Things I’m sick of tbh.....

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
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20,077
Watch any serial killer show, and the childhood invariably sounds a lot like what we're mandating - isolated, aloof, trouble understanding emotions of others, no interest in activities. We're training children and others to be inhuman, to see themselves as nothing more than vectors of disease.
Get help. I have already suggested a good treatment. It will make life so much more tolerable for you, and not just during you-know-what.
 

sk8nlizard

Well-Known Member
Messages
895
Children worry about C19 only because we've conditioned them to worry about C19. Some of us (well, you) have indoctrinated these harmful beliefs in them, much the way religious zealots do. No child should be worrying about being a disease vector, killing their grandparents, or anything of the sort. Children are at more risk of dying from drowning or being struck by lightning than from C19.

I came across a good article today about the scientific dishonesty in masking of children in schools. (Author is a professor of immunology.)


Among other downsides, the author points out, "[t]he problem with overselling unproven recommendations is that it risks turning people away from well-grounded ones."

My children wear masks, we live in Texas so they are one of few. At school, they put their masks on before they get out of the car and take them off when they get home. They do take them off for lunch and snack but not for PE or recess. They have both been back in their sports since May 2020. My kids are 8 and 10 but they know the risks and they are not terrified of C-19. They have a healthy respect for it because it is dangerous but they wear their masks and go on with their lives. I know that we are not as strict as some in here and more strict than others. My son is a gymnast, he wears his mask for warm up and stretching but is unmasked all other times, I imagine this is where he picked up C-19. We let him do competitions this past season. He also takes tennis and wears a mask while doing so. This summer he took speed and agility classes to help with his gymnastics and wore a mask for that, with no complaints. My daughter plays on 2 soccer teams, that is unmasked but outside. This past winter they had some indoor training that we opted out of because we felt the spread was too high where we live. She does taekwondo masked as well as takes piano lessons masked. They both also take figure skating lessons, masked. They never say a word about the masks. I have plenty of pictures and videos with them doing fine, even in the massively hot summer with their masks on. This summer we allowed a lot more when cases were low, we went to museums, aquariums, I took my son to see the Gymnastics Olympic Trials which required a plane flight. We even went to Disney World and Universal. My kids just knew they would wear their masks, they don’t say a peep and it hasn’t caused them any grief. My son caught C-19 last week, he did not worry he was going to die or get very ill though he is smart enough to know that could happen. He luckily only had a runny nose. When he returns to school and activities he will still wear a mask until he can be vaxxed. His social skills and mental health have not been damaged from masks and we have been lucky to not lose anyone close to us during this time (everyone wears masks and are vaxxed). Plus many of my children’s friends have parents that are health care workers, every single one is masking and their kids are masking but they are allowed to do activities.
Also, I despise when people use drowning and getting struck by lightning as examples. I get the point they are trying to make, very few kids die from these things. However, my kids still had swimming lessons, are watched in the pool now even though they’ve been on summer swim teams and wear life jackets when needed. I also don’t let my kids play outside in a lightening storm. To me, the precautions I take for those two things are the same as my kids wearing masks and not going to some places during times of high spread. I’m sure all these people crying no masks for kids wouldn’t allow their kids to swim if they didn’t know how, but hey there’s just a small risk of drowning 🙄.
And I write none of this to say how wonderful my kids are. I know C-19 is affecting children in many ways, but I look at our school district that has been open for 1.5 weeks, masks optional, no quarantine (including if you have someone at your house positive for C-19), no distancing, assemblies, etc. We have over 600 cases already but that’s self reporting and I know FOR A FACT many people aren’t reporting because they don’t want the numbers to go up and masks to be required. Last year, my district was in school full time with masks required and quarantine for the entire school year and at our absolute highest (in January) we had 313 cases in the district. Having to close schools is going to impact these kids a lot more than having to wear a mask. There are many things that children will have to deal with as repercussions from this awful time, but wearing masks for a bit, I just don’t believe it. Okay, back off my soap box and back into isolation for C-19 that I caught from my kid.
 

