked, but I found I wanted to spend more time with the main character Elodie and instead she disappears for a long time. I also got confused by the framing device, it took me forever to figure out who the titular character was, and there were some other things that just weren’t done as well as in the past.
I started this, then stopped. I looked at the end, so I don’t know if I’ll go back to it. I found it very disappointing, too. I bought it but now wish I had just taken it out of the library.
 

Erin

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9,240
I started this, then stopped. I looked at the end, so I don’t know if I’ll go back to it. I found it very disappointing, too. I bought it but now wish I had just taken it out of the library.
Same here - I was impatient to read it and the library hold list was so long and I have loved all of Morton’s other books so I figured it was worth buying. I guess next time I’ll have to be more patient and preview it at the library first before I decide to buy.

Maybe as a palate cleanser, I’ll reread The Lake House or The Secret Keeper. I have a week off at home before I have to go back to work, so I have time for some random reading.
 

quartz

uncultured pearl clutcher
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13,055
Ooo! What are some of the books you like?
Some of my favorites from the past few years are: anything by Sarah Walters, Diane Setterfield, Alan Bradley’s Flavia de Luce series, Ami McKay, Deanna Raybourn’s Lady Julia Grey series, Neil Gaiman, Geraldine Brooks, and Ken Follet’s Kingsbridge series.
My re-read over and over again, are The Hobbit, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, The Shellseekers, and The People of the Book.
 

Zemgirl

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I also read Kate Morton’s newest book, The Clockmaker’s daughter.
One day authors will run out of professions for all the women's fathers and husbands.

I haven't read anything recently; everything I browse seems either unappealing or overpriced.
 

Japanfan

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I've been in a reading drought as well. One from the library, The Chemist by Stephanie Meyers, has failed to grab me so far but I should give it another few chapters.

And this night while cleaning my office I found 'Keep the Home Fires Burning', which I forgot I had. It's a continuation of the TV series 'Home Fires', about The Women's Institute in Britain and women's lives during WWII. It was an excellent series that was unfortunately cancelled after just two seasons.

Guess my drought is over for a bit. :cheer2:
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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20,915
re The Paris Diversion

I didn't remember Bill and Julia either - maybe if I had I would have recognized their current incarnations a lot sooner - and found the Peter side of things confusing.

Also not a big fan of reading about unhappy marriages, although in this case I did find it interesting along with Susanna/Julia's views on her own relationship, and the way all of them think of their children. One wonders what the author's wife thought of all this, and then his acknowledgements at the end, and I think it could just be that Pavone is a man in his forties in a career that can be really stressful for both the writer and his family, plus being a husband and father, so in the end I read it as more insights/musings/likely a good dose of honesty about himself more than Kate or the others, none of which were particularly likeable.

Loved the Forsythe character though - laughed out loud several times - and found many of the others very well drawn, interesting, etc. Some of the heavier scenes - in the tunnel, on the rooftop and then what finally happens to the sniper, the driver, even the PR person at 4syte, very well done in terms of getting inside their heads.
 

JoannaLouise

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I recently read How to Stop Time, by Matt Haig. It's about a man who ages much more slowly than the average person - so he's over 400 years old, but looks like he's in his 40s. He of course has trouble dealing with the consequences of living such a long life, and then drama ensues when he meets others with his "condition". I mostly really liked it, but thought that the last couple of chapters wrapped everything up a little too quickly.

I also read The Shadow of the Wind, by Carlos Luiz Zafon, for our office book club. A young boy picks out a book from a place called "the cemetery of forgotten books", finds out that all other books by this author have been systematically destroyed, and goes on a quest to find out more about the author. I really enjoyed this one; it had sort of a dark, gothic feel to it.

And I'm currently reading Once Upon a River, by Diane Setterfield. (Did someone here recommend this one? It came up on my "holds" list at the library, and I have no memory of actually putting it on hold...) Anyway, I'm glad I did put it on hold, whatever the reason was, because I'm really enjoying it so far. It's another one that's a bit dark and mysterious, but I guess I kind of like that.
 

Tesla

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And I'm currently reading Once Upon a River, by Diane Setterfield. (Did someone here recommend this one? It came up on my "holds" list at the library, and I have no memory of actually putting it on hold...) Anyway, I'm glad I did put it on hold, whatever the reason was, because I'm really enjoying it so far. It's another one that's a bit dark and mysterious, but I guess I kind of like that.
This one I bought but I haven't read yet. I've sort of been afraid to. :p I loved her The Thirteenth Tale. Didn't read her follow up because it just didn't sound like my cup of tea. I'm glad you're enjoying it. That gives me hope. :)
 

Erin

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Jenny, I agree that the Hunter Forsythe character was great in The Paris Diversion and I also loved the 4syte PR person. Pretty much every scene involving Hunter and 4syte was gold.
I think my favourite was the reveal at the end that his assistant totally hated him and had given information to the McLeans

And I also found the stuff with Peter confusing - all I can think is that it’s setup for the next sequel?
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
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I'm reading The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott and halfway through the book. I enjoy her stories, but this is an especially good one for people who can't get enough about nuns. It's giving those Amish writing novelists a run for their money. :lol:
 

puglover

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I haven't noticed too many nice and easy reads released for beach readers this year. I just picked up the latest Jennifer Weiner - "Mrs. Everything". I hope it holds my interest but isn't too heavy.
 

missing

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I'm reading The Ninth Hour by Alice McDermott and halfway through the book. I enjoy her stories, but this is an especially good one for people who can't get enough about nuns. It's giving those Amish writing novelists a run for their money. :lol:
I can never get enough about nuns and just took it out from the library and got it delivered to my Kindle.

