The Climate Emergency

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
17,600
Something that I have lately become more conscious of seeing are people who start their car and then either head back inside to get ready (if it's in winter and in the morning) or they start it and run another errand and drop something off and chat or whatever. In any case, the car is iddling for 5+ minutes and no one seems to care.

I've recently wondered why. I'm under the impression that people in Germany are more conscious of it and more likely to turn off the engine. So, do people in the US not to it because gas usually is cheap and they don't care or because there has been no campaign explaining to people that they can save money and do something good for the environment?
The curious thing is that some of the people that I see are environmental-conscious, so it's puzzling that they would leave their car iddling for minutes on end. n
 

DORISPULASKI

Watching submarine races
Messages
13,194
Not everybody has a garage.

If it is very cold out, your cold windshield may frost back over while you are driving, unless the air out of the defrost has warmed up first-which requires the engine to be running for a bit.

Otherwise, in the olden days, you had to let the engine oil warm up. Cars are designed differently nowadays, but a lot of people learned the old way and keep doing it.

I also might warm the car up if I were transporting a very young child or an elderly person.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
49,929
And in the temperate parts of the US, pre-conditioning (warming up the inside of the car) is pretty rare. Sometimes people do it to cool down the car before getting in if it's particularly warm outside.

My car has a pre-condition button I can press on the keyfob. And an app to start it. I have had this car for 4 years and I have never used it. And probably never will. (Also, the pre-conditioning uses the battery, not the gas engine.)
 

Andora

Skating season ends as baseball season begins
Messages
11,679
The weather is crazily hot for June here in France.
My student in Bordeaux just told me that it is 40c there and will be 42c tomorrow! 🤯🔥
Europe heatwave: Outdoor events banned in parts of France

Hot days happen - yesterday was "feels like 40C" while today it's much more reasonable after a storm came through. We'll have those days tempered by unseasonable chill as well.

The dramatic temperature swings, though, within a day/week, certainly are concerning.

Water cuts coming in the West as water levels fall in Lake Mead and Lake Powell:

From the article:
“It’s frankly a direct result of the lack of action on climate that we have seen for more than 20 years,” Heinrich said.

....


Patrick O’Toole, president of the Family Farm Alliance, expressed concerns about what could happen if water is taken away from agriculture, including the potential for harming rural communities and food production.

Entsminger said he agrees that the country needs to prioritize food security, but the fact remains that the water supply and demand are out of balance.

“We can’t balance the structural deficit by evacuating cities. So we’re going to need to make our ability to grow the same amount of food with less water a priority,” Entsminger said. “Every user in every sector needs to be planning for how they’re going to take care of their share of the pain.”

I wonder how long it'll be before another idiot senator from a desert state suggests the Great Lake states "share" their water. Article is from 2007, cites a dumb democrat, so it's not a partisan stupid suggestion.

But this is what happens when massive communities are built in desert climates. Heaven forbid we re-think how feasible it is to keep a city like Las Vegas going-- and I say that as someone who has quite enjoyed visiting.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
17,600
Not everybody has a garage.

If it is very cold out, your cold windshield may frost back over while you are driving, unless the air out of the defrost has warmed up first-which requires the engine to be running for a bit.
Hardly anyone has a garage in Berlin and few cars have A/C. More now than there used to be. Still, in summer you open/opened the windows and in winter you are a little chilly until the heating warms up enough. That was/is just the way it is. 🤷‍♀️
There are also signs on every railroad crossing to shut off the engine while you wait.

Otherwise, in the olden days, you had to let the engine oil warm up. Cars are designed differently nowadays, but a lot of people learned the old way and keep doing it.
They're folks my age, so they shouldn't have had cars like that. They're even people who have one car that's a hybrid and otherwise climate conscious.

Water cuts coming in the West as water levels fall in Lake Mead and Lake Powell:

Salt Lake City has a different kind of a problem as the Great Salt Lake dries up. Changing weather in the ski resorts and arsenic that's released into the air. https://www.nytimes.com/2022/06/07/climate/salt-lake-city-climate-disaster.html
 

susan6

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,236
The weather is crazily hot for June here in France.
My student in Bordeaux just told me that it is 40c there and will be 42c tomorrow! 🤯🔥
Europe heatwave: Outdoor events banned in parts of France

Droughts as a result
https://www.linternaute.com/bricola...-en-alerte-quels-departements-sont-concernes/
I'm wondering how this will affect the Tour de France. I know there have been some editions of the Vuelta a Espana where a lot of the peloton was vomiting their way across Spain because of heat stress.
The sad thing is that this might be the coolest summer of the rest of our lives.
 

taz'smum

'Be Kind' - every skater has their own story
Messages
3,193
The sad thing is that this might be the coolest summer of the rest of our lives.
Hard hitting but spot on words when I am finding this latest heatwave long and tiring 🥵🔥 yet still another 2-3 days to go before more live-able temperatures.

I’ve developed a routine of waking at 5am in order to open all the windows to let in the ‘cooler’ air before the heat of the day. Unfortunately it has barely dropped below 24c all night long, yesterday not below 26c.

These heatwaves are life altering- you just have to get through them.

This one is the most worrying ever as it is a month earlier than usual and yet still breaking heat records!

I fear for the rest of the summer let alone the coming years!😱😱😱
 
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BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
60,780
If anyone needs some context for the above video, try this.