tony

But it just doesn't fcuking glide
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10,932
IMO, I don't think it's that far of a stretch to question the long-term issues that are stemming from a lot of CV regulations. I also personally find it a bit weird that people here are saying that kids have access to news and fully understand what is going on. Sorry, they don't. Even if they have great parents that explained everything going on in the world to them (without endlessly scaring them), it still doesn't mean they really get it. If you were a wonder-kid who knew everything at elementary school age, realize that this isn't normal. For most kids, even up through their teenage years, CV came and took away any semblance normalcy very quickly and here we have people acting like kids just 'get' it. It extends far past pre-teens, though. Imagine going through your high school years having classes rotate between completely at home and trying to be in person, no prom, no local football games to attend, no moving away to college or into a dorm right away- none of that. Kids who have been thrown into shifting methods of learning for the last year and a half not only are having a difficult time keeping up from a book-smart sense, but they are also missing out on a lot of the most important times in finding their identities and personality traits. Even if you're a big introvert, imagine having a small group of friends that you saw every day at school and all of a sudden you have nothing to do and don't ever see them.

There are a lot of people in this world that thrive off of constant human interaction and have struggled through lockdowns. There are a lot of adults who have greatly struggled with their lives being pulled from under them and they've had to make huge changes and/or deal with depression or loss. Sometimes, I read the comments on these threads and feel like they follow the same groupthink (such as comments like 'everyone can work from home') or they are coming from the eyes of people who have been relatively content with having to sit home either for many months or even this whole time. But not everyone is wired the same-- especially kids who are still developing. When I was growing up, there were kids that could be held back a grade if they were socially immature.
 

canbelto

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,909
I'm not saying these situations are ideal. I'm saying that @Louis making accusations that wearing masks is paramount to child abuse is offensive.

It's also something that's actually happening as parents in Facebook groups are talking about doing that to teachers who enforce a mask rule in school. So this isn't even funny -- it's something that is actually being planned to sandbag people.
 

sk8nlizard

Well-Known Member
Messages
895
IMO, I don't think it's that far of a stretch to question the long-term issues that are stemming from a lot of CV regulations. I also personally find it a bit weird that people here are saying that kids have access to news and fully understand what is going on. Sorry, they don't. Even if they have great parents that explained everything going on in the world to them (without endlessly scaring them), it still doesn't mean they really get it. If you were a wonder-kid who knew everything at elementary school age, realize that this isn't normal. For most kids, even up through their teenage years, CV came and took away any semblance normalcy very quickly and here we have people acting like kids just 'get' it. It extends far past pre-teens, though. Imagine going through your high school years having classes rotate between completely at home and trying to be in person, no prom, no local football games to attend, no moving away to college or into a dorm right away- none of that. Kids who have been thrown into shifting methods of learning for the last year and a half not only are having a difficult time keeping up from a book-smart sense, but they are also missing out on a lot of the most important times in finding their identities and personality traits. Even if you're a big introvert, imagine having a small group of friends that you saw every day at school and all of a sudden you have nothing to do and don't ever see them.

There are a lot of people in this world that thrive off of constant human interaction and have struggled through lockdowns. There are a lot of adults who have greatly struggled with their lives being pulled from under them and they've had to make huge changes and/or deal with depression or loss. Sometimes, I read the comments on these threads and feel like they follow the same groupthink (such as comments like 'everyone can work from home') or they are coming from the eyes of people who have been relatively content with having to sit home either for many months or even this whole time. But not everyone is wired the same-- especially kids who are still developing. When I was growing up, there were kids that could be held back a grade if they were socially immature.
While I don’t Disagree with this and I definitely think it is harder in high school age kids. If people wore their masks and got vaccinated, we wouldn’t be as bad off as we are right now. Where I live our adult ICU is 95% full and our PICU is often out of beds in a 19 county area. Every once in a while a bed opens up but that goes quickly. It’s not just C-19 it’s also RSV and a whole host of other things. But wearing the masks, allows kids to stay in school, and to have some semblance of normalcy. And to be very clear, I have never been one to see things shut down for long, including schools. I think it’s very important for these things to be open, but it can be done safely until everyone is eligible to be vaxxed. Sending my kids into schools were masks AND vax by teachers, students, or anyone that came into the building (yes parents are allowed to come eat with their kids, and volunteer in classrooms) aren’t required was stressful.
 

