The Medical Thread: Vaccine Search / Staying Healthy / Treatments Etc

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,006
Part of getting issues resolved meant being able to produce in large numbers. They have worked out the manufacturing issues and have their qc assays validated.

They’re finalizing submission packages to regulatory agencies (and it will be available in the western world—fda has said they want this vaccine available here for the people who want it).

And you expect that happening before let's say March 2022 ?

Considering the wave timing in Germany last year, I expect most unvaccinated people will be infected until December anyway.
 

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
3,070
I wasn't too impressed with the clinical tesearch trial subject pool.
Really? Because they’ve tested on the most diverse population out of anyone and everyone I know who works in vaccine immunology thinks they did a better job than anyone else with their study design.

It’s also the only candidate in non-human primate studies that was able to completely stop viral replication in the respiratory tract, which is what we have to have in a vaccine if we really want to stop this. It has higher efficacy than Pfizer and Moderna against the original version of crud, better performance against variants, far fewer adverse events, etc.
 

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
3,070
And you expect that happening before let's say March 2022 ?

Considering the wave timing in Germany last year, I expect most unvaccinated people will be infected until December anyway.
Yes. Submissions are coming soon—the next several weeks kind of soon. There have been a lot of big orders places in Europe (the European plants are in England, Spain, and the Czech Republic off the top of my head) in the past couple of weeks (because the EMA approval is very near).

Edit: Some of the submissions are supposedly going to include usage as a booster for people previously vaccinated with something else. I don’t know which specific places though.
 
Last edited:

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,164
Really? Because they’ve tested on the most diverse population out of anyone and everyone I know who works in vaccine immunology thinks they did a better job than anyone else with their study design.

It’s also the only candidate in non-human primate studies that was able to completely stop viral replication in the respiratory tract, which is what we have to have in a vaccine if we really want to stop this. It has higher efficacy than Pfizer and Moderna against the original version of crud, better performance against variants, far fewer adverse events, etc.
As I understand it, some participants were unblinded in order to be allowed to travel within the EU? Doesn't that negate or put in question some results when study protocols are not carried out in accordance to the research standards?
 

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
3,070
As I understand it, some participants were unblinded in order to be allowed to travel within the EU? Doesn't that negate or put in question some results when study protocols are not carried out in accordance to the research standards?
You account for having to drop subjects when designing your trial. No one would ever assume that every last subject enrolled in a trial would complete it through the end. We don’t even assume we’ll be able to use all of the animals we start with in animal studies. You design these studies with more initial test subjects than you need because things happen and you give yourself a buffer to have subjects drop without using statistical power.

There were some people who tried to unblind themselves by taking commercial antibody tests and then leaving the trial to get vaccinated with something else in order to travel.

Novavax’s trials also included a blinded crossover component. Everyone got an initial set of shots and were followed. Once they had the safety and efficacy data showing the vaccine met the thresholds needed for emergency approval, everyone got a second set of shots opposite the ones they got the first time. So they make it so everyone who participated is ultimately vaccinated once they know the vaccine works.

There has never been a question about is Novavax’s study design and data analysis. They have been praised for doing a better job than the big guys when it comes to this aspect of things.
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,326
@MsZem that article is hysterical including the quotes from the ER Dr. Stop taking the joy out of it. :lol:
Well, if we treat it as something from The Onion I suppose it's harmless. But really, WTF is Rolling Stone doing these days?

Anyway, I propose a challenge to keep us entertained: come up with a fake trend story about anti-vaxxers' next move!
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,326
Apparently, the next thing is consuming betadine.
Er, yes, this is what the clickbait article we were discussing claims - with little proof. But surely we can come up with something more original?

(Although people could end up taking it seriously, and then FSU would be responsible for anti-vaxxers drinking their own urine or bathing in goat milk or god knows what else.)
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,326
I think they already went through that one.

Drinking one's own urine is a very common suggestion in the alternative "health" community.
As a CV treatment, though?

I know about vitamin D as a supposed cure/protective measure, but haven't yet seen urine suggested.
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
Messages
25,229
I think the next CV treatment should be... running around your house and flapping your arms like a chicken.

For the record, there are people who had to be unblinded in all vaccine trials due to vaccine requirements at their workplace or the fact that they became eligible for another vaccine. This is a normal course of the trial.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,006
Just in the German news that our national health agency has discovered that there's a lot more breakthrough infections among people who got Janssen/J&J than among those who got the other vaccines. Not surprising.

I'm a bit annoyed that different (EU) countries don't share their scientic findings more among each other.

Not everybody uses an international figure skating board for all the latest ********* news and developments from all over the world :shuffle:
:lol:

I think one of the main disadvantages from Jansson here in Germany is that according to a virologist the antibody response is said to build up very slowly over the course of several months. But J&J is often chosen here by people who don't actually really want to get a vaccine, but just the advantages of being vaccinated, because only one shot is needed. So then young people get it, so that they can to nightclubs or other events directly after 2 weeks. But I suppose the antibody response after 2 weeks is pretty lame. That already didn't work in the Netherlands. IMO giving fully vaccinated status to people who got the weakest vaccines 2 weeks after one shot, was not the most clever idea. On the other hand many people who took J&J maybe wouldn't have taken another vaccine at all and I guess a weaker protection is still better than no protection. And probably younger people who took Janssen and got a breakthrough infection will probably have improved their protection like that too.
 
Last edited:

aka_gerbil

Rooting for the Underdogs
Messages
3,070
I really would like to see some data on what happens when people get two doses of J&J because I have a suspicion that the numbers would be on par with the other two-dose vaccines.

On Monday, there were two papers published in Lancet Infectious Diseases on phase 2 data from J&J’s phase 2 studies on their Ebola vaccine. It’s adenoviral vector like their one for YNW, but it’s a two-dose series with the doses 8 weeks apart. There was still a strong immune response two years post second vaccination. The results from kids over 1 and under 18 was also great. Ebola zaire kills 90% of people who don’t get proper medical treatment and even with, your odds of surviving are only 50% (unless you get the regeneron monoclonal antibody treatment early, and then you have an over 90% chance of surviving).

Anyway, seeing the Ebola data with two shots made me curious to see YNW data from them in people who have had two doses.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
8,134
Pretty sure J&J are doing a clinical trial right now for 2 doses.

Someone correct me if I’m wrong…
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,326

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,006
The German article mentioned that theres a trial for 2 doses, but with the speed that seems to be going, evetybody will probably have gotten a mnra booster by then.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
42,674
I think one of the main disadvantages from Jansson here in Germany is that according to a virologist the antibody response is said to build up very slowly over the course of several months.
Something that has perplexed me is that originally I was reading that you were considered fully protected if you got J&J one month after your shot. Now they say 2 weeks. I think they did that just to make is simpler -- two weeks for every vaccine. It's not a good idea IMO.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,351
As of the moment, Moderna seems to be most successful in keeping people out of the hospital.

(CNN)A head-to-head study of all three authorized ******** vaccines in the United States finds the Moderna vaccine is slightly more effective than Pfizer's in real-life use in keeping people out of the hospital, and Johnson & Johnson's Janssen vaccine comes in third, but still provides 71% protection.

Pfizer's vaccine provided 88% protection against hospitalization, and Moderna's was 93% effective.

 

Hedwig

WoolSilk Fanatic
Messages
18,990
Every day I look to see ifBiontech Pfizer have applied for children vaccinations 5-11.
Any insider information about this apart from probably this month?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top
Do Not Sell My Personal Information