What is happening at work?

DreamSkates

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2,452
My first day back at the office was pretty crazy. We came in with 72 applications for SNAP assistance in the queue, and no matter how many we registered more dropped in to replace them. For the first 4 hours of the day we stayed at 72 apps in the work queue. 95% were from people who have either been laid off or flat out terminated due to the *********.

Luckily after lunch we caught a break, I guess, and got the applications down to "just 42." :scream:
Keep up the great work - so many have needs now!
 

Marge_Simpson

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6,329
Ok our lab just got an explanation for all the testing being ordered on the suspect cases: the Board of Health (or possibly some other agency?) wants all the tests done so they can collect data. Which makes sense. But does not decrease our workload.
 

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
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22,680
I am not sure if this in the resources threads, however if you are working from home, this is an excellent guide to setting up your workstation.


And this little clip shows about setting up a home workstation with a laptop

 

MacMadame

My G.O.A.T is better than your G.O.A.T.
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I didn't have a WFH one because I only had 2 links. But now I have 4! :D New thread coming up.
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
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61,905
:lol: Our materials management director has been assuring everybody she had plenty of PPE on hand. Apparently, based on last year's usage. In two weeks the two hospitals used 3 x the number of masks they used in the entire last year. Now, staff are issue one mask a day. I'm sure she's good at her job, but this is not a normal situation. How could she keep thinking it was going to be? Except, now administration knows it's not.
 

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
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22,680
I didn't have a WFH one because I only had 2 links. But now I have 4! :D New thread coming up.
Thanks for that. If I find anything else I will post the links here. We were discussing this at work yesterday so I found some information for them.

One thing you could add which is a general comment,

Some countries may allow you to claim tools and utilities used for working at home. In Australia you can claim use of phone and electricity (you claim cents per hourly rate). Also anything purchased to set up a home office can be claimed such as monitors, desks, equipment, etc. Check with your accountant what you can or cannot claim.
 

peibeck

Simply looking
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26,002
@peibeck If work can’t loan you one, can you call your town resource number? Ours is 211. They should have info on where to get a 2nd monitor. Our city is matching people with free ones as well as loaners.
I work for the state not the city. We have a few extra monitors in our storage closet, but I seriously doubt my supervisor would check them out to me and my coworker if they haven't to the other 25-30 people in our office who are already working from home. But I guess I could always ask. All they can say is "no."

I'm not even in a highly affected health area (at least right now). But it sounds like Springfield (our capital) is pushing for all state offices to go to WFH or skeleton crew.

Understandably we can't even eat our lunches in the break room anymore. It's kind of weird where, instead of our pretty friendly atmosphere, we now all just pass by each other like ships in the night.
 

myhoneyhoney

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2,514
My corporate made it official, we are not to service any accounts and we will get paid 2 weeks. That's it, 2 weeks. I know it's better than no pay and/or getting laid off so I'm greatful. Once we're cleared to return all the accounts will be a huge mess. There will be plenty of work to catch up on = making up all the $$$ we missed out on.
 

Tony Wheeler

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,688
Gyms all throughout Florida are required to stay closed until May 8 as of now. I fully expect an announcement in the next few days saying bars/night clubs/restaurants for dine-in are going to follow this, obviously with the option to modify in the future.

This means the potential of nearly two months without work for the majority of Miami Beach, since 90%+ of the jobs here are restaurants, bars, hotels, gyms, retail-stuff. I have no idea how long the hotels are going to stay shut down but if everything else is closed, I don't see the point in opening anything back up for tourists who can't do anything or go anywhere anyways.

I personally know a few people around here who have tested positive. One of them just today wrote that his ONLY symptoms when going to the hospital were the inability to smell or taste anything. No fever, no shortness of breath, no dry cough. None of it.
 

MacMadame

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I hope those people get their $1200. And good unemployment. (I'm still annoyed our household is getting something. I'm getting paid so why is the government giving me money? It's so stupid.)
 

Japanfan

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22,708
Gyms all throughout Florida are required to stay closed until May 8 as of now. I fully expect an announcement in the next few days saying bars/night clubs/restaurants for dine-in are going to follow this, obviously with the option to modify in the future.
:eek:

No wonder Florida is a hot spot. We were told to shelter in place in Canada two weeks I ago I think? Sorry, if I'm wrong, I don't really remember the timeline. And I think everything shut down last week? Or has it been longer?

This means the potential of nearly two months without work for the majority of Miami Beach, since 90%+ of the jobs here are restaurants, bars, hotels, gyms, retail-stuff.
Better to be out of work than get sick and possibly die, or infect others, who might possibly die. Though I'm sure it's going to be pretty rough on retail and restaurant/hotel service workers, many of whom live paycheque to paycheque.