tony

But it just doesn't fcuking glide
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10,932
While I don’t Disagree with this and I definitely think it is harder in high school age kids. If people wore their masks and got vaccinated, we wouldn’t be as bad off as we are right now. Where I live our adult ICU is 95% full and our PICU is often out of beds in a 19 county area. Every once in a while a bed opens up but that goes quickly. It’s not just C-19 it’s also RSV and a whole host of other things. But wearing the masks, allows kids to stay in school, and to have some semblance of normalcy. And to be very clear, I have never been one to see things shut down for long, including schools. I think it’s very important for these things to be open, but it can be done safely until everyone is eligible to be vaxxed. Sending my kids into schools were masks AND vax by teachers, students, or anyone that came into the building (yes parents are allowed to come eat with their kids, and volunteer in classrooms) aren’t required was stressful.
Absolutely agree with you. :) I'm not suggesting that everything needs to just be opened and wish for the best, but I think we need to see both sides of the coin: doing what is reasonably necessary and also understanding some of the things that will pop up long-term. I'm going through my own circle of drama where future 'medical professionals' want to quote Facebook and Quora as their sources of information on why they refuse to get vaccinated, so I get that this is going to require people working together much more than they are before we get back to some kind of normal-- that, and I live in Florida :lol:. But I think everyone understands education-wise, most children from preschool age up through graduating high school are going to be way behind in overall knowledge and skill level for a long time because of these constantly shifting methods and/or because many kids can't focus at home, and with that we also have to understand the long-term consequences of children emotionally and socially rather than posters suggesting they more-or-less understand everything.
 

Debdelilah2

Member
Messages
22
Children worry about C19 only because we've conditioned them to worry about C19. Some of us (well, you) have indoctrinated these harmful beliefs in them, much the way religious zealots do. No child should be worrying about being a disease vector, killing their grandparents, or anything of the sort. Children are at more risk of dying from drowning or being struck by lightning than from C19.

I came across a good article today about the scientific dishonesty in masking of children in schools. (Author is a professor of immunology.)



Among other downsides, the author points out, "[t]he problem with overselling unproven recommendations is that it risks turning people away from well-grounded ones."
I think a lot of the issues could have been helped if an option for distance learning was active. If kids have to be in school in person and that’s a requirement, that’s another kind of mandate. They don’t have the choice to get up and step away because the person next to them is coughing; they have to sit at their desks.
The socialization aspect is not the same now as it was in the beginning. Here in Virginia masking indoors is recommended but outdoors is considered safe and playgrounds are open. Kids can hang out outside unmasked and play and be active. When masked they are also reading people’s eye expressions and body language- it is not an absence of expression; it’s more like if you broke your dominant wrist and had to write with your non-dominant one, which becomes stronger. The depression and obesity I think might date more to earlier times in the ********* and job uncertainty, political uncertainty, and other forms of stress. We are still in the ********* but the general stress seems a lot lower now.
To me, the mask mandate is a center of the road compromise, because it goes hand in hand with the in person school mandate. Both sides of the political aisle had to compromise. But if they made exceptions here and there for medical or anxiety issues, I don’t think I would object, as long as they were proactive in making sure anyone showing symptoms stayed home.
I don’t understand why you’re saying worrying about a grandparent isn’t valid. The elderly were vaccinated first and their immunity doesn’t last as long. Some kids live in multigenerational households, or just want to visit their grandparents again. My stepdad, who is 75 and survived a pulmonary embolism a couple years ago, is happy to see the grandkids, but only because they wear masks at school. The risk is too high otherwise. Meanwhile a second cousin I barely know is suffering in an ICU in Pennsylvania right now, near his 50th birthday, with this.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
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24,805
No, I won't shut up, glorify teachers, or succumb to this groupthink that continues to ignore the impact of C19 restrictions on children (and others).

