The Medical Thread: Vaccine Search / Staying Healthy / Treatments Etc

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
4,713
Speaking of tetanus (and MMR), has the immunization schedule changed for kids from the 80s/90s? I had my final dose of DTP right before kindergarten (as did everyone else my age), and then a booster 10 years later (going into 10th grade) was required. Our second doses of MMR were done prior to start of 6th grade.

I don’t have kids, but I’ve picked up on this vague sense that those boosters are given at different ages now than they were when I was growing up.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
21,793
Speaking of tetanus (and MMR), has the immunization schedule changed for kids from the 80s/90s? I had my final dose of DTP right before kindergarten (as did everyone else my age), and then a booster 10 years later (going into 10th grade) was required. Our second doses of MMR were done prior to start of 6th grade.

I don’t have kids, but I’ve picked up on this vague sense that those boosters are given at different ages now than they were when I was growing up.
The current recommendation for MMR booster is around age 5.

I dont know and am only guessing but I imagine we will discover another one will be needed at sometime. I was a practicing nurse during the time we discovered the warning immunity (around 1984ish?)
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
48,794
The goal is to make sure the vaccines that are approved do no harm,
And with millions upon millions of people taking them, the FDA, CDC and other health organizations in other countries studying them, with the first people to have got them gotten them over a year ago (trial participants), I think it's pretty clear that the currently approved vaccines are safe. There is no need to wait 10 years for that kind of information.
 

Debbie S

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,761
The current recommendation for MMR booster is around age 5.

I dont know and am only guessing but I imagine we will discover another one will be needed at sometime. I was a practicing nurse during the time we discovered the warning immunity (around 1984ish?)
My age cohort (born early 70s), got the MMR at around 15 months. Then when we were in high school (so late 80s), people our age started getting measles, particularly after int'l trips. I think the explanation was that we got the vax too early for enough antibodies to be created, hence the change to a booster later in childhood.

When I went to college in 1990, we had to have a second MMR, given in the past 10 years, so I got one then. When I worked at a hospital (non-clinical), we had to be tested for immunity and if not, get another vaccine. I haven't heard anything about the need for another booster in adulthood, unless you didn't have an earlier one.

DPT vaccines were given several times to my age group during infancy/toddler years, then I think I had a booster at age 6, then another at 13. Started the adult versions at 18 before I went to college. My last one was the TDap, which I think was the first pertussis one I had since around 18 mos. Now I get to look forward to shingles and pneumonia vaccines, yippee....
 

love_skate2011

Banned Member
Messages
3,608
I have worked in retail & customer service for many years. I'm exposed to the public, and so I get a flu shot to reduce the risk that I will get sick, and reduce the risk that I will pass that on to someone else. Annual flu shots are the recommendation of Health Canada.

Flu shots don't wear off, and pharmacies don't make a lot of money off of flu shots. In Ontario they are provided by the government for everyone.

That's just nonsense.

Taking antibiotics, and being vaccinated are very different, and the affect on the body is completely different.

The ********* vaccines haven't even been around a year now, so how have you been taking it for 2 years now.

Everyone is tired of this, and it's understandable, but this is our reality right now & we have to find a way to get through each day.
Covid had been detected as early as September 2019.

No, the majority will not accept a lifetime of this, If co**** vaccine becomes a yearly inoculation.

I work in a structural firm, the opinion in other fields from Engineers to Project Managers is a NO.
Maybe people with pre existing conditions or people frequent to the clinics may not mind it
or those working in the medical field.

The most common concerns are impotency, long term side effects, ethics and being singled out for lack of choices.

This is coming from me who got the vaccines, very individualist and does not conform to a herd mentality.
not a conspiracy theorist just real long term concerns.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
21,793
My age cohort (born early 70s), got the MMR at around 15 months. Then when we were in high school (so late 80s), people our age started getting measles, particularly after int'l trips. I think the explanation was that we got the vax too early for enough antibodies to be created, hence the change to a booster later in childhood.

When I went to college in 1990, we had to have a second MMR, given in the past 10 years, so I got one then. When I worked at a hospital (non-clinical), we had to be tested for immunity and if not, get another vaccine. I haven't heard anything about the need for another booster in adulthood, unless you didn't have an earlier one.

