The Race for the 2020 POTUS elections

Andora

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But I will say that saying “screw” any one group, yeah, right. :rolleyes: Including “progressives” who whine and moan that they weren’t catered to, so they’re gonna take their little voting football and go home, and we’ll show you.

Anyone not on the bus won’t have a seat at the table when the Dems finally win without them. Their choice. ;)
:confused: Educated white women are and have been reliable Democratic Party voters, a part of the Obama coalition. They don't need to be won back. How did they piss away their future? :confused:
I really struggle to feel that the "educated white woman" sect who left the democrat party and voted for Trump need to be catered to/won back. I'm sorry that's not a unifying sentiment, but... To me, they should have been smart enough to know better in 2016. If that particular voting bloc needs resources spent to win them back now still, well... I'm just not there yet, I guess. I fail to see how the Democrat party left them behind and Trump offered enough for their vote.

I think there is however no question that sexism is deeply imbedded in our society including in the minds of women and the hurdles that a Gillibrand, Harris, or Warren face are nearly insurmountable.

Its a walk in the park for a man like Beto, he faces none of what the women do.
Absolutely.

The discussion earlier about Bernie movement crushing Beto was interesting to me. I bristle at the mention of Bernie, but I think it's important Beto is seriously challenged if he wants the big title. I think it made Obama a better candidate, going against Hillary in 2008. And if O'Rourke can't stand up to the challenge, it's best to find out early.
 

BlueRidge

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I really struggle to feel that the "educated white woman" sect who left the democrat party and voted for Trump need to be catered to/won back. I'm sorry that's not a unifying sentiment, but... To me, they should have been smart enough to know better in 2016. If that particular voting bloc needs resources spent to win them back now still, well... I'm just not there yet, I guess. I fail to see how the Democrat party left them behind and Trump offered enough for their vote.
:confused: A majority of white college educated women voted for Hillary Clinton. I've never seen any analyses about the Democratic Party leaving behind white college educated women. :confused:

There is supposedly a chunk of Obama voters who were white males without college degrees who left the Democratic Party to vote for Trump and we hear endlessly how we should spend all our time winning them back but I've never heard anyone say we should cater in some new way to college educated white women, a majority of whom are staunch Democratic voters. (hint: for instance most of the people who post in PI ;) )

Where are you reading anything like this? Everything I've seen is about how Democrats need to beg and plead and ask for forgiveness from white male voters in those upper mid-western states. Its all about the downtrodden white male working class voters in everything I've seen.

BTW on the subject of Bernie Sanders, I don't want him to run for president, but I do call on everyone who can only think negatively about him to look at the leadership he (along with Chris Murphy) has provided in fighting to end US support for the hideous Saudi war in Yemen. He is absolutely heroic in pursuing this.
 

BlueRidge

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Bloomberg is a true believer in doing something about climate change.
And here he is today: “Any candidate for federal office better darn well have a plan to deal with the problem that the Trump science advisers say could, basically, end this world,” he said. “I can tell you one thing, I don’t know whether I’m going to run or not, but I will be out there demanding that anybody that’s running has a plan.”

I'd rather see Bloomberg use his influence on this as a non-candidate, he could be very powerful.

Bloomberg slams Trump on climate change (The Guardian)
 

Andora

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:confused: A majority of white college educated women voted for Hillary Clinton. I've never seen any analyses about the Democratic Party leaving behind white college educated women. :confused:

There is supposedly a chunk of Obama voters who were white males without college degrees who left the Democratic Party to vote for Trump and we hear endlessly how we should spend all our time winning them back but I've never heard anyone say we should cater in some new way to college educated white women, a majority of whom are staunch Democratic voters. (hint: for instance most of the people who post in PI ;) )

Where are you reading anything like this? Everything I've seen is about how Democrats need to beg and plead and ask for forgiveness from white male voters in those upper mid-western states. Its all about the downtrodden white male working class voters in everything I've seen.

BTW on the subject of Bernie Sanders, I don't want him to run for president, but I do call on everyone who can only think negatively about him to look at the leadership he (along with Chris Murphy) has provided in fighting to end US support for the hideous Saudi war in Yemen. He is absolutely heroic in pursuing this.
I clued in here and with Vash's response:

College educated (mostly white) women who voted for Trump. Get them back. Pennsylvania will follow. And a Bernie bro is not the way to do it.
I'm just not that interested in running candidates to cater to those who really did themselves a disservice, imho.
 

BlueRidge

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I clued in here and with Vash's response:



I'm just not that interested in running candidates to cater to those who really did themselves a disservice, imho.
Which candidates do you think are catering to people who did themselves a disservice? I'm still confused.

