When and how should we open schools?

once_upon

Voter
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16,759
I did not know this:
I had heard some of this - particularly about the storage issue, requiring specialized refrigeration.

I dont know how they could get it to high risk elderly in nursing homes because of the refrigeration requirements.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
I'm saying I didn't know CA was already working on a distribution plan. We've discussed the storage issues here before.

What I want to know is: what are other states doing? And is it going to be like PPE where it's every state for itself? Hope not but it probably will be.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,371
I'm saying I didn't know CA was already working on a distribution plan. We've discussed the storage issues here before.

What I want to know is: what are other states doing? And is it going to be like PPE where it's every state for itself? Hope not but it probably will be.
I've not been reading the articles on the preparation plans for different states, but the president told them all to put together plans for November so there have been articles popping up in a bunch of states about this. The fact that states were told to do this does sound to me just like the rest of the president's pass-the-responsibility-buck-onto-the-governors system of handling the *********. Here are a few articles:

States face Friday deadline from CDC to submit plans to distribute ******** vaccine​


Facing Many Unknowns, States Rush To Plan Distribution Of *********-19 Vaccines​


Nevada & Missouri are two states that I believe have turned in their plans. I didn't really turn up anything in the way of details when searching the articles about each of these, but you might try.

I haven't seen anything about it for Oregon yet except a quote from one article saying that Oregon, Delaware, and at least one other state were waiting for more federal guidance before investing in freezing equipment. (That was a while ago so perhaps the CDC responded with more details). There are a couple articles for Washington State--one from yesterday has a quote saying they are diligently working on the plan & should have it ready to submit on the 16th, which was the day before the article was published. But I don't see anything about the plan or confirming that it was submitted.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,718
New York City schools are doing pretty okay.

For months, as New York City struggled to start part-time, in-person classes, fear grew that its 1,800 public schools would become vectors of ******** infection, a citywide archipelago of super-spreader sites.

But nearly three weeks into the in-person school year, early data from the city’s first effort at targeted testing has shown the opposite: a surprisingly small number of positive cases.

Out of 16,348 staff members and students tested randomly by the school system in the first week of its testing regimen, the city has gotten back results for 16,298. There were only 28 positives: 20 staff members and eight students.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
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The New York Times offered some very good news.

Since it came in an email, I think it's all right to reproduce it in its entirety:

Schools appear safer than thought​

A few months into the semester, a pattern is emerging: K-12 schools do not seem to be stoking community transmission of the ********. Elementary schools, especially, seem to seed remarkably few infections.

Although children can infect one another, the data, gathered from random testing in the United States and Britain, suggests only limited transmission from young children to adults. One study published in the journal Pediatrics surveyed more than 57,000 child care providers across the nation and found that they were no more likely to become infected with the ***** than other adults in the community.​
“A couple of months ago, we really couldn’t be sure that elementary schools could reopen safely, even though the data was hinting at that,” our colleague Apoorva Mandavilli said. “Now, we have real-world data that seems to suggest that’s really the case.”​
Although young children can become infected with the *****, the data suggests that they have a remarkably low risk of severe symptoms. Middle and high school students, though, might be more contagious — and at higher risk for illness. Still, studies show schools may be able to contain the ***** if prevalence in the community is low and administrators take proper precautions.​
“It’s clear that kids are not superspreaders,” Apoorva said. “Even if they are contributing to community spread, which maybe they are, a little bit, it’s not going to be more than what’s coming from restaurants or gyms or any other adult activities.”​
“This is a message to communities: If they prioritize schools, they can have their kids go back,” she said.​
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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23,026
Right now it seems like spread is not happening in schools in Connecticut. We have cases and most of the school districts in the state if not all, but none of the cases are related. When there are cases they test and quarantine, but they aren’t finding any cases that are related. It seems like what is happening is that, especially with the hybrid model that is allowing a lot of distance in the classroom, people are following the rules very well at school and so there is no transmission. Then in their private lives they don’t follow the rules, so that’s where transmission happens.

I don’t know about a full return because, with the hybrid model, we are able to get a lot of space. 13 kids in a room is very different than 19.

That being said, even a “full return” wouldn’t be a full return because we have a lot of students who have elected full distance learning and they wouldn’t come back with a switch to full time school.

I have heard that some schools are considering full distance between thanksgiving and winter break because of the high probability of high risk behavior outside of school.
 

PrincessLeppard

Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple
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27,089
I have heard that some schools are considering full distance between thanksgiving and winter break because of the high probability of high risk behavior outside of school.
My school is making some noises about this, but being vague. We've been told to have finals ready to go before Thanksgiving, as that might be the last day of school. :yikes:

We were doing fine until recently. The dial went to mid-orange, and then half the town where I teach went to the Trump Rally where people got hypothermia. You'd think they might wear masks in the cold. You are thinking incorrectly.
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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23,026
My school is making some noises about this, but being vague. We've been told to have finals ready to go before Thanksgiving, as that might be the last day of school. :yikes:

We were doing fine until recently. The dial went to mid-orange, and then half the town where I teach went to the Trump Rally where people got hypothermia. You'd think they might wear masks in the cold. You are thinking incorrectly.

that's bananas. If we take a break, it’ll just be a switch to distance learning.

there are still people rabble rousing for a switch to full time, but the numbers are going up from where they were when hybrid was picked in the first place, so how do you justify that?
 

PrincessLeppard

Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple
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27,089
We are currently in person full-time, and it had been going well. So I guess instead of switching to hybrid or remote, we're just going to...not have school?

I dunno.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
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3,718
This is a survey article about what different school districts are doing throughout U.S. cities.

The majority of the 15 largest districts in the nation now have at least some students in school buildings. Only two of those districts had any form of in-person learning as of early September.

