When and how should we open schools?

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
That might all be true, but nationally, Louis is right. Wealthy, predominantly white schools are more likely to be open while schools in poor, predominantly non-white districts are closed.
How many of those open schools are private, btw? Around here, private schools were the first to apply for variances to be able to open.
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
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50,812
How many of those open schools are private, btw? Around here, private schools were the first to apply for variances to be able to open.

The Vox article I posted earlier was about a survey of public school districts.

Just 24 percent of districts with the lowest rate of poverty in the CRPE survey planned to start remotely, compared with 41 percent of the highest-poverty districts.
 

SkateSand

Cat Servant
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827
All of our local colleges have now gone online - even the religious, private ones. Seems returning college students were driving up our county case numbers and now we have to take a step back in our county opening stages. It's supposed to happen in the next week or so.
 

Louis

Private citizen
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15,171
I feel sorry for the businesses in these ZIP codes, which will also be closed. This seems very unfair to me. While parents can't send their children to a different school, they can just walk/drive/subway/bus over to the next ZIP code to shop - probably bringing the v*rus with them. This will kill businesses :(.
 

GarrAargHrumph

I can kill you with my brain
Messages
19,106
New York is responding to growing clusters of ******** cases in 20 “hotspot” ZIP codes that are reporting positivity rates, or the number of tests coming back positive, as high as 18%, based on a weekly average, according to a statement from Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s office on Saturday.

More than half of the hotspot ZIP codes are from Kings and Queens counties, which are located in New York City’s Brooklyn and Queens boroughs. Two other counties slightly north of New York City — Rockland and Orange — make up the remaining hotspot areas.

Although the top 20 ZIP codes are home to 6.7% of the state’s population, they represented 26% of Friday’s new *********-19 cases, Cuomo said. The average positivity rate among them is 5.2% — well above the 1% rate for the remainder of the state."

This is why I'd earlier said that We're #1. ;) I live in one of these zip codes in NY State. The issue is with the Hassidic part of the town (The Village of Palm Tree is a Hassidic community), not the other parts of the zip code. The governor was waiting until yesterday/today to see the numbers via census tract rather than zip code, because it was felt that zip codes, upstate, are too broad. The county dept of health has just now ordered a shut down of the schools in KJ/Palm Tree, where the positivity rate is currently 28%. They have to bring their positivity rate below 9%, and also be shut down for two weeks, before they can reopen. This includes schools elsewhere in the county where most students are from KJ.

My understanding was that teachers' unions were promised schools would return to all virtual if the positivity rate went over 3%?

The 3% threshold is for NYC schools, not for others in NY State.
 

GarrAargHrumph

I can kill you with my brain
Messages
19,106
I feel sorry for the businesses in these ZIP codes, which will also be closed. This seems very unfair to me. While parents can't send their children to a different school, they can just walk/drive/subway/bus over to the next ZIP code to shop - probably bringing the v*rus with them. This will kill businesses :(.

The governor and the mayor were arguing about this. The mayor, I understand, wanted to close the businesses in the NYC zip codes where ********* is high. The governor wanted to keep them open. Did they close the businesses as well as the schools, in the end?
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
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15,375
It's only indirectly related to schools but Maryland requires its child care teachers to get regular medical exams. They are performed by medical centers that are ERs. A few of my mom's colleagues went today and turned back around. There's a 2-4 hour wait time.

How about Maryland waive the exam for anyone who is due at the moment so that the teachers are not unnecessarily exposed to a severe health risk and to take strain off the ER?! I'm sure they've got better things to do right now than a superficial check-up of healthy persons.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
This is an interesting article about how enrollment in public schools has gone down all over the US:


Note: unless they fudged the numbers, this didn't happen in my school district. They expected it but it didn't happen.
 

PrincessLeppard

Holding Alex Johnson's Pineapple
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27,089
I'm not surprised kindergarten numbers are down. I'd probably hold my kid back, too, if I had one.

I'm also curious what will happen in the spring semester. My remote learners (I have 34) are crashing and burning. I expect about five of them to pass. (To be fair to some of them, seven online classes is a LOT of online learning.)

