US elections 2021-2022

rfisher

Let the skating begin
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70,488
I requested help on a matter from Manchin and his office is all over it. Like multiple emails and phone calls in just 24 hours. I'm being very complimentary to his staff (I used the Dr. card :shuffle:) I'll tell them to pass along my issues with his voting record after they get what I need. Then, I'll tell them I'm never voting for him again because I won't be a resident after the summer. :lol:

But, he does have a very nice and efficient office staff both instate in in his D.C. office. Of course, what I need will be easily obtained if we can just get the federal agency involved to actually read email, letters, or pick up the phone. He (his staff) is contacting the director of the agency. This is something he can easily tout as a win on his part to protect and serve his constituents.
 
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caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
Messages
17,650
I'm torn over retirements where those primaries are the reason (I don't know if it really was his reason, so this is mostly in general). On the one hand, I understand that Republicans facing a Trumpian candidate think they don't have a chance and don't want to go through that. On the other hand, it seems like they're surrendering their party to fascism. If all sane Republicans stop running, that leaves only one kind of Republicans... And Youngkin should have proven that non-Trumpists stand a chance. Sure, he may not have been nominated had there been a primary but Republicans set the rules, don't they? Shouldn't they be able to keep holding conventions instead of primaries if they want to?

With regards to Virginia, I read that Loudoun County turnout was what lost it for McAuliffe; McAuliffe would have needed to win by a larger margin.
But it's the same old song: turnout. Did anyone hear if McAuliffe had a good ground game?

The other day, Youngkin announced that he wants to use an EO to pull out of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative. He claims, it'll save residential customers a little under $5 a month on their energy bill. I guess, those at the coast will save even more once their homes are under water and those who are in the fishing business will also save a lot more on electricity when they lose their livelihoods and become homeless once their businesses go down the drain.

Sarcasm aside, it's questionable if Youngkin can do it per EO but it still makes me want to cry. Literally. There has been so much progress and it hurts that he wants to roll it all back. It's stupid, senseless and short-sighted. How about initiatives that make us more electricity conscious so that we use less and save money that way?
America can’t solve the whole problem alone! Virginia alone can’t contribute anything. China and Russia don’t even enforce any of their environmental laws. Same thing with India as well! Why do anything when India doesn’t?
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
8,135
Sunday's WP Magazine covered Yale Law School elitist J.D. Vance now running for Senate under the anti-elitist banner:
Apparently much of this recent change comes down to hurt feelings over the badly reviewed movie based on his book:
When the “Hillbilly Elegy” movie came out on Netflix in 2020, it was not just critically panned but greeted with intense online mockery, and the tenuous cultural diplomacy achieved by the book seemed to unravel for good. (Rotten Tomatoes audience score: 83 percent. Critics’ score: 25 percent.) According to Vance’s best friend from Yale, Jamil Jivani, the wounding commentary was the “last straw” in his falling-out with elites.
An analysis of his campaign strategy:
This past summer, Times columnist Ross Douthat, a NatCon fellow traveler, appeared on the podcast of his colleague Ezra Klein. Klein asked him, essentially, What happened to J.D. Vance? Douthat had a few answers, among them a stylistic point: If you need to play to the Trump base — which Vance suddenly, desperately, needs to do — it’s not a bad idea to do so via online trolling: “You can own the libs without going on long paranoid spiels about all your enemies within the Republican Party who have failed to steal the election for you.”
But that pesky elitism label that follows him is so hard to leave in the past when #2 Vance is running against #1 Mandel in the GOP primary race for the bottom of the barrel :lol: :
Vance’s media strategy seems to be that by playing Don Jr. on the Internet, he can push for more substantive populism in real life. The success of that tactic may depend on how far removed he truly seems from the Brookings Institution-to-Netflix pipeline he was riding until recently. In November, Vance tweeted an invitation to join him and Peter Thiel for an exclusive dinner — to whoever donated $10,800 by the next day. “This will be a small group, with good food and better company,” Vance wrote. On Twitter, Mandel replied with a picture of himself outside a Denny’s. He wrote: “BERKSHIRE, OH — For $10.80 anyone can join me eating fries off the hood of the car from a gas station Denny’s at midnight.”
 
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Susan1

Well-Known Member
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11,172
 

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
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21,877
The panel's two Democrats, Sen. Vernon Sykes and Rep. Emilia Sykes, his daughter, said the ruling confirmed Democrats' contention that the lines were “unfair, unrepresentative and unconstitutional.”

Republican Gov. Mike DeWine, a member of the commission and whose son was among Wednesday's dissenting justices, pledged in a statement to "work with my fellow Redistricting Commission members on revised maps that are consistent with the court’s order.”
There is something very wrong where a father and daughter serve on the same commission and a son is one of the justices responsible for reviewing the legality of his father's actions.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
17,369
^On that note, I misunderstood something the other day and thought a priest had announced his candidacy for governor in PA. (He hadn't). It made me reflect on ministers (priests, pastors, reverends, rabbies etc) in government; in a country where church and state are supposed to be separate, isn't it wrong for a minister to be an active minister (as in carrying out their paid job as a minister) while also serving in government? Should ministers be required to take a leave of absence and not preach while serving in government to emphasize separation of church and state?

And yes, as much as I share his views, wish there were more of the likes of him in politics and believe that he's not a threat to democracy (to the contrary), I realize that this would also apply to Warnock and I would not have a problem with that.
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
Father Robert Drinan was a congressman was Massachusetts and it was pope John Paul II who banned any priest from being in elected office and he just has an interesting story if you Would like to read about it!
 