Watch any serial killer show, and the childhood invariably sounds a lot like what we're mandating - isolated, aloof, trouble understanding emotions of others, no interest in activities. We're training children and others to be inhuman, to see themselves as nothing more than vectors of disease.

We sweep under the rug frightening statistics about suicide, eating disorders, obesity, mental health -- all of which seem to be even more severe in children. It is large-scale abuse, sanctioned by the government and teacher's unions, and I won't be quiet about it.

@Louis, this post is illogical, and you're generally quite logical.

Practices and rules to protect people/kids from C19 and restrict the transmission of C19 aim to save lives, not torture people.

Would you rather kids got sick and maybe died, or transmitted C19 to others who got sick and maybe died?

Your serial killer analogy is also illogical. We are not talking about an entire childhood here, just 1-2 years of a child's life. And we are not talking about negative or willful abuse. Again, we are talking about protection.

And, I don't agree that we sweep statistics about suicide etc. under the rug. I've read a lot about the negative impacts of C19 on mental health and obesity. But the bottom line is, the alternative is worse.
 
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Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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25,560
Some people seem to think there’s a magical way we could have gotten out of this global health crisis unscathed. We couldn’t and there wasn’t. There isn’t some version of reality where we ignored a once in a generation pan-demic until it went away and everything was just fine.

Kids are going to experience some trauma from living through a global pan-demic. That is a fact and there was no way around that fact. Pretending it wasn’t happening and letting millions more people become disabled or die would also have caused kids trauma. As adults, most of us are also going to come out of this with trauma. Many of us a lot more than young kids who are pretty adaptable and resilient and don’t worry as much as adults do.

People who lived through the Great Depression or the world wars also experienced trauma. Because something horrible has happened and created a huge change in our lives, and ignoring it wouldn’t make that go away. At this point, the only way out is through. But enough magical thinking.
 

MsZem

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16,755
The author of your article, which I read yesterday, is a hematologist-oncologist not an immunologist.He does indeed have many scholarly journal articles he wrote or co-wrote. Many of which questions current medical practices of many different diseases/standards. They are all behind paywalls so I can't read the content or studies he has written. The synopsis of his two books - can't really tell much about them from the 2 or more paragraphs. I also don't find any board certifications for either oncology, immunology or public health. He has an MPH (masters in public health). He is an associate professor at the University of California San Fransico Medical School. I find a lot about their Continuing Medical Education, but not much about the MD Program and graduation data.
Vinay Prasad is qualified to write something in the popular press about this question; an academic article looking at evidence for different practices would take more time and likely require collaboration with several co-authors. One can of course argue with his conclusions, but the graduation rates at UCSF (which to the best of my knowledge is a very good university for health sciences) or his current board certifications might not be the most relevant metric to base that on. But this piece includes some general criticism of his approach that may be warranted in this case as well.

As for what kids know and understand: of course many of them know and to some extent understand what is happening. Even kids who are not precocious see how adults around them are acting, are exposed to at least some media coverage, and hear things from other kids. Anyone who believes otherwise can reflect on whether they recall major news events from their childhood, whether it's the Cold War or the Challenger or 9/11 or something else. Children may not be aware of everything going on the world, but they do know a lot. This is why the adults in their lives are responsible for making sure that kids are getting the information and support to take things seriously and follow appropriate precautions (against school shootings, or terrorist attacks, or CV, or anything else), without burdening them with unnecessary details and anxiety. It's not always easy to do that, but I imagine the parents and educators here are all doing their best.
 

Lemonade20

If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.
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1,903
Humanity has never been more divided than ever. I know eventually we'll come out of this, but there's a steep uphill climb ahead with Delta. Our economy is also shaky with so many people choosing not to work in service anymore. We're also experiencing more devastating natural disasters from wildfires to hurricanes to flooding. It almost feels like there's no light at the end of the tunnel, but I know it's there and I hope to reach it soon.
 

