The Medical Thread: Vaccine Search / Staying Healthy / Treatments Etc

acraven

Well-Known Member
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2,156
Good enough results from one of the US remdesivir trials that Dr. Fauci commented on them today and the FDA is reportedly getting ready to issue an emergency-use authorization for *********-19 patients. Duration of illness was reduced to a statistically significant degree when remdesivir was administered intravenously, as opposed to the control group. Death rate was lower for remdesivir recipients, but it appears that difference may not have been statistically significant (not clear from article).

CNN.com article: https://tinyurl.com/yb9yl8kq
 

once_upon

Well-Known Member
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17,330
I hope people (aka current potus) realize it's an IV drug to be used in a hospital with some of the sickest patients.
But it does seem to be promising, one study.
 

Impromptu

Sekret Custom Title
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2,117
I hope people (aka current potus) realize it's an IV drug to be used in a hospital with some of the sickest patients.
But it does seem to be promising, one study.

It looks like at least one of the ongoing trials is testing it in patients with milder cases. https://tinyurl.com/ycjgx728

And researchers are continuing to investigate other treatments - UMN has around 20 studies in various stages of readiness (most are not yet recruiting).
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
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23,424
Good enough results from one of the US remdesivir trials that Dr. Fauci commented on them today and the FDA is reportedly getting ready to issue an emergency-use authorization for *********-19 patients. Duration of illness was reduced to a statistically significant degree when remdesivir was administered intravenously, as opposed to the control group. Death rate was lower for remdesivir recipients, but it appears that difference may not have been statistically significant (not clear from article).

CNN.com article: https://tinyurl.com/yb9yl8kq

Interesting to compare to the results of the Chinese study which showed no effect on mortality (doesn’t seem like this one is either) but doesn’t appear to have looked at duration.

I’m interested to hear about side effects because the study in Wuhan reported a much higher rate of stopping the treatment due to side effects than the control, so it’ll be interesting to see whether that holds and what those side effects are.
 

acraven

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2,156
I think one of the news blurbs mentioned either liver or kidney issues, but they sounded fairly mild. I hope for more comprehensive information when they get results from all the participating test sites.
 

Miezekatze

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15,373
Apparently the results of the south Korean study that found people to be reinfecting with ********* a 2nd time was wrong due to testing failures: https://news.sky.com/story/********-scientists-conclude-people-cannot-be-infected-twice-11981721

And I read an interview today with the German hospital that treated the very first German patients that already fell ill 3 months ago and recovered fast after mild symptoms , he says they are monitored all the time and still have antibodies after the 3 months. Hopefully such patients can give a good idea of how long people usually stay immune.

But he also said that they still have people in intensive care that fell ill during skiing in Ischgl in early March, which are still in critical condition (including a young man who was in good health), which shows how long patients can need intensive care beds.

In terms of the general situation in Germany, I read last week that about 60% of intensive care beds in Germany are still free. And while there are not sooo many *********-19 patients in intensive care units in Germany, many of them do need to stay in intensive care for a very long time, which I guess is one of the main reasons why the situation gets so incredibly bad when the curve isn't flattened early enough, because once all beds are full, it takes ages until (m)any get free again.
 

hoptoad

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1,625
This seems like a promising line of inquiry. From NYT:
Could ‘Innate Immunology’ Save Us From the ********?
Researchers are testing whether decades-old vaccines for polio and tuberculosis could protect against infection.
By Melinda Wenner Moyer

It could certainly help on the margins if health are workers and others who can't maintain physical distancing could be provided even reduced susceptibility to the crud.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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38,693
So that's why I pretty much never get the flu? I was giving the live polio vaccine when I was a child. Or does that effect wear off? (The article wasn't clear on that one.)

The thing about live vaccines is that some people get the disease that they are to protect you for so I don't think I would want to take a live TB vaccine. Polio would be okay because I was vaccinated against that.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
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6,999
I’m wondering if the BCG vaccine for TB is one of the reasons why Thailand has had such a low death rate from C-19.

Everyone there gets vaccinated at birth with BCG.

I am following the studies. It’s very interesting.
 

Japanfan

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24,044
So that's why I pretty much never get the flu?

I pretty much never get sick. In the last twenty years, the worst illness I have experienced has been a bad cold with chills. I actually don't recall ever being really sick in my whole adult life.

Sometimes I think there might be something wrong with me in terms of having an over-active immune system. Seems that people should get sick every once and while.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
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38,693
Sometimes I think there might be something wrong with me in terms of having an over-active immune system.
An overactive immune system would cause you to be hypersensitive to things leading to allergies and other auto-immune diseases. Our bodies are supposed to fight off bad pathogens and leave the good ones alone so not getting sick means our bodies are working the way they are supposed.
 