Our government is at least going to offer some relief to Canadians who lost income, about $2000. a month. Though I'm sure there will be some caveats and it may take a while for the money to be distributed. But it's something.

The US is of course different, as the orange idiot is going to will the country back to business by or on Easter. :( :angryfire
 

Louis

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13,784
What's happening at work? Not much given that 3.3 million people out of work in the US as of this week's jobless numbers and 1.3 billion people in India told to stay at home.

India may finally force the needed conversations about the mass poverty and devastation that the shutdowns will cause. The poverty will be more irreversible than the virus if it doesn't stop soon. Maybe mass shutdowns are still the right choice, but let's have the conversations, understand the full impact, and decide knowing that they are condemning a portion of the world's population to misery that could last a lifetime. I don't want grannies to die, but we have to reframe the conversation and choices. I'd rather be an 80-year-old denied a spot in a Milan hospital than an unemployed laborer in New Delhi. No one is going to die of starvation in the US, but India is an entirely different story.
 

millyskate

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Messages
13,599
I hope those people get their $1200. And good unemployment. (I'm still annoyed our household is getting something. I'm getting paid so why is the government giving me money? It's so stupid.)
Yeah - it's complicated. The British government is so at pains to try and figure out who shouldn't receive money that those who need it are waiting and very upset. I'm not sure what the right way forward is. Maybe a general help but that people would have to claim, and refund in time if they claim unnecessarily based on this years' tax return.
 

snoopy

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,914
What's happening at work? Not much given that 3.3 million people out of work in the US as of this week's jobless numbers and 1.3 billion people in India told to stay at home.

India may finally force the needed conversations about the mass poverty and devastation that the shutdowns will cause. The poverty will be more irreversible than the virus if it doesn't stop soon. Maybe mass shutdowns are still the right choice, but let's have the conversations, understand the full impact, and decide knowing that they are condemning a portion of the world's population to misery that could last a lifetime. I don't want grannies to die, but we have to reframe the conversation and choices. I'd rather be an 80-year-old denied a spot in a Milan hospital than an unemployed laborer in New Delhi. No one is going to die of starvation in the US, but India is an entirely different story.
I can't speak to India but in light of the $2T stimulus, I think we do need to evaluate where this is all taking us. It might not be a good place in terms of income and structural equality.
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
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61,905
What's happening at work? Not much given that 3.3 million people out of work in the US as of this week's jobless numbers and 1.3 billion people in India told to stay at home.

India may finally force the needed conversations about the mass poverty and devastation that the shutdowns will cause. The poverty will be more irreversible than the virus if it doesn't stop soon. Maybe mass shutdowns are still the right choice, but let's have the conversations, understand the full impact, and decide knowing that they are condemning a portion of the world's population to misery that could last a lifetime. I don't want grannies to die, but we have to reframe the conversation and choices. I'd rather be an 80-year-old denied a spot in a Milan hospital than an unemployed laborer in New Delhi. No one is going to die of starvation in the US, but India is an entirely different story.
It's not just the grannies. That's a misnomer. If this sweeps through India's population, a lot of people will die and not from starvation. So, what do they do? Tell everybody to go back to work and get sick? And, those who might live if they got medical treatment don't because the system is unable to handle the crush? Those with mild cases pass it though the entire population? Tell everybody to not go to work and starve? @Louis, I'd suggest you fly to NY and spend a day in one of the hospitals, or go back to Italy and see what's happening there. It's easy to be removed from the magnitude of the overwhelming of a health care system when one is safe and secure in one's home. There is discussion of making patients DNR who need to be intubated to protect the doctors and respiratory therapists. Not patient directed DNR, but policy. In the U.S.
 
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Prancer

Needs More Sleep
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I didn't have a WFH one because I only had 2 links. But now I have 4! :D New thread coming up.

Topic of the day in my Pocket account :D.
 

once_upon

New condo owner
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13,392
There is discussion of making patients DNR who need to be intubated to protect the doctors and respiratory therapists. Not patient directed DNR, but policy. In the U.S.
I read this last night. As I understand it, this would be any patient who codes, ANY AGE not just the "grannies". Healthcare systems are so overwhelmed there is not a word or words to describe it.
 

snoopy

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I would be okay with that policy but many people would freak. Though the normally "concerned" conservatives may now be okay with such death panels it if improves the economy.
 

Barbara Manatee

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Messages
1,340
What's happening at work? Not much given that 3.3 million people out of work in the US as of this week's jobless numbers and 1.3 billion people in India told to stay at home.

