What is happening at work?

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
Messages
22,675
I have to set up a sharepoint page as a resource for company memos re the virus.

Also our head office in Europe has told people they need to work at home. We may be going the same way here.

I am lucky that I will probably be able to continue working, unlike those in a number of other industries.
 

MacMadame

My G.O.A.T is better than your G.O.A.T.
Staff member
Messages
32,139
We have been WFH since Monday. But the office was open and some people were coming in. Today it was announced that the office will close indefinitely starting at 5pm today.

This is our CA office where the county is sheltering in place.

We have offices in Canada but they are run by another company. They sent one of those "what we are going about *********-19" earlier in the week and they were not doing as much as we were so I think they may not close the offices there.
 

Marge_Simpson

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,321
I’m a medical technologist, working in the blood bank at a NYC hospital.
Everyone must report to work as usual.
I’d say the atmosphere is one of raging paranoia.
 
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canbelto

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,921
Teacher here. Said goodbye to the students, some of whom were crying and anxious. Very sad day. Google classroom for me for at least a month.
 

misskarne

Handy Emergency Backup Mode
Messages
19,257
Public service here, for a very large agency with offices in every city. I am WFH this week as a precaution (got a cold - well, we're reasonably certain it's a cold...), and apparently 450 other staff are also doing so today. Our network is struggling a little.

They're doing staggered load testing with different offices all working from home on different days, culminating on Friday with Sydney (the largest office) all working from home to test it. If that works, I fully expect us to go full agency WFH on Monday.
 

Immortelle

Well-Known Member
Messages
660
I’m an audiologist. Head office is WFH or staggered shifts but the clinics are still open with signs, hand sanitizers and regular hand washing going on. I think we’ll start shutting some clinics temporarily in the coming days/weeks.
 

judiz

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,299
I teach in a daycare in New Jersey. We were closed today because one of the parents was tested on Friday And has not received the results yet. Tomorrow the school will be professionally cleaned and then the plan is to reopen on Wednesday, regardless of the parents test results. Even though public, private and religious schools are closed, daycares are being allowed to stay open. Needless to say, I am not happy.
 

doubleturn

Rinkside on my iPhone
Messages
450
I’m the Desktop Support Specialist that is collaborating to help get 80 call center employees (in my office) ready to work from home by the end of the week.

Nothing says fun like having the server go down all day when you’re trying to reprogram today’s batch of phones into VPN Mode.

PSA for today: Don’t %^^%%** if/when you have to call into IT. We’re trying to get everyone working from home as fast as we can. We can’t leave to work from home ourselves until we get you all set. A little patience will improve our attitudes!

PSA #2: When you come back to working in the office, whatever process was followed before will need to be reversed. Again, a little patience is greatly appreciated!
 

MacMadame

My G.O.A.T is better than your G.O.A.T.
Staff member
Messages
32,139
We have been WFH since Monday. But the office was open and some people were coming in. Today it was announced
We have offices in Canada but they are run by another company. They sent one of those "what we are going about *********-19" earlier in the week and they were not doing as much as we were so I think they may not close the offices there.
They just sent out a notice that they are Level III and everyone is WFH. Whew.
 

Karen-W

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,988
Home mortgage division of a major US bank and we are still working on site though they have told us to take our laptops home every night and be prepared for the possibility of WFH. My commute was glorious today - same amount of time as it was on NYE. My commute will be even more glorious if they shift us to WFH, which we all think is coming since our governor just instituted a ban on gatherings of 25+ people and closed all restaurants & bars this afternoon. Current prediction is we will be WFH by next Monday.
 

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
1,844
I'm Bay Area adjacent, and I suspect shelter in place is coming here too in the next few days. I was told today that the company I work for is going to be considered essential and so we'll still be able to work. Except I definitely would rather stay home.
 

ribbon

Well-Known Member
Messages
197
I work in a massage studio. We are still taking clients who have doctor referrals for pain. We thought business would slow, and it has a bit but I’m surprised how many doctors there are who are still telling their patients to seek treatment from us. I know things like frozen shoulder must be terrible to deal with and any relief helps, but at the same time, if I were a doctor I’d be advising them to try to wait.
 

Aceon6

Isolating from mean people
Messages
19,887
@ribbon Thank you for working. A family member had shoulder surgery in February and needs you plus her PT to insure a proper recovery.

My former work is 99% WFH using infrastructure that’s tried and tested through several blizzards and building problems. The other 1% (about 20 people) are rotating as onsite computer hardware people, configuring backup equipment, sanitizing monitors so people can take them home, and receiving equipment deliveries.
 
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Louis

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,758
Mandatory work from home.

Hiring freeze. Contractor ban. Furlough for workers whose jobs cannot be done from home (unsure whether this is paid or not).