Doggygirl

Going through FS withdrawal after GPF
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10,320
Due to our business, we are members of the local Chamber of Commerce. They have been doing a great job sending daily e-mail summaries of what is going on related to BB both medically and economically. The following invitation to a webinar by Argonne Labs was offered in yesterdays e-summary. It looks like it might be interesting related to the research and science around BB. There didn't seem to be any suggestion of geographic or other restriction when I signed up, so I thought I would post the invite here in case some folks are interested:

You are Invited to a Public Lecture
Be part of a virtual audience and learn about Argonne's Impact on the ****** during their OutLoud Lecture:

From the onset of the *****, Argonne National Laboratory has been tackling challenges the presents. Their leading scientists are using the Lab’s state-of-the-art facilities and collaborating with research teams from around the country to deliver analysis and share discoveries that are significantly contributing to the global war against *.
Hear firsthand from three of the Lab’s scientific leaders who are conducting critical research to develop treatments and a vaccine; using supercomputers to narrow down the potential treatments that can be tested in a lab; and creating epidemiological models that can inform civic leaders as they determine how and when to revise public health policies and interventions.
Featured speakers are:

  • Stephen K. Streiffer, Interim Deputy Laboratory Director for Science, Associate Laboratory Director for Photon Sciences, and Director of the Advanced Photon Source
  • Rick L. Stevens, Associate Laboratory Director for Computing, Environment and Life Sciences and Professor, Department of Computer Science at The University of Chicago
  • Charles M. "Chick" Macal, Argonne Distinguished Scientist & Social, Behavioral, and Decision Science Group Leader

Don't miss this opportunity to learn and ask questions of these scientific experts.
If you have questions about the OutLoud Lecture Series, please contact us at [email protected].
LECTURE DETAILS

Tuesday
May 19, 2020
7:00-8:15 p.m. (CDT)

Details for the online lecture will be provided upon registration. Click here to REGISTER
 

ballettmaus

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15,739
In HongKong, three antiviral drugs plus an immune system booster seem to have helped patients recover. https://tinyurl.com/y7aebnn8

Dr. Kwok-Yung Yuen at Hong Kong University and colleagues tested the HIV drug combination of ritonavir and lopanivir along with the general antiviral drug ribavirin and a multiple sclerosis drug called beta interferon.

Patients in the study all had mild to moderate symptoms and were treated within seven days of testing positive. Some doctors think treating patients earlier in the course of the infection might be better.

...

The patients who got the cocktail tested negative for ******** after seven days on average. Those who just got the HIV drugs were positive on average for 12 days, the team reported in the Lancet medical journal.
 

YukiNieve

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972
I think this is very well written article about where/how you are more likely to get XXX from a professor who specialize in immunology and infectious disease:

The Risks - Know Them - Avoid Them

you need to look at your environment and make judgments. How many people are here, how much airflow is there around me, and how long will I be in this environment. If you are in an open floorplan office, you really need critically assess the risk (volume, people, and airflow). If you are in a job that requires face-to-face talking or even worse, yelling, you need to assess the risk.

As she mentions here, one of the risky places is public restrooms. After the all passengers of the infamous cruise ship Diamond Princess disembarked, a Japanese research team tried to find where XXX were most often left and found. It was the bathroom floor of the rooms for those who were infected by XXX.
 

annie720

Well-Known Member
Messages
902
I think this is very well written article about where/how you are more likely to get XXX from a professor who specialize in immunology and infectious disease:

The Risks - Know Them - Avoid Them
I read this yesterday when it was posted by a local small business that has recently reopened and is trying to stay informed on the best practices for keeping customers safe. Very interesting read and I can't stop thinking about some of thing things mentioned.
 

hoptoad

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1,625
This article was also posted in the News and Experiences thread:

Can someone help me understand the closing quote from a doctor?
One challenge to therapies for *********-19, Pascual said, is that the havoc caused by the ***** seems to last a long time — in some patients two, three or even six weeks. Critically ill patients may need many different treatments in that period to stay alive — blood pressure medications for the heart, dialysis for their kidneys, ventilators for breathing. If they can be kept stable for that length of time until doctors can remove the support of machines, he said, more patients just might have a chance.

“The reassuring thing is this *****, like others, eventually burns out,” Pascual said. “In the end, it’s a waiting game.”
Usually I hear the phrases "burns itself out" in regard to populations where the ***** runs out of hosts. I'm not sure what it means in an individual patient.

He seems to be saying that if we can keep the symptoms from killing the patient the ***** will eventually "just disappear."

Is this just a throwaway line at the end, or does he mean something more medically specific? Is there a normal progression with viruses where (aside from killing the host) they can't survive any more in that host? Is this really reassuring at all?
 

rosewood

MTT Meter= 177
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6,179
I will take Avigan if it's within 5 days from the appearance of symptoms.
 
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KCC

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2,062
I wish there were advances in creating highly effective (and comfortable) PPE along with the treatments & vaccines. I know it can be hard to find even the simplest masks right now for the masses, but hopefully some company is designing PPE now for essential workers if/when this kind of thing happens again. Maybe we wouldn't have to shut everything down each time a new ********* happens.
 

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
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24,184
This article came up when I went into a Chemical Database at work. It talks about Vitamin D deficiency and how there was a correlation between those with low Vitamin D levels and how they were impacted by the *****. Suggesting taking Vitamin D could assist in how severely impacted you might be by the *****.

 

Orm Irian

Well-Known Member
Messages
957
A prospective vaccine in Phase 1 trials on patients in Wuhan, China has shown some initial positive results - it's safe and produces neutralising antibodies and an increase in t-cells, with the only reported side effects so far being pain at the injection site, headaches, fever and fatigue (all mild to moderate). The initial trial was small and more work is needed to ensure the results are replicable, but a Phase 2 study has already begun in Wuhan and trials will begin at Dalhousie University in Canada soon.
 

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