India may finally force the needed conversations about the mass poverty and devastation that the shutdowns will cause. The poverty will be more irreversible than the virus if it doesn't stop soon. Maybe mass shutdowns are still the right choice, but let's have the conversations, understand the full impact, and decide knowing that they are condemning a portion of the world's population to misery that could last a lifetime. I don't want grannies to die, but we have to reframe the conversation and choices. I'd rather be an 80-year-old denied a spot in a Milan hospital than an unemployed laborer in New Delhi. No one is going to die of starvation in the US, but India is an entirely different story.
And how would you feel about being an unemployed laborer in New Delhi who is also denied medical care? If the spread of the virus goes unchecked because we choose the economy, we are condemning a substantial portion of the world to both poverty and illness.
 

skatfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,461
What's happening at work? Not much given that 3.3 million people out of work in the US as of this week's jobless numbers and 1.3 billion people in India told to stay at home.

India may finally force the needed conversations about the mass poverty and devastation that the shutdowns will cause. The poverty will be more irreversible than the virus if it doesn't stop soon. Maybe mass shutdowns are still the right choice, but let's have the conversations, understand the full impact, and decide knowing that they are condemning a portion of the world's population to misery that could last a lifetime. I don't want grannies to die, but we have to reframe the conversation and choices. I'd rather be an 80-year-old denied a spot in a Milan hospital than an unemployed laborer in New Delhi. No one is going to die of starvation in the US, but India is an entirely different story.
Louis, when you decide to volunteer your dad to go to work in that grocery store that wants him back (risking the health of your 90+ grandfather that he takes care of), I’ll take you seriously. Otherwise...
 

GarrAargHrumph

I can kill you with my brain
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18,861
Five people at my university have tested positive so far: three faculty (one hospitalized), and two students.

We have some students still living in the dorms, as they could not go home. They are being moved to specific dorms where they can be both consolidated and have more space from each other, and the remaining dorms are being given to the state to house medical workers.

Faculty are all working from home. We're allowed to work in our buildings if we can social distance, but my building is closed right now, anyway, since one of the *********-19 positive students had a class on the second floor. The uni is having the building cleaned by a company that specializes in this stuff, so we can't go in. Not that I'm interested in going in.

Of course, all classes have been moved online for the rest of the term. We restart on Monday after an extended spring break. I have been teaching online classes since... 2005? since forever. And I do a lot in Blackboard even for my in-person classes. So for me, moving my classes online is doable, and is done.

I know some faculty in my department are... not overly computer literate. But at least we're a business school, so in reality, even the least computer literate faculty in my department is head and shoulders above some of the people I know teaching in some other departments. Anyway, we have a department meeting (Webex) tomorrow at 2pm, which should be something. And Monday's class start should be interesting.
 
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MacMadame

My G.O.A.T is better than your G.O.A.T.
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I can't speak to India but in light of the $2T stimulus, I think we do need to evaluate where this is all taking us. It might not be a good place in terms of income and structural equality.
I just read that Finland has made our 2.2T package look like child's play (if you adjust the numbers based on GDP and population). They are placing their bet on this approach.

I tend to be more of a wait-and-see person when it comes to this crisis. Not for people who have lost their jobs but for stuff that we don't know the long-term ramifications. For example, why bail out certain industries before we know which industries need help to come back?

But I find their approach (and ours) kind of interesting. I'm not opposed to it. Money is, in the end, a social construct and there is no reason that the worlds' countries couldn't do some sort of debt restructuring/forgiveness once this is all over.

The important thing is that people can eat and have a roof over their heads. The rest is details IMO.

@Louis, I'd suggest you fly to NY and spend a day in one of the hospitals, or go back to Italy and see what's happening there.
He doesn't even have to fly. There is an article in the WaPo where a nurse took a film crew through 72 hours. He could watch it from the comfort of his well-appointed flat.

I have many RL friends who are nurses and the stuff they are reporting is seriously freaking me out. Much more so than the fact that the economy is in a bit of a standstill for a few months. (And actually, for many parts of the world, it's only been a few DAYS or at most weeks.)

When you consider that most of the world hasn't been in "quarantine" for very long and that some parts of the economy are actually thriving and that labor, which is supplied by people, is part of the economy, I find this willingness to sacrifice large parts of our population so the stock market recovers faster to be very weird. And short-sighted.