I'm trying with some that I think can make it with some encouragement. Thank goodness for the Zoom "share screen" feature. I've had them put the tests up and we talk through the questions. One thing that I think might be helpful (and I should shoot an email to Edgenuity about this) would be a tool where the kids can cross out the answers they've eliminated.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
Another article on online vs. in-person schooling:


It says that it's going better than in the Spring. I'm sure that's true but that doesn't mean it's adequate. They mentioned K-2 especially and those grades are cleared to go back to school in my county but the school board just isn't interested.

It will be interesting to see what happens after the election when the make-up of the school board changes.
 

clairecloutier

Well-Known Member
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10,944
We’ve finished 2 weeks of in-person hybrid (4 mornings a week) at my daughters’ school. So far, there was one possible crud case, which fortunately turned out to be negative. My kids are enjoying being in-person, despite having to wear masks and having little opportunity for socializing. They like their new teachers and even the subjects they’re studying. So far, so good.

But we’re on a week-to-week basis. The state releases new CV19 figures each week for each town, and if our rate goes up too much, the school will shut down the hybrid in-person model.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
6,849
We have been back to 100% in school classes for 4+ weeks now. Masks, social distancing... no cases at my school. Mandatory testing for any child with symptoms (or a 14 day quarantine).

Same with us.

Week 6 starts tomorrow.

No cases in any schools in the province yet but New Brunswick has 3 schools shut due to cases.
 

million$momma

Well-Known Member
Messages
447
Same with us.

Week 6 starts tomorrow.

No cases in any schools in the province yet but New Brunswick has 3 schools shut due to cases.
We have cases in our district. There is 1 case each at 2 different high schools and 2 different elementary schools. No school closures so far!
 

sk8nlizard

Well-Known Member
Messages
512
Same with us.

Week 6 starts tomorrow.

No cases in any schools in the province yet but New Brunswick has 3 schools shut due to cases.

I live in Texas which is a hot spot, though not as bad as it was (however our cases are rising again). School in our district has been back since August 26, F2F full time 5 days a week, masks required, social distancing when able though about 70% of the district is back right now and starting the new quarter next week it will be more like 82%. My kid’s school hasn’t had one case yet. Most of the elementary schools have had 0 or 1 case. Most of the cases are in high school, where sports are happening. If school numbers stay this low then my kid’s will go back in January even though I am high risk. They aren’t getting the same education as kids that are going in person. It’s one thing when everyone in the state or district is remote, it’s a whole different thing when some are remote and the vast majority are in person. Especially when the school district doesn’t really support the remote learning.
Some districts in Texas have gotten rid of remote learning, your choices are homeschool, send your kid to a private school, put them in a different district or send them back in person. Most of these are smaller rural districts, though one mid size district (18K students) just announced this as well.
 

jeffisjeff

Well-Known Member
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16,185
I live in Texas which is a hot spot, though not as bad as it was (however our cases are rising again). School in our district has been back since August 26, F2F full time 5 days a week, masks required, social distancing when able though about 70% of the district is back right now and starting the new quarter next week it will be more like 82%. My kid’s school hasn’t had one case yet. Most of the elementary schools have had 0 or 1 case. Most of the cases are in high school, where sports are happening.

Things in my district are very similar. I posted that a couple of weeks ago, and even though cases in the region have increased substantially since then, the schools are still doing well. The cases that are cropping up at the schools are coming from the outside; there hasn't been spread within the schools, except for sports teams at the start of the year.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
The Atlantic says schools aren't super-spreaders:



CNN says no one really knows what is going on:

 

CassAgain

Well-Known Member
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2,037
Our whole football team and their coach (who is also a fantastic 8th grade science teacher) is quarantined. We are still in-person, though, and expect more to come back next week. Arkansas had our highest ever new cases reported on Wednesday :yikes:

The students are doing better with masks :shuffle:
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
The School Board agreed to allow teams to resume "conditioning" in person this week. (So practices without games.)

I was somewhat shocked they did that as they have been super, even overly, cautious. I still think no matter what they'll keep school online until at least the end of the semester.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
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8,372
The county where I grew up decided to cancel fair back in September, but some *(&^! group went ahead & held the high school rodeo this past week instead :wall:.