FACT: A majority of college educated white women voted for Hillary Clinton. Are you saying they did themselves a disservice by voting for Clinton? I'm confused still.

ETA: Also as far as winning more college educated white women goes: "In 2018, white college-educated women increased their support for Democratic candidates by eight percentage points over 2016."
 
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BittyBug

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I'd be ok with a centrist candidate if the Dems can keep the House and re-take the Senate or at least make inroads into reducing their deficit there since I believe that a centrist Democratic president would sign progressive legislation initiated by Congress.
 

jeffisjeff

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According to the 2016 exit polls (see www.cnn.com/election/2016/results/exit-polls), the only subgroup (when broken down by M/F and education) of whites that voted for Clinton was college-educated white women. Clinton only won 51% of college-educated white women, but that is significantly higher than among white women with no college (34% voted for Clinton), college-educated white men (39% voted for Clinton) and white men with no college (23% voted for Clinton).

So, I am not sure why we are busy blaming college-educated white women when there are lots of other white folks to blame for Trump's win. :p
 

BlueRidge

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I'd be ok with a centrist candidate if the Dems can keep the House and re-take the Senate or at least make inroads into reducing their deficit there since I believe that a centrist Democratic president would sign progressive legislation initiated by Congress.
Someone like Bloomberg could be a new FDR to a Green New Deal. maybe... All kinds of things are possible.

The one thing I'm not interested in is having left-leaning candidates ruled out by moderate ideologues who continually trumpet as truth the opinion that a left-leaning candidate can't win. We'll hear a lot of that and its not based on factual evidence; it is based on the sources preference for a more centrist candidate and their satisfaction with the status quo that existed before Trump.

We'll see who can get voters and funders and party leaders over the coming months. The candidates who can are the strongest candidates, obviously. If among those candidates are more left-leaning ones we will undoubtedly see a campaign from vested interests to get people to oppose those candidates because they are "too left" and certainly to play on left-over emotions from 2016 of Bernie vs Hillary as well. I just hope more voters will ignore that and evaluate candidates based on who each voter most prefers.
 

Vash01

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According to the 2016 exit polls (see www.cnn.com/election/2016/results/exit-polls), the only subgroup (when broken down by M/F and education) of whites that voted for Clinton was college-educated white women. Clinton only won 51% of college-educated white women, but that is significantly higher than among white women with no college (34% voted for Clinton), college-educated white men (39% voted for Clinton) and white men with no college (23% voted for Clinton).

So, I am not sure why we are busy blaming college-educated white women when there are lots of other white folks to blame for Trump's win. :p
True, but 51 seems like a pretty low number to me, considering how Trump had treated women during his campaign. Lots of room to improve.
 

BlueRidge

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One of the reasons we have such a divisive mess in this country is the slicing and dicing of the electorate that has become more and more prevalent with big data in campaigns.

We need candidates that can bridge differences not appeal to them.

We also do not need a vilification of the left. We need a campaign for the nomination that has multiple voices and we can't afford to have people try to shut down voices that they disagree with with all kinds of calumnies. Dems need the votes of left, progressive, liberal, moderate and centrists to win. I hope candidates are looking at how they can bridge the differences between these groups and bring them together for a strong general election campaign.
 
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olympic

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This is a 2020 thread, but before all that goes down, there are some interesting Governor's races next year (2019):

In KY, Republican incumbent Matt Bevin is one of the least popular governors in the country. He will draw a strong challenge (possibly, depends on the primary) from AG, Andy Beshear, who has waged major battles to fight the opioid crisis in his state.

In LA, Democrat John Bel Edwards defends his seat against a Republican challenger, but may have dodged a bullet when Republican U.S. Senator Kennedy passed on the opportunity to challenge him.

In MS, AG Jim Hood has thrown his hat in the ring. He is the highest profile Democrat and probably the best option for Democrats in that state.
 
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Buzz

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Just saw that Elizabeth Warren has made it official. I just don’t think her, Biden or sometimes Democrat Sanders is the way to go for the DNC. They need new young blood.
 

BlueRidge

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I don't know anyone who is enthusiastic about Warren for President. Granted that's a small particular sample, but where are her supporters?
 

attyfan

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Probably waiting to see who else jumps in. I think a lot of her supporters like what she stands for ... which is different from thinking she could be a winning candidate.
 

Andora

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Which candidates do you think are catering to people who did themselves a disservice? I'm still confused.

FACT: A majority of college educated white women voted for Hillary Clinton. Are you saying they did themselves a disservice by voting for Clinton? I'm confused still.