I've been reading Young And Damned And Fair, a very well written biography of Catherine Howard (Henry VIII's fifth), but I keep getting distracted, so having a book with a two week limit on the Kindle may inspire me to read and not do acrostic puzzles.
 

Habs

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You are never too old to read a good book no matter what the topic.

Just finished "Say Nothing" a devastating book about murder & memorial during the most recent Irish troubles.

"The Huntress" by Kate Quinn was also excellent.

Since it is now summer, I will do more reading. :)
I really enjoyed "The Huntress." Even though you know who the Huntress is, it didn't take away from the story at all.

My re-read over and over again, are The Hobbit, A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, The Shellseekers, and The People of the Book.
The Shellseekers is one of my favourite books. It was my grandmother's favourite and when she died, my mom made sure I got her hardcover copy of it. I love that my grandma had a book plate in it, and she wrote the date on it every time she read it.

I haven't noticed too many nice and easy reads released for beach readers this year. I just picked up the latest Jennifer Weiner - "Mrs. Everything". I hope it holds my interest but isn't too heavy.
I picked up "Mrs. Everything" last night (I love libraries, but I also love treating myself to a new book!). I'm planning to start it this weekend - Jennifer Weiner hasn't disappointed me yet.
 

Peaches LaTour

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The Last Stone.

A heartbreaking, true, cold case story featuring the relentless interogation efforts of police when dealing with their prime suspect in a 40 year old crime.

My next book will be something fun. Haven't decided what that will be, yet.
 

Susan1

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I haven't seen any posts here for awhile. Is everybody too busy to read?

You know how I get the library magazine to check out authors I might want to add to my read list. July already came out - "Private Eye July". So, they have some books that say "if you like............, you might like..........." I looked up a Scott Pratt that has a bunch of "earnest young lawyer solves the case" books, like John Grisham, from 2008-2018. And he has books written with Kelly Hodge, so I looked him (I guess it's a him) up , and found this:

http://kellyhodge.squarespace.com/contact/2019/2/9/billy-sets-sail

How sad! And neither of those books are in the library.

And there is a book by Allison Dickson, first thriller, called The Other Mrs. Miller. She is from Dayton, Ohio. The story is set in Chicago, so not in Dayton or the burbs. But I reserved it. I'm the 6th in line cause they don't even have it yet.
 

Jenny

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Has anyone read any Thomas McGuane? The author has been recommended to me, not sure where to start. I prefer novels over short stories, interested to hear if anyone here has read him.
 

A.H.Black

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nlloyd

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Have you also read The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society? Also in epistolary form. In some ways it's a lot of fun but it is about the aftermath of World War II with serious issues as well. I enjoyed it.
I haven't read it, but I have seen the movie. I'll have to look out for it.
 

Susan1

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For the YA fans here - have you read Pam Webber's The Wiregrass or Moon Water? I don't read YA books, but these sound like good period pieces of "coming of age" in the south 1950s and 1969. This author was recommended in the back of a book of an adult mystery author that was recommended in the library magazine. (I gotta stop looking these people up!)

p.s it said "women authors". AARRGGHH. They did it on Jeopardy last night too. "Female" authors!!! "Female" authors!!!! The only real comparison I can come up with is male models. Generally titles don't get distinguished unless it's about a FEMALE. You wouldn't say men models. Maybe "male nurse"? You don't say "man nurse". Anyway.................GIANT pet peeve...............
 

millyskate

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I'm two-thirds through "The Blind Assassin" by Margaret Atwood, and echoing what others have said in this thread before, it's good but the sub story in the sub story is really annoying.
It is such a frustrating trait of contemporary literature that authors feel under pressure to skip between time periods, storylines and dimensions in every single novel... it makes me long for a good old Agatha Christie.
 

Erin

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9,240
I read the latest by Victoria Helen Stone (the author of Jane Doe), False Step. The story for this one was reasonably interesting, but the protagonist was so irritating. She was really weak and sometimes stupid, which was disappointing after Jane was such a strong and smart character in Jane Doe. I do see that Stone has a future book coming out in March that features Jane again, though, so I will look forward to that.

I also finally got through the hold list for Daisy Jones and the Six. I enjoyed it although maybe felt like it had been overhyped a bit. Karen was definitely my favorite character. I related a lot to the feeling of not wanting to be tied down.
 

Zemgirl

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I read the latest by Victoria Helen Stone (the author of Jane Doe), False Step. The story for this one was reasonably interesting, but the protagonist was so irritating. She was really weak and sometimes stupid, which was disappointing after Jane was such a strong and smart character in Jane Doe. I do see that Stone has a future book coming out in March that features Jane again, though, so I will look forward to that.
Have you read any of her romance novels? She published those as Victoria Dahl (which may be her real name, I'm not sure).
 

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