Budget cuts - all travel and expense set to zero for the quarter.

All capex projects delayed.

IT to work on only essential services.

Fun, fun, fun.... I'm grateful that I'm not affected (and have a guaranteed package if I become affected), but the economic damage of this may cause more sickness and death than the virus, with people across the globe forced into poverty and stressful living conditions.

I don't see how students graduating from university are ever going to get a job (unless they have one already). No one is hiring, and it's dangerous to even interview.
 

flyingsit

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,019
My company has the majority of people WFH anyway. i work in clinical research and it’s a combination of business as usual and a lot of scrambling to figure out how trials can continue while minimizing in-person visits etc.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
22,662
I'm grateful that I'm not affected (and have a guaranteed package if I become affected), but the economic damage of this may cause more sickness and death than the virus, with people across the globe forced into poverty and stressful living conditions.
Yes. :wuzrobbed

I live in a city where housing is already a problem due to outrageous costs and short supply for renters. Students and poor families are already living in too-tight accommodation situations. If those who work in minimum wage jobs or close to it at restaurants, fast food and retail outlets lose their jobs, it's not going to be pretty.

Please tell me I'm just being paranoid, but I feel we are witnessing the end of the world as we know it. Please tell me I'm wrong.

Then of course there are the catastrophic losses due to the stock market. I'm guessing that housing markets will crumble too. In general that might not be a bad there in the hyper-expensive I live in. But for the economy, somewhat of a death knoll.
 

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,311
United Way 211 operator: The bad: the lack of testing and testing info and I know that is a problem everywhere. Our problem with the county health dept forwarding all of their calls to us regarding this subject remains frustrating. The good: Over the last three decades our United Way chapter has a huge warehouse stocked with items...for the freight fee companies like Bed, Bath and Beyond, Amazon, Walmart, office supply stores, fabric stores and many others deliver merchandise that never left their shelves. It is nice to be able to give away a warm comforter to a poor family that could truly use it. The public doesn't visit "GIVE" but groups come in for an hour each month and pick what they need for their clients. We've been hearing about a certain willingness to help those who cannot get out and certain regret with some of the panic buying. So GIVE is setting up a program to donate toilet paper, bottled water and cleaning supplies. I can see this expanding into other areas for the unique problems that arise when one is stuck at home. We need to look out for one another. We are trying.
 

sk8pics

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,553
I am retired but was texting with multiple former coworkers yesterday. Things were crazy for them. Early on Monday they were working on plans to have a rotating shifts on site, with 60% of the time WFH for those who could. Then they were told the site was closing. Then leadership said the site was not closing for long. Then by the end of the day they were told the site was closed, no word on when reopening (at least 2 weeks). Not clear what is happening to folks who can’t WFH. Even the people who can WFH are not going to be able to do it indefinitely. This is in Philadelphia. I’m going to check in with more people today and see how they are doing.
 

Zemgirl

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,730
I'm in my office at the university - it's just me and the admins today, and tomorrow the university is shutting down except for a minimal number of necessary personnel (maybe the distance learning support team?). I only came in to pick up some things I'll need for my teaching, and it feels surreal to know that we're shutting down with no idea of when we'll be back.

Good luck to all of us, and especially to those of you in medical and medical-adjacent professions.
 

miffy

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,847
I manage a call centre that is open 7 days a week and I have 4 supervisors to look after staff. 3 are now in isolation as their friend has tested positive. If any of the 3 test positive we all need to isolate. All 3 of them were at work last week and were also at my 40th birthday party on Friday along with the rest of my department, and hugged and kissed everyone. It’s a bit of a tense time and I do feel silly for not cancelling my party :wuzrobbed
 

becca

Well-Known Member
Messages
19,605
It’s all scary I work as an insurance adjuster on phones they are now picking some people to work from home. And I guess who knows rest of us I am so scared
 

AxelAnnie

Graceful men lift lovely girls in white!
Messages
11,978
I run a small business that serves documents in in complex litigatiig. Think Clergy Pedofile priests it or the Hugh California fires And maintains a website with all the filed with courts.We are web based. And the documents are all available 24/7/365. Guy

And positioned to work from homes.
 

Louis

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,758
Please tell me I'm just being paranoid, but I feel we are witnessing the end of the world as we know it. Please tell me I'm wrong.
I don't think it's the end of the world. At some point, people will rebel and resume some kind of normal life, virus be damned. If the countries are smart - and sadly, I don't think they are - they would use this shutdown to rapidly ramp up medical capacity: taking over private hospitals, converting auditoriums to makeshift hospitals, procuring additional equipment, rapidly triaging so that the lowest level medical professionals are more empowered to make decisions about simple cases while doctors handle only the most complex, etc. The point of this shut-down should be to prepare the medical system to handle more patients, not to eradicate the virus. It will take 18 months to either eradicate it or come up with a vaccine, at which point we'll have wiped out 90% of the world's wealth.