ETA: Also as far as winning more college educated white women goes: "In 2018, white college-educated women increased their support for Democratic candidates by eight percentage points over 2016."
I pointed out the posts I disagreed with, that educated white women needed to be won back. If they have been already, that's ideal. But forcing status quo in the centre (I guess that would be Bloomberg, Booker or O'Rourke now? Biden if that's a serious thing?) in order to get back Trump voters isn't my bag, personally. Maybe take it up with the posters who feel they need to be won back. I think that's a frustrating take.

I don't think a centrist is such a bad word if that's what actually represents a party, or keeping a presence. A centrist presence in the republican party would have been nice these last number of years, as the big tent party moved the posts. A centrist who is open to more progressive ideas-- maybe one who doesn't espouse things like free education because they can't see how it would work, but is open to seeing so? That would be ideal. A cousin of mine insists that's the kind of candidate Booker is.
 

BlueRidge

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I pointed out the posts I disagreed with, that educated white women needed to be won back. If they have been already, that's ideal. But forcing status quo in the centre (I guess that would be Bloomberg, Booker or O'Rourke now? Biden if that's a serious thing?) in order to get back Trump voters isn't my bag, personally. Maybe take it up with the posters who feel they need to be won back. I think that's a frustrating take.

I don't think a centrist is such a bad word if that's what actually represents a party, or keeping a presence. A centrist presence in the republican party would have been nice these last number of years, as the big tent party moved the posts. A centrist who is open to more progressive ideas-- maybe one who doesn't espouse things like free education because they can't see how it would work, but is open to seeing so? That would be ideal. A cousin of mine insists that's the kind of candidate Booker is.
Thanks for answering, my brain wasn't working yesterday and I was stuck on the idea that college educated white women are Trump voters when most aren't and so couldn't make sense of anything. :lol:

I'm opposed to any attempt to win Trump voters. Some of them will wander over of their own accord, but given that "trying" to win them means giving credence to Trumpian sentiments, just flat out no.

It is going to take someone able to speak to a broad range of people, from little old white people in PA who are scared by people like Ilhan Omar to young people who think that climate change is an emergency that can't be acted on by cozying up to corporate interests and a whole host of people, with widely varying opinions and emotions, in between.

Cory Booker from what I've read is someone who sees that so I'm interested in watching what he does.
 

Andora

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Thanks for answering, my brain wasn't working yesterday and I was stuck on the idea that college educated white women are Trump voters when most aren't and so couldn't make sense of anything. :lol:

I'm opposed to any attempt to win Trump voters. Some of them will wander over of their own accord, but given that "trying" to win them means giving credence to Trumpian sentiments, just flat out no.

It is going to take someone able to speak to a broad range of people, from little old white people in PA who are scared by people like Ilhan Omar to young people who think that climate change is an emergency that can't be acted on by cozying up to corporate interests and a whole host of people, with widely varying opinions and emotions, in between.

Cory Booker from what I've read is someone who sees that so I'm interested in watching what he does.
:)

I agree with you. Then, I often do.
 

DORISPULASKI

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....

BTW on the subject of Bernie Sanders, I don't want him to run for president, but I do call on everyone who can only think negatively about him to look at the leadership he (along with Chris Murphy) has provided in fighting to end US support for the hideous Saudi war in Yemen. He is absolutely heroic in pursuing this.

I got this from Sen. Chris Murphy this morning.

For a long time now, most winning Senate campaigns have pretty much folded up operations after Election Day. They let go of staff, organizers move on to their next state, digital infrastructure atrophies until the next campaign, and all those volunteers just wait around until the next “on year.”
That sounds silly to me.

So I decided to keep a bunch of staff on after our win. You’ve seen some of their work:
A few weeks ago, they produced a video, “Yemen, Explained,” that brought people up to speed on a war that was never authorized and few Americans really knew much about. It received hundreds of thousands of views before the Senate voted to end our involvement in the Saudi-led war that has led to the worst humanitarian catastrophe in the world today.

I was very proud of that fact.
But that’s not it all. My campaign team continues to organize on issues like gun safety, a progressive vision for America’s role in the world, and a massive voter contact operation in Connecticut capable of contacting hundreds of thousands of people in just a few days on just about any issue
I am glad to hear he is keeping his staff working on progressive issues, Yemen, and gun control. And perhaps he may be looking to 2020 and 2024...
 

BittyBug

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I agree with Warren on a number of policy issues but I don't think she's electable. And while many pundits have suggested that voters should first worry about who they like and then concern themselves with electability, assuming that the issue will resolve itself, I disagree. As @BlueRidge said, the candidate is going to have to straddle a fairly broad constituency that spans generations, socioeconomic groups and cultural differences. In particular, the candidate has to be able to mobilize people of color.