FGRSK8

Toad whisperer.....
Messages
20,077
History does repeat itself.

The first 10 years of my life we had the scourge of Polio. Our parents would send off to camps during the summer that were almost totally isolated. Our parents were worried but they tried to let us kids live our lives as normal as possible. Some of my friends caught it and unfortunately, one did not make it. To add to the misery 1954 we had 3 hurricanes and in 1955 we had two which decimated the Northeast. It was a pretty hopeless time. Then the cure for polio was found and life became “normal”.

Here we are in 2021 and we have another scourge and all assorted disasters. However, things will get better. Like polio for which the got a cure and HIV for which now they have an effective treatment, the same will happen to this scourge. In the meantime, the dman thing will throw the Greek alphabit of variants at us, but it is just a matter of time before a more effective vaccine will be developed as well as effective treatments so that in this end, this scourge will be relegated to no more than a nuisance.

In the meantime, use common sense. Yes parents are worried but I think it is also necessary to give people as a normal existence as possible, tempered with common sense measures…
 
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allezfred

Lipinski Stole My Catchphrase
Staff member
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60,180
Since I know you were quite concerned about mental health, here’s some good news for you @Louis


Prof Arensman said the figures for last year belie the dire warnings from some that *********-19 restrictions and concerns would result in a surge in suicides.
The data also tallies with indications from coroners earlier this year that there would not be significant increases in suicides from last year before their courts.
 

Hedwig

WoolSilk Fanatic
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19,262
it is so hard to say - and we may never know the true extent of the costs we paid for ********* restrictions - nor how many lifes we saved.
one example - globally the amount of deaths among children (for any cause) has decreased by a lot. More hygiene maybe? Less stress for some?
But in the long run I think that in the long run over many years in the future, the ********* might cost the lives of more children because of halted vaccination programs and closed schools - maybe I am wrong and some illnesses that cost a lot of lifes normally over one year were eradicated with the measures from the ********* - but it is too early too tell.
And this is just one example - at the moment all numbers are sort of meaningless regarding death tolls and over mortality for instance. Yes, we see a higher mortality in many countries but not all cases are clear. And we would need to add deaths that were stopped these 18 months from trafic and from premature born babies (since there was a clear indicator that more babies were carried to term since more expecting mothers were not required to go to the office but worked from home - which might have been more stress on the other hand, especially if they had more children at home with home-schooling so this finding surprised me a lot).
I am sick to death of people just arguing in one direction and not acknowleding that there are costs and mistakes in every direction we could have taken and that all ********* measures were done with the best intention (saving lifes, not overwhelming the health system) but on the other hand that there WERE mistakes and overdone methods which still does not mean that everything was wrong, just that we as a society - had to decide what to do within days or weeks and mostly without knowing the whole picture at that moment (we still don't).
 

Louis

Private citizen
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16,198
Would you rather kids got sick and maybe died, or transmitted C19 to others who got sick and maybe died?

I don't want any child or anyone to die. But getting sick with C19 is a different story. Especially in countries of vaccinated people (or people who could easily choose to be vaccinated), it's not a big deal if kids get C19. Some scientists argue that it may be better if kids get C19 and "natural immunity." Just yesterday, the Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunization in the UK recommended that children NOT be vaccinated, as the benefits are marginal: https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-58445499. (There may yet be a political override of this scientific recommendation.)

If we've offered every adult vaccination, and if there is marginal benefit in vaccinating children, then why are we not back to normal life, accepting that we've done everything we can to make C19 a "normal" illness for most people?

We are not talking about an entire childhood here, just 1-2 years of a child's life.

"Just" 1-2 of the most formative years. I hope I look back on this thread in five years and laugh that I was so worried about my youngest niece, who was a happy, healthy, well-adjusted child doing well in school in March 2020 and is now the complete opposite.

Some people seem to think there’s a magical way we could have gotten out of this global health crisis unscathed.

Sweden. Different choices, different trade-offs, children and children's rights were more of a priority.