Topic of the day in my Pocket account :D.
Prancer always comes through with links! :D

I would be okay with that policy but many people would freak. Though the normally "concerned" conservatives may now be okay with such death panels it if improves the economy.
I am not okay with it because it's not what it sounds like. It's not that we're refusing to resuscitate people whose chance of recovering is pretty slim. Some of these people just stop breathing for a bit and a little bit of resuscitation brings them right back and they go on to lead healthy, productive lives.

This is something I think not everyone understands. When the media reports on these things and on how the person who died was "medically compromised," it sounds like it's only really sick people. But some of these "medically compromised" people just have asthma that's well controlled and they work full-time and/or volunteer in their communities. They lead active lives that contribute to both the economy and society.

There really isn't any reason, in a developed country with supposedly advanced medical care, that they should be dying over this virus. It's happening entirely because of mismanagement. And that, IMO, is criminal.
 

AnnM

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614
My office sent out an email yesterday asking us to refrain from using our own wipes and sprays on office door handles and surfaces because "they may affect the finish or cause rust" so yeah ..... :rolleyes:
 

Dobre

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6,700
My office sent out an email yesterday asking us to refrain from using our own wipes and sprays on office door handles and surfaces because "they may affect the finish or cause rust" so yeah .....
:rolleyes: Tell them they could supply you all with "their" spray. (The disinfectant I have been using is probably going to scratch up my handles. I thought I would look for another one the next time I shop, but most disinfectants are apparently out of stock so it's probably going to be what I've been using or liquid bleach).
 

Aceon6

Isolating from mean people
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19,949
My office sent out an email yesterday asking us to refrain from using our own wipes and sprays on office door handles and surfaces because "they may affect the finish or cause rust" so yeah ..... :rolleyes:
And my reply would be “I will be happy to as soon as you provide alcohol based wipes/sprays on both sides of every door in the building and one spray per every workspace row in addition to one in each and every common area. Please advise when we should expect them.”

But I’m a wise azz...
 

AnnM

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614
My office's pre-emptive response was to state that the janitors are cleaning those surfaces on a schedule. Never mind that people enter and exit spaces at any time. The executive staff's handling of all of this from the start has been frustrating and less than ideal.
 

Aceon6

Isolating from mean people
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19,949
My office's pre-emptive response was to state that the janitors are cleaning those surfaces on a schedule.
After every cough?

ETA, and why the f are janitors even there? Essential workers should be cleaning up after themselves.
 

Louis

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13,784
Yes, what's happening in Italy and New York hospitals is terrible, but so is what happens every day in New Delhi, Mumbai, and other cities where the lockdown is now the difference between being able to feed a family and not. Maybe people in their comfortable homes should think of that, too.

If we tried a different version of the lockdown, would we have the same or not-dissimilar numbers of people in Milan and New York hospitals, but fewer people starving to death in India, fewer than 3.3 million people in the US losing their jobs, and less than $2 trillion in new debt to repay? I think yes, absolutely. There's too much group-think and confirmation bias, and too little consideration of other sources, like the relatively ignored Oxford study (compared to the Imperial College study). The media sensationalism isn't helping either. Trump has given everyone two weeks to figure out that middle ground (to 60% public approval). I'm supportive and hopeful.

I'm concerned, though not surprised, that it has become taboo to question anything. People whisper, send private messages, etc. Very much in the same way that people who supported Trump or Brexit feel that they can't voice them in public society due to the PC police. (Caveat: I did not support Trump or Brexit.) Real and important dialogue is being silenced. Meanwhile, we have cops giving tickets to anyone they think is "not essential," patrolling the neighborhoods, drones posting pictures of people at parks to shame them into staying at home, relaxed rules on mobile phone providers sharing your data with the government, and all kinds of Big Brother initiatives marching in on a Trojan horse.

As for my elderly relatives, none of them is scared of this virus. My 90-year-old grandfather thinks the Texas lieutenant governor is right, and my 95-year-old cousin (or whatever he is) just wants to go to the casino, virus be damned. Both of their attitudes are basically "let it rip; whoever will die will die." But both of them have focused on living life, not avoiding death; they've also lived through world wars; both fought in combat; one was in a plane crash; etc. They'd rather die doing something they enjoy v. be stuck at home unable to see anyone or do anything. Neither is good with technology. Neither can really cook. Both are hard of hearing and have difficulties even talking on the phone. Their contact with the outside world is basically gone. For them, life under these restrictions is essentially sitting around waiting to die anyway. And, if they do die, it may be days or weeks for anyone to even realize they're gone.

I'll continue to hope for eased restrictions that give people sensible choices, while respecting the wishes of (and offering assistance to) those who wish to continue to quarantine for medical, risk, or other reasons.
 
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