To me Warren is too academic. She's Harvard elite even though she grew up in OK, and she has too much baggage with her claim to native ancestry, to the point that she has managed to tick off various tribes with her DNA stunt. I just don't see her pulling in people on the fence.

I would like to see two Dem candidates team up early on to push a POTUS/VP concept. Everyone always waits to pick their VP candidate until they have the nomination, but I think teaming up now could be very powerful if the two candidates complement each other.

People I might be interested in seeing on a ticket: Joaquin Castro, Stacey Abrams, Eric Holder, Sherrod Brown, Brian Schatz (although he has said he won't run), Mazie Hirono (can she be a VP even though she is not US-born, or does the VP candidate have to be eligible to serve as POTUS?), and maybe Beto O'Rourke (but not as the lead candidate).
 

BlueRidge

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Pulling out a line from a Jennifer Rubin column on Warren:

Certainly, primary voters want to swoon over an articulate, charismatic figure, but more than anything, they want to win.
Now everyone be honest, when you think of people swooning over someone who is an "articulate charismatic figure who can win," isn't the person you picture automatically male, even if your feminist sensibilities cause you to claim otherwise?

Hillary Clinton lost for a host of reasons but the one most overlooked is that she was a woman and everything negative about her aggravated people's innate sexism. Ditto Warren. It will also be true of Gillibrand and Harris.

Let's not pretend there is a level playing field. I think we need to face this head on.
 

BlueRidge

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@BlueRidge I find Stacey Abrams to be very articulate and charismatic, so no, I don't automatically think male.
But do you really think that women candidates don't have a disadvantage because of sexism? And not just one of males who don't want to vote for a woman, but of implicit biases that are inherent in our society that we don't even always recognize immediately?
 

Andora

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But do you really think that women candidates don't have a disadvantage because of sexism? And not just one of males who don't want to vote for a woman, but of implicit biases that are inherent in our society that we don't even always recognize immediately?
If we're talking immediate reactions, I think you're 100% bang on. Obama is still who comes to mind as an ideal charismatic leader. Women have not crested that mountain yet - not even close.
 

BlueRidge

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If we're talking immediate reactions, I think you're 100% bang on. Obama is still who comes to mind as an ideal charismatic leader. Women have not crested that mountain yet - not even close.
I'm not really talking immediate reactions. I'm also talking "I just don't like Hillary Clinton" type long term lingering feelings as well.

I supported Obama in 2008 over Clinton but I'll say it right now, she lost to him because she was a woman (Remember it was very close, and in fact she arguably won more primary votes. I'm not saying that its a factor that is overwhelming. Its one that is devastatingly insidious.)
 

clairecloutier

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I was just perusing a "reaction" thread on Twitter about Warren's announcement: https://twitter.com/EdKrassen/status/1079750775646158848

The majority of comments seemed to indicate that people like Warren's policies and her positions on the issues. However, most do not think she is electable or the right candidate at this time.

Which pretty much echoes my personal views. If we can get the WH back, I think she'd be a fantastic policy advisor for a new Dem President or a top ally in the Senate. I do not think she is electable as President.
 

BittyBug

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But do you really think that women candidates don't have a disadvantage because of sexism? And not just one of males who don't want to vote for a woman, but of implicit biases that are inherent in our society that we don't even always recognize immediately?
Does sexism still exist in this country? Absolutely, 100% yes. And there is a profile of women who are inherently threatening to men that women like Clinton and Warren fit: they don't convey warmth and openness (which is not to say they have neither characteristic but they are both very guarded).

Now is every female candidate similarly disadvantaged? No. To me there is something about Abrams that is very safe. She just seems very approachable despite her Ivy law degree. She's personal, and I think people could imagine her being their mom or aunt or friendly neighbor. She's your grandmother who knew everything, not your imposing professor who knew everything.

People will gravitate to people they like. And I don't think that's necessarily a gender issue.
 

BlueRidge

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Well she's not running and it isn't likely to be. And I think Harris and Gillibrand will run into that intangible "not likable" factor which is something that can't be discounted when the goal has to be to win, but it is actually really vile and disgusting when it isn't something men have to deal with, if you ask me. I just am not willing to just accept it without comment.

I don't like Warren because of her uber-populist schtick (just got her "I'm running" letter in my email inbox). Its a total turnoff to me especially after reading her foreign policy speech. I do love many of her domestic policy proposals and hope she can at least get exposure to them that will advance them.
 

Vash01

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I like Warren's speeches (style, entertainment but no necessarily the contenr) but that's about it. I am not surprised by her announcement, it was long coming. She is very low my list, so i won't be voting for her during the primaries. Same for Bernie. I am just not an extreme person. I like centrist, moderate views.
 

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