This whole dilemma raises complex ethical questions about the value of a life. Bear with me, because what I'm about to write can be perceived as really cold, but needs to be said. We're shutting down the world economy to save a few thousand lives of predominantly older, sick people who have high statistical likelihood of dying anyway in the next 2-5 years. How many lives will we lose because people are forced into poverty, depression, homelessness, substance abuse, and other despair as a result of shutting down the world economy? We need to look at both sides of the equation, and I daresay come up with some reasonable measure to put value on life. Thus far, each life saved has cost the world billions of dollars. Meanwhile, other sick people are dying as the ******** consumes 100%+ of medical system resources; all preventative and non-urgent treatment is shutdown, and a portion of people will develop serious illnesses and die because of it. This is all going to snowball. At some point, we're going to have to get real about the cost, the long-term economic damage and crippling social and personal debt that younger people will face as a result of this, and make a decision about what kinds of risks we can live with. We're going to have to make real tradeoffs of risk v. reward; which lives get saved and which don't. Nobody wants to believe that we may have to live with the risk that the majority of people 80+ will be killed with nothing we can do to stop it (including shutting down the world economy). I really hate to say it, but the situation in Italy is showing that this may be the case. Pray for a vaccine.
 
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BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
55,640
oops this thread is supposed to be about our own work places I'm going to move my above post to another thread.

Very small nonprofit association in D.C. for me. We are mostly working from home and we're all on slack. Its going to take me awhile to get my home set up comfortable.

Much easier to be in the office and its find to be there because almost no one is there and we're very spaced out but I'm not riding even an uncrowded bus which means a round trip of six miles walking and that's bit much on my hips so can't do it every day.

ETA: what I meant to add, our association gets most of its annual income from our annual conference. Conference is scheduled for July. We have a steering committee call this morning. I think we should try to postpone rather than waiting and seeing. What are others seeing out there?
 

jeffisjeff

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,993
Work for me is crazy.
Too many questions from faculty, staff and students.
Too many Zoom meetings from the administration to keep us all updated*.
A course I completely need to rework for online delivery (I tell my students that this is a class where all you need to do is show up prepared for class, pay attention and participate and you'll get an A).
Too many collaborators thinking that now we finally have some quite time to make progress on this research project. :scream:

*We one of these this morning. The admin wanted to make sure we all knew the university is currently at just level 2 of possible responses. They reviewed what level 2 means, and then levels 3, 4 and 5. At which point someone asked: At what level do we stop trying to teach online? The response: Never! Online delivery continues at all levels! Online delivery would continue even in an apocalypse! I guess they really don't want to have refund all that tuition! :rolleyes:
 

vesperholly

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,727
I don't think it's the end of the world. At some point, people will rebel and resume some kind of normal life, virus be damned. If the countries are smart - and sadly, I don't think they are - they would use this shutdown to rapidly ramp up medical capacity: taking over private hospitals, converting auditoriums to makeshift hospitals, procuring additional equipment, rapidly triaging so that the lowest level medical professionals are more empowered to make decisions about simple cases while doctors handle only the most complex, etc. The point of this shut-down should be to prepare the medical system to handle more patients, not to eradicate the virus. It will take 18 months to either eradicate it or come up with a vaccine, at which point we'll have wiped out 90% of the world's wealth.

This whole dilemma raises complex ethical questions about the value of a life. Bear with me, because what I'm about to write can be perceived as really cold, but needs to be said. We're shutting down the world economy to save a few thousand lives of predominantly older, sick people who have high statistical likelihood of dying anyway in the next 2-5 years. How many lives will we lose because people are forced into poverty, depression, homelessness, substance abuse, and other despair as a result of shutting down the world economy? We need to look at both sides of the equation, and I daresay come up with some reasonable measure to put value on life. Thus far, each life saved has cost the world billions of dollars. Meanwhile, other sick people are dying as the ******** consumes 100%+ of medical system resources; all preventative and non-urgent treatment is shutdown, and a portion of people will develop serious illnesses and die because of it. This is all going to snowball. At some point, we're going to have to get real about the cost, the long-term economic damage and crippling social and personal debt that younger people will face as a result of this, and make a decision about what kinds of risks we can live with. We're going to have to make real tradeoffs of risk v. reward; which lives get saved and which don't. Nobody wants to believe that we may have to live with the risk that the majority of people 80+ will be killed with nothing we can do to stop it (including shutting down the world economy). I really hate to say it, but the situation in Italy is showing that this may be the case. Pray for a vaccine.
I agree Louis. There are seriously profound effects to the economy that people don't even want to consider over the "sacrament of life" or whatever.

Several vaccines are being tested:
 
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