Since I know you were quite concerned about mental health, here’s some good news for you @Louis


That's excellent news. Although the "leading indicators" of suicide, e.g., calls to hotlines, have all risen, the statistics I've seen (from developed countries) all indicate that the suicide rate is not increasing. I've never been happier to be wrong.
Unfortunately, the data takes 1/2 a year or more and is very high level, so we don't know if suicide rates are increasing within certain vulnerable groups. And some surveys show that suicidal thoughts are increasing, which is also not great news.
We still have a mental health crisis, the effects of which will continue to last beyond the p@ndemic.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
8,490
One of the biggest impacts of the ********* is yet to be fully felt (just starting a bit to feel it).

The death and burnout of health care professionals.

The harsh working conditions plus down right abuse that they have experienced in the past 18 months is hard to comprehend.

The ones that are still alive are leaving the professions in droves to protect what is left of their mental health.

They are not easily replaced and it hurts us all when this happens.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,062
If we've offered every adult vaccination, and if there is marginal benefit in vaccinating children, then why are we not back to normal life, accepting that we've done everything we can to make C19 a "normal" illness for most people?

Well here in Germany (as probably in the US and in Switzerland and Austria) it's because every adult was offered a vaccine and not enough people took the offer, therefor there's too many severe cases landing in the hospitals/ICU beds and then all of them might be full and then when people have a car accident or heart attack, the hospitals might just have run out of beds, which would sort of suck for everybody. So your solution is?

Our head virologist said we're now failing our vaccination goals due to indifference. Many people are just not interested in getting vaccinated. They don't care to. They don't particularily care about the ********* either. They also obviously don't care about the consequences on children, health care workers, businesses, economy, ...which of course at least in Germany is related to the fact that most of the economy is actually doing well, so there's not many people affected. If one is honest, most Germans care mostly about whether their summer holiday or wedding or birthday party is not ruined by something *********-19 related. ********* is so 2020 :blah: ...Since usually our politicians react early enough to avoid catastrophies , I suppose we'll just slide through another winter without things getting as bad as in the US for example and then in 2022 everybody here will complain that the government really went so over the top because of this *********, inflicting all those terrible hardships on people without any reason.

That said I thind there's certainly a lot of bad consequences of restrictions even here, but as others have pointed out there's just no way to just ignore the illness as long as too many people get sick at the same time. That's a childish denial of reality.

I find it weird, that you are proteced of the ***** quite well, you're living in a country that supposedly has no real restrictions anymore and you're still so obsessed with restrictions or what's going on in other countries, that sure doesn't sound particularily healthy to me :huh: Are you stuck in your appartment with noisy neighbors again or what?
 
Messages
8,731
One of the biggest impacts of the ********* is yet to be fully felt (just starting a bit to feel it).

The death and burnout of health care professionals.

The harsh working conditions plus down right abuse that they have experienced in the past 18 months is hard to comprehend.

The ones that are still alive are leaving the professions in droves to protect what is left of their mental health.

They are not easily replaced and it hurts us all when this happens.
After the protests at hospitals this past week, I’m hearing a level of despair and also anger from my healthcare worker friends that is beyond what I’ve heard so far :(

My best friend is an LPN. She started nursing in April 2020. Every unit she’s worked on has had active outbreaks, she did nothing but work for weeks at a time. She burned herself out, her mental health became scarily bad, so she switched to giving vaccinations. Now though, it’s the people that don’t want to get vaccinated that are coming in. So she has insults and abuse hurled at her all day. She found a new job, now she’s evaluating and testing kids with c*vid. She’s a shell of the person she was before. She loves nursing in general, but it’s been a lot, and I’m really not sure how much more she can take. It’s not sustainable and she’s not unique.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,306
Yesterday, three schools in Vancouver, WA were targeted by the Proud Boys & the schools were forced to lockdown because the Neo-Nazis were threatening school staff for requiring masks and these guys were trying to force their way into at least one of the buildings to "escort" a child not wearing one. One guy had his arm on a child's shoulder, "praying" over her because she was trying to enter the building without a mask.