DPT vaccines were given several times to my age group during infancy/toddler years, then I think I had a booster at age 6, then another at 13. Started the adult versions at 18 before I went to college. My last one was the TDap, which I think was the first pertussis one I had since around 18 mos. Now I get to look forward to shingles and pneumonia vaccines, yippee....
I didn't say we will/are. Just give the experience from the 90's, and the previous length of time pre that regarding booster, my personal guess is that we might need something. Just my guess on that one.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
48,794
I had measles and still have the antibodies so that is a case where the disease gives better immunity than the vaccine. I find it interesting that some vaccines wane and some do not (never had to get a polio booster, for example). I assume this has more to do with the disease type than the vaccine type but maybe it's a factor of both.
 

flyingsit

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,323
The most common concerns are impotency, long term side effects, ethics and being singled out for lack of choices.
There are zero cases of long-term side effects from any vaccine. Side effects are typically seen within days, not long after vaccines are given. Do they think Pfizer engineered the vaccine to cause impotency, in order to increase sales of Viagra?
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
17,032
There are zero cases of long-term side effects from any vaccine.

Do you mean approved C19 vaccines or any vaccines? The latter is definitely not true. We can make the case that C19 vaccines are safe without rewriting history.
 

love_skate2011

Banned Member
Messages
3,608
There are zero cases of long-term side effects from any vaccine. Side effects are typically seen within days, not long after vaccines are given. Do they think Pfizer engineered the vaccine to cause impotency, in order to increase sales of Viagra?
how many years have studies been conducted ? some side effects takes years for the right number of affected people to be included in studies. Vaccine may be reformulated as co*** will never go away, it is here to stay and will just mutate.

Eventually people will be fed up especially with government mandates and restrictions.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,444
The


The goal is to make sure the vaccines that are approved do no harm, but I have a file full of papers about trials with candidate vaccines in which things went very wrong. If a vaccine triggers or skews the wrong type of immune response, you can end up with a situation where the vaccinates fare worse than the unvaccinated controls.

ADE (antibody-dependent enhancement) is a very real thing that can happen.

love_skate2011 was questioning yearly flu shots, certainly if there were doubts about whether yearly flu shots make sense, some recommendation would have changed by now, since this is done routinely for years.

love_skate2011s idea of getting a flu shot only in years when there's a really bad wave is idiotic, since when you know that there's a big flu wave you're obviously already in the middle of it - unprotected (and it might have happened cause the vaccine doesn't work well or too little people got it). The whole point of vaccines is to avoid as many people as possible getting sick in the first place, not wait until so many people are already sick that YOU feel an imminent threat.

And with the way people are behaving regarding Covid-19 vaccines, I'm sure we'd still not be rid of Polio if people back then behaved the same or were allowed to :scream:
 

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
4,713
I didn't say we will/are. Just give the experience from the 90's, and the previous length of time pre that regarding booster, my personal guess is that we might need something. Just my guess on that one.
I know they found that one dose of the current MMR (used since 78, I think) protection from measles was 93%. A second dose improved that to 97%.

People born in, I think 57, or early are presumed to have had measles and had immunity. People who received the live polio vaccine in the 60s are considered immune, but people who received the killed vaccine from the 60s should get titers checked or a booster with the current vaccine if they haven’t already. Then there’s some other recommendation for the cohort from the 70s who didn’t have two doses 1980 or later.

I think the MMR is less waning immunity and more, for those born after 57, which vaccine did you have when and how many doses. (I was just curious if they’d changed the second dose from the tween years to earlier because it seemed like kids are now getting different vaccines at different ages).
 
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jeffisjeff

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,478
The most common concerns are impotency, long term side effects, ethics and being singled out for lack of choices.
I have all kinds of "concerns" in my life, quite a few of which are not rational, particularly those involving rabid bats, giant spiders and missed airplanes.

Anyway, it is amazing how willing some folks are these days to display their stupidity in all its glory. :lol:
 

love_skate2011

Banned Member
Messages
3,608
love_skate2011 was questioning yearly flu shots, certainly if there were doubts about whether yearly flu shots make sense, some recommendation would have changed by now, since this is done routinely for years.

love_skate2011s idea of getting a flu shot only in years when there's a really bad wave is idiotic, since when you know that there's a big flu wave you're obviously already in the middle of it - unprotected (and it might have happened cause the vaccine doesn't work well or too little people got it). The whole point of vaccines is to avoid as many people as possible getting sick in the first place, not wait until so many people are already sick that YOU feel an imminent threat.

And with the way people are behaving regarding *********-19 vaccines, I'm sure we'd still not be rid of Polio if people back then behaved the same or were allowed to :scream:
I've had my frequent doctor since I was in college, he told me getting flu shot yearly if you are not triggered by allergies is not best practice.