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
Messages
25,705
^On that note, I misunderstood something the other day and thought a priest had announced his candidacy for governor in PA. (He hadn't). It made me reflect on ministers (priests, pastors, reverends, rabbies etc) in government; in a country where church and state are supposed to be separate, isn't it wrong for a minister to be an active minister (as in carrying out their paid job as a minister) while also serving in government? Should ministers be required to take a leave of absence and not preach while serving in government to emphasize separation of church and state?

And yes, as much as I share his views, wish there were more of the likes of him in politics and believe that he's not a threat to democracy (to the contrary), I realize that this would also apply to Warnock and I would not have a problem with that.
I suppose you can take a moral position on anyone who runs for office. And there is always going to be some personal interest for why people run. But I think you also need to do the job properly and be professional. And do what is best for the community.

We have a politician here where I live called Jacqui Lambie. She went into the Australian Senate on the back of a guy named Clive Palmer who is a bit of idiot. However she has grown as a politician and now stands pretty much as an independent. She is straight talking and she can come across as a unsophisticated. However she will send out surveys asking her constituents how she should vote on particular issues which I really appreciate. And sometimes those outcomes are not what you expect and usually for the best. She also reads every bit of legislation that is up for debate which is a lot of work. I certainly have changed my opinion of her since I moved to Tasmania.
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
There is no doubt Sinema is going to suffer for not being like most democrats and going from:
-the filibuster is one of the most vital things to protect the minority
To
-we must abolish the filibuster
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
Republicans performance in Redistricting has Been so catastrophic they aren’t even really favored to win control of the house anymore just based on Redistricting


Independent commissions are creating democratic seats and eliminating Republican seats.

Democratic gerrymanders are extreme in Illinois and New York eliminating more than half dozen republicans

Judges are ordering creation of racial gerrymanders that had lost favor among judges in the 90’s which means more democrats

Where republicans have control they aren’t gerrymandering at all
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
I live in North Carolina. Stop projecting your fantasy onto our lived reality
Did you even read the article? Republicans are not doing anything close to what democrats are doing and therefore can’t be seen as using their powers to gerrymander
 

Taso

Well-Known Member
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7,314
Did you even read the article? Republicans are not doing anything close to what democrats are doing and therefore can’t be seen as using their powers to gerrymander
I live in the most liberal city in my state and we are so gerrymandered we literally have a neo-Nazi as our representative in the US house. How much do you think I give a shit about this?
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
I live in the most liberal city in my state and we are so gerrymandered we literally have a neo-Nazi as our representative in the US house. How much do you think I give a shit about this?
Lol neo nazi. Take a chill pill

As far as I know Durham elects a democrat anyway. David price democrat represents Durham


If a neo nazi was in the house democrats should bring expulsion vote
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
Judges ruled Asheville couldn’t be split anymore. Even when it wasn’t the democrat who won wasn’t exactly liberal. Heath shuler was more liberal than the district but definitely less liberal than Asheville
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
8,135
Where republicans have control they aren’t gerrymandering at all
It's amusing that you're chastising others about reading an article that includes this:
In contrast, experts say Republicans, who control more states, have gerrymandered heavily in places like Texas, North Carolina and Ohio. But the GOP’s Ohio maps were tossed out by the state Supreme Court this month, and Democrats are hopeful North Carolina’s high court follows suit with the districts there, part of the reason for the party’s increased optimism.
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
8,135
A better question might be: Why does it take a state Supreme Court decision to require legislators to act within the parameters of the will and mandate by over 75% of a state's voters? It was made very clear where I live that no court case was ever needed in the first place.

I support the approach of the League of Women Voters, who act against gerrymandering no matter the party who is doing it. Just call it out for what it is instead of picking and choosing states based on your individual political beliefs.
 

Louis

Private citizen
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17,238
Republicans are donating money to Democrats and people are upset over it? :confused: Given that many of these Republicans also donated to Biden instead of Trump, I tend to think they're genuine centrists v. :EVILLE: conspirators. Many of you begged sane Republicans to cross over in 2020 to get Biden elected, promising that he was a moderate despite his platform, and you now seem upset that some people have crossed over and are supporting moderate Democrats instead of Republicans.

If big GOP donors are donating to Democrats, this is a victory for you - not a conspiracy. Be happy someone like Sinema is getting these dollars instead of someone like Marjorie Taylor-Greene or Madison Cawthorn.
 

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
Messages
25,705
Republicans are donating money to Democrats and people are upset over it? :confused: Given that many of these Republicans also donated to Biden instead of Trump, I tend to think they're genuine centrists v. :EVILLE: conspirators. Many of you begged sane Republicans to cross over in 2020 to get Biden elected, promising that he was a moderate despite his platform, and you now seem upset that some people have crossed over and are supporting moderate Democrats instead of Republicans.

If big GOP donors are donating to Democrats, this is a victory for you - not a conspiracy. Be happy someone like Sinema is getting these dollars instead of someone like Marjorie Taylor-Greene or Madison Cawthorn.
Shouldn't the concern be about politicians taking money from big political donors generally?
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
8,135
WP has an article about Tim Ryan's Senate run in OH:
Ryan’s bet — and the national Democratic dream — is that a few issues still just might matter more than his party label. He lists three whenever he speaks, after talking up his small-town upbringing and all of his union relatives who once worked at steel plants or auto suppliers: rebuilding the country with major public works spending, new government investing in manufacturing industries and beating China.

“They have a 10-year plan, a 50-year plan, a 100-year plan,” he said of the Asian superpower. “We are living in a 24-hour news cycle talking about really dumb stuff, like Big Bird and Dr. Seuss.”
Asked how he would fight the seemingly inevitable Republican claims that he is a socialist, he had a quick answer. “We don’t do socialism in Youngstown,” he said.
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
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17,650
They don’t really like abortion or gun control either and he used to reflect that but doesn’t at all anymore which is his biggest problem. He could easily be elected in San Francisco now or any liberal college town! He charged a lot.
 

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