Large schools had faced bigger hurdles than smaller ones as they waited out case spikes in major cities and concerns grew about possible outbreaks in school buildings. Now, as several major districts have decided to try to meet in person, rising *********-19 cases again threaten their efforts.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
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3,718
A number of Texas universities are trying to figure out ways of holding autumn graduations.

I'd feel more confident about their abilities to do so if they had been able to teach their students basic rules of grammar.

Texas Tech University senior Klay Davis worried for months that his 81-year-old grandmother wouldn’t get the chance to watch him walk across the graduation stage this December to receive his bachelor’s degree in animal science.

Graduations across the state were mostly shifted online or postponed this spring and summer due to the *********-19 *********, but Davis said a virtual event wasn’t going to cut it for his family.

“My grandma told my brother and I that her goal before she passes is to see [us] graduate college,” said Davis, who is graduating a semester early. He wanted that moment to celebrate, too. “I worked hard for a four-year degree. I think having such a memorable day, walking across that stage, is necessary.”
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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23,026
Graduations across the state were mostly shifted online or postponed this spring and summer due to the *********-19 *********, but Davis said a virtual event wasn’t going to cut it for his family.

Because all the people who missed out on it in the spring didn't have family who wanted to see them graduate and it wasn't an important moment for them. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

My alma mater (Syracuse) is going fully virtual after today.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
Because all the people who missed out on it in the spring didn't have family who wanted to see them graduate and it wasn't an important moment for them. :rolleyes::rolleyes::rolleyes:

My alma mater (Syracuse) is going fully virtual after today.
The entitlement was a bit much.

Actual graduations are pretty boring. If they end up having a graduation watching party for the actual event, that might even be more fun.
 

GarrAargHrumph

I can kill you with my brain
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19,106
My daughter's school is shutting down in person and going all virtual for a week. They had three kids test positive, but that's not the issue - the issue is that those three kids caused 32 teachers and other staff to have to quarantine, so there you go.

As a related aside, the mayor of NYC said that they're almost to the point where NYC schools will move to 100% virtual. That happens when 3% of the population of NYC tests positive. They were at 2.6% today.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
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8,371
A lot of articles about schools yesterday when I was skimming headlines from different states. Here is an update from a variety of states. (I posted some of these in the news & experiences thread yesterday):


Oklahoma City Schools are all returning to distance learning, as well as a number of other schools around the state of Oklahoma:

Area schools move to virtual learning after skyrocketing *********-19 cases reported across the state​

***** surge: Schools abandon classes, states retreat​

"School systems in Detroit, Indianapolis, Philadelphia and suburban Minneapolis are giving up on in-person classes"

More W MI schools pushed into virtual learning amid ******** surge​


The governor of West Virginia is closing schools for the week after Thanksgiving.

K-12 schools in Alabama had over 1,500 cases this week (up 500 from last week).
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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23,026
Around here I think that a lot of schools are going to go full distance after Thanksgiving for at least two weeks because of concerns over students traveling out of state and not quarantining and/or the possibility that enough teachers will travel out of state and half to quarantine that they won't be able to staff the school.

Subs have been functionally impossible to get this year (for obvious reasons). We have been able to stay open, but the amount that we have had to cover for each other is yet another stress on our staff, and it once again makes it harder for teachers to stay home when sick. The middle school has so many staff quarantined that they have had to close for the last three days due to insufficient available staff to open.
 

Dobre

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8,371
Yeah. Schools in one of the counties here just reopened @3 weeks ago with case numbers finally going down in the county after the summer surge. I don't think they will want to close between Thanksgiving & Christmas because of how late they opened, but I have a feeling they may not have a choice.
 

GarrAargHrumph

I can kill you with my brain
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19,106
My university had always planned to go remote after Thanksgiving, and they've since decided that although classes will restart as planned on January 19th, they'll all restart remotely, with in person classes only moving to in person as of Feb 1. So we aren't extending the break, but we are extending the amount of time the students stay away from campus. We also eliminated spring break, to make it so students don't travel.

This doesn't impact me, as I'd already decided all my classes next term will be asynchronous online.
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
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50,812
My university had always planned to go remote after Thanksgiving, and they've since decided that although classes will restart as planned on January 19th, they'll all restart remotely, with in person classes only moving to in person as of Feb 1. So we aren't extending the break, but we are extending the amount of time the students stay away from campus. We also eliminated spring break, to make it so students don't travel.

This doesn't impact me, as I'd already decided all my classes next term will be asynchronous online.
We have added more in-person classes for Spring semester--and free in-house ********* testing.

I have an older student who decided to go back to school after her youngest child left home. She has several chronic health problems and told me during the first week of class that she was so grateful for online classes because she is high risk.

Since that first week, this student has:
  • attended a big wedding in Florida
  • attended a family reunion in Indiana
  • attended a 95th birthday party that was essentially a family reunion in South Dakota
  • attended a Trump rally somewhere

And that's just the things I know about because she's had technology issues while on those trips and/or posted about them on a discussion forum.

She's been tested for ********* twice that I know of, both times because she had symptoms. I do not know the outcomes of the tests.

But when I was asked if I would teach F2F next term, she was the first student I thought of when I said no. From what I have seen on campus (which isn't much, as nearly everything is remote), the kids wear their masks but don't social distance. The older people wear their masks under their noses or around their necks and don't social distance, either.
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
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50,812
@Prancer I really hope that student is taking all their classes online, not just yours. Talk about self-destructive behaviour....
She is. Because she's high risk and is afraid to be on campus.

Yeah, I don't get it, either.

Sometimes the young students tell me things that make my hair kind of stand on end, too. But this particular student really sealed the deal for me for spring teaching.
 

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