I woke up this morning with a nightmare.



Yesterday I read that Kentucky--which has a school mask mandate--has had to close over 20 school districts in these first few weeks of the school year:(.

My hopes that schools here might get through this year successfully are more on the rocks this week because local schools are not treating Delta as a new challenge, and I'm worried about the fallout over the next couple weeks.
 
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once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,849
I think that we won't be able to look at the lockdown or masking issues WITHOUT looking at other life circumstances that may or may not be because of the pan#demic.

When a child (or adult) loses a parent to say cancer or other conditions we know that children react in many ways - including losing socialization with peers who don't understand the level of grief, school work, isolating from others. If the surviving parent is unable because of their own grief to provide emotional support, the child may withdraw even further or may try to parent the parent. And changes in finances or concern over where they might have to live. Eating disorders may appear. We know that some anorexia issues have a control component, and some overeating has a feeling comfort. That's a lot to process no matter how a parent dies - cancer, trauma, or C-19.

Relatives might want to attribute these changes to outside factors but we are doing harm if we don't recognize that. People want something to blame, not recognizing all the complexities surrounding parental loss. Not everything is pan#demic created.

For whatever reason, we could blame Trump et all, masking and how we protect ourselves and our children/society was politcal from day 1. No one is going to emerge on the other side of the pan#demic unscathed. No one.

To be honest - I think we are all tired of this ***** and want normal whatever that was. It's just that some of our normal won't exist anymore. People we loved aren't here anymore, celebrations were/are missed, grieving didn't happen, so many things. It's just not going to be the same. But nothing stays the same even in "normal" times.

I hope I can refrain from saying anything more. Other than many times, ***** or no *****, life sucks.
 
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Elka

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,525
Tired of this "Sweden being the model of how to handle...." They did not do well, especially in the beginning, but let's not go that route.

You want to do like Sweden does? You must first start with the free healthcare for everyone. Then give all the workers sick with YKW fully paid sick leave for 2 weeks, no questions asked. I am pretty sure that gets a lot of sick people actually stay home and it helps together with effective vaccination. (They also did not travel to the eurofootball to StPetersburg like Finns and did not yet get that amount of delta, but that is minor).
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,849
I'm tired of this whole pan*demic. I'm tired of vaccine hesitation, I'm tired of vaccine politics, I'm especially tired of anti vaxxers.

I want politicians to quit pushing the just say no vaccines - because as Lindsay Graham found at his rally last weekend they boo his plea to get vaccinated - it is too late to try and change course

I have reached the end of my vaccine fatigue. I do not feel remorse in wanting unvaccined (not those who because of age or legitimate health issues, but everyone else who is not) to become ill/die of this horrible *****. And I don't feel remorse in saying they don't get treated either.

I am tired of them getting care while healthcare staff are totally burned out and will experience PTSD for the rest of their lives.

I want the unvacvinated to pay for the hospital bills of those who get the *****. And pay retribution to families who have lost family from this *****. I want the unvaccinated to have a mask taped on the faces (securely - no dick noses, no tugging down to speak, etc) until they are vaccinated.

I'm tired of them. I want my life back.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,849
@once_upon I couldn't have said it better myself.

I'm tired of how heartless this entire thing has made me. I feel like I have so little compassion for anyone.
Yep. I'm very heartless now and only have empathy with kids who can't get vaccinated at this point.

I try really hard to have some empathy, but it really has been killed. And that's what I'm hearing from my neighbors. We are all effing tired of people who won't get vaccinated
 

PRlady

Well-Known Member
Messages
37,630
I think about losing my parents almost a year ago. I’ll never blame the aide who infected them after eight months in lockdown- it was two months before vaccines were available.

But if my parents were alive and infected NOW by a home aide, I would be outraged. No one is so stupid as to misunderstand what every scientist is saying about the efficacy and safety of vaccines.

I just saw a stat that a fifth of US college students reported moderate or severe depression a year ago when they were in remote learning. That makes sense to me and it’s awful. But not as awful as an even higher death rate than we have already suffered.
 

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