Polio didn't need yearly inoculations, The Co** Vaccine now were are in the booster phase, and then what ?
C*** is mutating, it has spread to the whole world, eradictaing it is impossible now. But you think all people will just follow with wall to wall media and government mandates that we'll get yearly of these forever ?

A breaking point will happen. I've had these conversation with my colleagues
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,444
What does being "triggered by allergies" have to do with the flu or flu shots?

Your doctor doesn't sound as if he's following common recommendations on the flu vaccines, at least none that I've ever heard of.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
48,794
I've had my frequent doctor since I was in college, he told me getting flu shot yearly if you are not triggered by allergies is not best practice.

Polio didn't need yearly inoculations,
Your doctor isn't following best practices in any country I know of. Not all countries recommend flu vaccines for everyone but none of them say that only people with allergies should get them.

And polio doesn't need yearly inoculations because it's not a cor0navirus; it's a poliovirus. Coronaviruses mutate and are respiratory viruses. So, yes, like the flu shot, we'll need them periodically, probably yearly. This has been known from the start before there even were any vaccines developed. It's the nature of this v1rus.

The prediction is that we'll get them as part of our yearly flu vaccination. That would be very convenient.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,882
********* had been detected as early as September 2019.

No, the majority will not accept a lifetime of this, If co**** vaccine becomes a yearly inoculation.

I work in a structural firm, the opinion in other fields from Engineers to Project Managers is a NO.
Maybe people with pre existing conditions or people frequent to the clinics may not mind it
or those working in the medical field.

The most common concerns are impotency, long term side effects, ethics and being singled out for lack of choices.

This is coming from me who got the vaccines, very individualist and does not conform to a herd mentality.
not a conspiracy theorist just real long term concerns.
The next time you speak to the Engineers and Project Managers, ask them their political affiliation.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
48,794
If they are concerned about impotency, they are listening to conspiracy nutjobs and not scientists. As for ethics, I think refusing vaccines is unethical myself.

People accept yearly flu vaccines just fine. If you time it right, you can get it as part of your annual physical. So it's not even inconvenient. Large companies have flu clinics right on site to make it even easier. There is no reason for the CV vaccine to be any different.
Homeopathic? Only thing I can think of
Also chiropractor.
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
17,032
People accept yearly flu vaccines just fine. If you time it right, you can get it as part of your annual physical. So it's not even inconvenient. Large companies have flu clinics right on site to make it even easier. There is no reason for the CV vaccine to be any different.

This is an American view of the world. Much (most?) of the rest of the world doesn't have annual physicals and couldn't get an annual physical even if they wanted. Plenty of evidence shows that they have little to no benefit, other than to insurance companies.

And people do not accept yearly flu vaccines. I've not heard of them being required outside of medical settings to go to work, and the OP is quite right that many countries do not offer them as a matter of practice except to the elderly or immunocompromised*. Like annual physicals, they don't pass a cost-benefit analysis for most public health systems, but insurance companies love them. *It seems to me that the OP may not be a native English speaker and may have meant immunocompromised instead of allergies?

I don't want a yearly C19 shot, at least not without clear and conclusive scientific evidence that it's necessary. Requiring continuous boosters seems to be a great way to push people to the anti-vaxx movement. I do not get a flu shot, by my own choice, as flu shots typically make me very sick for 1-2 days, and I do not feel I am at significant risk for hospitalization or death from influenza. I am willing to accept that risk, and for 20+ years of working for companies big and small, no one ever required me to get one or restricted my freedoms because I chose not to get it. Since I moved from the U.S., I've never even been encouraged to get a flu shot by any medical professional, and in fact my UK doctor discouraged me from getting one.
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,192
I've had my frequent doctor since I was in college, he told me getting flu shot yearly if you are not triggered by allergies is not best practice.

Polio didn't need yearly inoculations, The Co** Vaccine now were are in the booster phase, and then what ?
C*** is mutating, it has spread to the whole world, eradictaing it is impossible now. But you think all people will just follow with wall to wall media and government mandates that we'll get yearly of these forever ?

A breaking point will happen. I've had these conversation with my colleagues
I call people like you ... freaky people.
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,192
In Ontario we get free flu shots and babies as young as 6 and up can receive it too. Not sure if the rest of the provinces pay or not. Physicals are always strongly recommended as it can help spot or prevent issues with your health (obviously). It definitely saved my dad's life when he was much younger.

