HBO - The Weight of Gold

Yazmeen

Shake it then, shake it now, shake it forever
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New documentary on HBO, narrated by Michael Phelps about mental health issues in former Olympians once the games are over. Both Sasha Cohen and Gracie Gold are featured, and Gracie is especially blunt. Please note that the documentary contains footage that is older (the late bobsledder, Steve Holcomb, is in it, and he died in 2017). It's a very good documentary, and it really shows the mental challenges so many elite athletes face. As an example, I used to just roll my eyes whenever I saw an article about Lolo Jones - this movie really helped me understand the mental trauma she has suffered and empathize with her.

 

Sylvia

Looking forward to U.S. club competition season
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LarrySK8

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I have watched and re-watched the documentary. It is quiet good. Sasha Cohen, in particular, was very effective in expressing many issues and her own issues in a very clear, objective way. Gracie Gold expressed her anger and disappointment in the USFS system, as well as expressing her disillusionment with the system of amateur skaters. Apollo Ono and Shaun White clearly expressed the "revolving door" aspect of Olympic Champions - champions ultimately being shown the door.

I related strongly to the subjects in the documentary and became engaged and involved after the first few minutes. Having skated for 17 years and retiring, I felt I could relate. After practicing medicine for over 30 years and now preparing for retirement next year, I felt I could relate. In medicine, there is no outlet and it is career suicide to acknowledge, be diagnosed with or deal with any mental health issues. Victim blaming terms like "burnout," are applied to those who suffer Human Rights violations every day while practicing. Once you retire, you are forgotten in a month and no one cares, or has ever cared, about your mental well being - you are replaced. Adios.

When retirement is planned and executed, it can be terrific. When unplanned or forced, it can be awful. Truth is, outside of the individual and their connections, no one in the system really cares.
 

just tuned in

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I have watched and re-watched the documentary. It is quiet good. Sasha Cohen, in particular, was very effective in expressing many issues and her own issues in a very clear, objective way. Gracie Gold expressed her anger and disappointment in the USFS system, as well as expressing her disillusionment with the system of amateur skaters. Apollo Ono and Shaun White clearly expressed the "revolving door" aspect of Olympic Champions - champions ultimately being shown the door.

I related strongly to the subjects in the documentary and became engaged and involved after the first few minutes. Having skated for 17 years and retiring, I felt I could relate. After practicing medicine for over 30 years and now preparing for retirement next year, I felt I could relate. In medicine, there is no outlet and it is career suicide to acknowledge, be diagnosed with or deal with any mental health issues. Victim blaming terms like "burnout," are applied to those who suffer Human Rights violations every day while practicing. Once you retire, you are forgotten in a month and no one cares, or has ever cared, about your mental well being - you are replaced. Adios.

When retirement is planned and executed, it can be terrific. When unplanned or forced, it can be awful. Truth is, outside of the individual and their connections, no one in the system really cares.
Thank you for sharing. Among the most poignant moments in the documentary was when Phelps said that no one on his team (he was talking about coaches and trainers) cared about his mental health... Wow, what a statement against Bowman, who had raised him from a pup.
 
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