Theoretically, rodeo should be a sport one can do safely. In reality, I know of two ********* cases attached to people who frequent the rodeo circuit & since I learned about their cases via another person who frequents it, the rodeo crowd is not who I would trust to hold a safe event.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
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8,372
As schools reopen, children’s ******** case numbers double in two months

"******** case numbers for Idaho school-aged children have doubled in two months — exceeding even the state’s rapid increase in cases. These numbers correlate with the start of the 2020-21 school year, and attempts to reopen K-12 schools to face-to-face instruction.

On Tuesday, the state reported 4,270 ******** cases involving 5- to 17-year-old children. No Idaho children have died from *********-19, which has killed more than 500 Idahoans. Consistent with national and international trends, the majority of Idaho’s *********-19 deaths have involved patients in their 80s or older.

Nonetheless, ******** outbreaks in K-12 schools remain a public health concern — threatening community spread of the contagious *****, and putting teachers and school staff at risk of contracting *********-19 from students. Weeks into the new academic year, outbreaks have forced numerous schools to scale back face-to-face schedules, shifting to online instruction or a blend of virtual and classroom learning. Last week, the White House’s ******** task force said outbreaks in 10 Idaho counties could be tied to school reopenings, and the task force suggested shifting to online instruction."
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
Messages
23,026
I teach high school, which I think many people know. We are doing hybrid with synchronous teaching (meaning those at home learn attend the same class as those in person and learn at the same time).

It’s very interesting because a lot of conversation has been about how much kids hate distance learning, but my kids are constantly switching to distance learning and I am not in an area with high rates. One of my classes has 20 kids, and we’re at the point where only about 6-7 attend in person each week over the two hybrid days. On the other hand, my AP class is 22 students and only 2 are distance.

Many of my put together students who have chosen distance are doing fine, but many of my students have turned in basically nothing, so I don’t think all of them are making good choices.
 

vesperholly

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,783
This is an interesting article about how enrollment in public schools has gone down all over the US:


Note: unless they fudged the numbers, this didn't happen in my school district. They expected it but it didn't happen.

I wonder how many have switched to private schools so their kids can go back full time. I skate with a few girls who attend different private schools (both religious and not) and they are 100% in person.
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
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50,812
Many of my put together students who have chosen distance are doing fine, but many of my students have turned in basically nothing, so I don’t think all of them are making good choices.
Yes, one of the things we have learned after years of distance learning is that you have to have a good support system in place, especially for the ones who are new to distance learning. We have a whole system of alerts and followups for students who disappear from online classes. All I have to do is report a concern and there are other people who follow up.

Not that this always succeeds. Or even mostly, really. But some of them do start showing up again.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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37,879
I suspect that by the time they disappear, it's too late. (Based on personal experience and experience with my kids.)
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
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50,812
I suspect that by the time they disappear, it's too late. (Based on personal experience and experience with my kids.)
Yes, we are supposed to report very quickly. I do a sweep every time I grade a paper (just sent in six reports earlier today). Some faculty do one every other week. If you let them go too long, it's too hard to catch up.

You'd be surprised at how many students are surprised that anyone notices. If a student disappears after midterm, I write to them in addition to the report and ask if they are okay; nothing about work, just a "Hey, are you all right? You haven't been around in a while" kind of thing. Most of them will write back and thank me for reaching out. Those students usually finish. It's the ones who disappear right away who never come back.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,372

‘Out of Control’: When Schools Opened in a ***** Hot Spot​


"On a Friday in mid-September, Sunny Washington got a text from another mother at her daughter’s high school in an affluent suburb of Salt Lake City. Three weeks into the school year, the number of ******** cases at the school was rising, and the district was considering shifting to online instruction. The text urged parents to beg the school board to keep classrooms open.

Ms. Washington ignored the text — she thought the school should be taking advice from public health experts, not parents. But other parents flooded the board with messages, and the school stayed open. Within a week, the number of cases had nearly quadrupled. A teacher was hospitalized and put on a ventilator. When the board finally closed the school temporarily, 77 students and staff members, including Ms. Washington’s daughter, had tested positive.

'We’re talking 30 days in, and it went completely out of control,' Ms. Washington said.

Her daughter’s school, Corner Canyon High School, experienced one of the biggest ******** outbreaks at a school in Utah, and possibly the country, with 90 cases within two weeks — most likely an undercount, since not all students and staff who were exposed or symptomatic got tested."
 

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