I have taken the flu shot for well over 30 years at least. i have absolutely no problem with vaccines and will receive another Covid shot when they figure it out. I know people who avoid doctors but that will unfortunately catch up with them.
 

becca

Well-Known Member
Messages
21,307
I don’t know I do think we need to seem some data about boosters because we don’t know fully the long Term effects and there is ADE that could possibly develop/

I will see you what happens in the next few months but I think there is a balance between the nut job anti vacciners and legitimate concerns.

To be quite frank since I am vaccinated I am not even sure getting covid would be the worst thing in the world for me because I might get more lasting immunity. I am not actively seeking it but I am also living my life now
 

Judy

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,192
I don’t know I do think we need to seem some data about boosters because we don’t know fully the long Term effects and there is ADE that could possibly develop/

I will see you what happens in the next few months but I think there is a balance between the nut job anti vacciners and legitimate concerns.

To be quite frank since I am vaccinated I am not even sure getting ********* would be the worst thing in the world for me because I might get more lasting immunity. I am not actively seeking it but I am also living my life now
The immunity from getting Covid is not long lasting and the vaccines provide much higher protection.

I have enough medical people in my family to respect that Covid can be a very dangerous virus.

I have only three months into my second shot but if you are concerned talk to your dr. not social media or people that buy into the paranoia.

In Canada boosters are available by a certain group that are most vulnerable ... it is not for the general public.
 

sk8pics

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,727
getting flu shots yearly means your natural immunity is already compromised.
This is not true.
I've had my frequent doctor since I was in college, he told me getting flu shot yearly if you are not triggered by allergies is not best practice.
What’s a frequent doctor? And where did he or she go to medical school?
A breaking point will happen. I've had these conversation with my colleagues
So what? Your colleagues have opinions like everyone. Why are you so sure they’re right? Just because that’s what you think?

I have gotten an annual flu shot for many years. For a long time, it was available to us at work. And then as a hospital volunteer I was able to get it there. All free. I’m signed up to get my flu shot next week; I don’t want to wait and hope that Moderna comes up with a combo booster/flu shot in the next couple of weeks. But I’ll certainly get a Moderna booster when/if it’s available. My doctor told me most emphatically to do that given my past history of blood clots.
 

Debdelilah2

Member
Messages
33
This is an American view of the world. Much (most?) of the rest of the world doesn't have annual physicals and couldn't get an annual physical even if they wanted. Plenty of evidence shows that they have little to no benefit, other than to insurance companies.

And people do not accept yearly flu vaccines. I've not heard of them being required outside of medical settings to go to work, and the OP is quite right that many countries do not offer them as a matter of practice except to the elderly or immunocompromised*. Like annual physicals, they don't pass a cost-benefit analysis for most public health systems, but insurance companies love them. *It seems to me that the OP may not be a native English speaker and may have meant immunocompromised instead of allergies?

I don't want a yearly C19 shot, at least not without clear and conclusive scientific evidence that it's necessary. Requiring continuous boosters seems to be a great way to push people to the anti-vaxx movement. I do not get a flu shot, by my own choice, as flu shots typically make me very sick for 1-2 days, and I do not feel I am at significant risk for hospitalization or death from influenza. I am willing to accept that risk, and for 20+ years of working for companies big and small, no one ever required me to get one or restricted my freedoms because I chose not to get it. Since I moved from the U.S., I've never even been encouraged to get a flu shot by any medical professional, and in fact my UK doctor discouraged me from getting one.
“Most adults can have the flu vaccine, but you should avoid it if you have had a serious allergic reaction to a flu vaccine in the past.”
Above is a quote from the UK’s site. You have a point, that they seem to recommend it for at risk groups (people over 50, healthcare workers, etc.) more so than the general public. However, living in the US and having mine every year, I never had any side effects besides a slight soreness at the injection site. They asked me whether I had ever had an adverse reaction to it when I went in a few days ago. Makes me wonder how common adverse reactions are. But I feel like a lot of people get them every year in the US; it’s one of the relatively few things I use my healthcare plan for. A 60 plus year old colleague of mine got his for the first time in his life this year because his doctor recommended it; no problem. I wouldn’t get it if I knew I’d have significant side effects though- they showed a list of possible ones, including fever, before I signed my consent. I didn’t feel like it was pushed on me; in fact the info sheet warnings would have made me think twice if I hadn’t already had it many times. Anyway, I’m glad the flu, the one that drains people’s energy for weeks with high fever, doesn’t seem to circulate that much. I was always catching the office cold before COVID; if influenza circulated back then I could have caught it too.
 

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