UN Warns Two Largest Reservoirs in US Are Approaching Dangerous 'Dead Pool' Status


From the article:
"The two largest reservoirs in the U.S., Lake Powell and Lake Mead, are part of the Colorado River watershed, and are both on the precipice of reaching dangerous "dead pool" status, according to the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP), with water levels dropping so low that water no longer flows downstream from the reservoirs.

"Overconsumption and the climate crisis could lead to water levels so low that downstream flows to hydroelectric plants would stop," tweeted UNEP, which would jeopardize access to electricity for millions of people in western states. ...

The dry conditions in the West have become so prolonged, said UNEP ecosystems expert Lis Mullin Bernhardt, that "drought" is no longer the appropriate word to describe them.

"We refer to it as 'aridification'—a new very dry normal," Bernhardt said in a statement.

People across the American West are among about 2.3 billion people around the world who face water stress annually, as up to 40% of the world's land has become degraded—a condition that can be driven by drought."

We are politics-as-usual-ling ourselves into a very difficult future.
 

Andora

Skating season ends as baseball season begins
Messages
11,679
I loved Las Vegas when I had the opportunity to visit a few times last decade. I can't imagine going now. Gambling/mob history aside, it feels completely inappropriate/immoral to go back.

People want their homes/magic experiences in desert climates. I don't know that it's possible to undo that entitlement that's baked into certain populations.
 

sk8pics

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,223
@Andora I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but the article I read in the NYTimes today did talk about how Las Vegas has reduced its water use while its population has increased. Other western and southwestern states could learn from them.
 

Andora

Skating season ends as baseball season begins
Messages
11,679
@Andora I don’t necessarily disagree with you, but the article I read in the NYTimes today did talk about how Las Vegas has reduced its water use while its population has increased. Other western and southwestern states could learn from them.

That's good news for sure.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,863
There are many posts today about how The Inflation Reduction Act, which was confirmed by the Senate today, is the biggest climate action in U.S. history. I did a quick Google search to see what kind of articles might be available about the climate portion of this bill & here are a scattering from a variety of different types of sources. The bill goes to the House next & still needs to pass there. That said, 🤞 that today's vote was the biggest hurdle, as the Senate is split 50/50, and could not afford to lose a single vote from a single Democrat.

The Inflation Reduction Act Is The Most Important Climate Action In U.S. History​

5 Major Benefits of the Inflation Reduction Act’s Climate Investments​


Inflation Reduction Act would spur 42% US carbon emissions cut by 2030: Princeton-led study​


What Is the Climate Impact of the Inflation Reduction Act?​


What the Inflation Reduction Act Means for Climate​


Why we need the Inflation Reduction Act​

 

BittyBug

Disgusted
Messages
25,025
As an environmentalist, I am deeply disappointed by the provisions requiring additional leasing on public lands and especially offshore Alaska. We are already in a carbon hole and should not be adding to it. My only hope is that fossil fuel projects will become unfeasible financially due to risk, cost, public pressure, etc., that such projects will never end up being realized, but in reality I think we've passed the point of no return and all of this is just fiddling while the planet literally burns.
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
60,780
As an environmentalist, I am deeply disappointed by the provisions requiring additional leasing on public lands and especially offshore Alaska. We are already in a carbon hole and should not be adding to it. My only hope is that fossil fuel projects will become unfeasible financially due to risk, cost, public pressure, etc., that such projects will never end up being realized, but in reality I think we've passed the point of no return and all of this is just fiddling while the planet literally burns.

Except things can always get worse until all life is dead, so we have to keep trying to avert worse from happening.

The legislation in and of itself is at best a mixed bag but its a step in the right direction. The question is if we can now take the next steps.

This will depend on whether people who vote see this as a motivation to vote for candidates who will work to take us to the next steps.

I'm not particularly optimistic on that.
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
60,780
Tell me again why we shouldn't act to reduce future global warming. Do people want to experience this kind of thing more and more? Transitioning quickly from fossil fuels will be disruptive? What do you call these floods?

America’s summer of floods: climate crisis fueling barrage, scientists say (The Guardian)



In an 11-day span, the US experienced at least four flooding events that would each normally be expected once every 1,000 years, or have a 0.1% chance of happening in any given year. Scientists say extreme rainfall spurred by climate breakdown is rendering many of these historical norms obsolete.

“We are going to have to change the labeling because these are not one-in-1,000-years events any more,” said Andreas Prein, an expert in climate extremes at the National Center for Atmospheric Research. “It’s shocking to see all of this flood damage but it follows a pattern. These rare events are becoming more and more common and our infrastructure is just not keeping up.”

America’s summer of flooding has thrown up extraordinary spectacles, such as a large building being wrenched from its foundations and carried away by surging flood water in Yellowstone in June. The main road entrances to the national park were severed by what officials called “unprecedented” flooding and took a month to fully reopen.

This week, a dozen motorists had to be rescued from the windows of their cars after intense rainfall caused roads in Denver to become more like swimming pools.
 

BittyBug

Disgusted
Messages
25,025
Tell me again why we shouldn't act to reduce future global warming. Do people want to experience this kind of thing more and more? Transitioning quickly from fossil fuels will be disruptive? What do you call these floods?
The problem is twofold: Congress members are funded by fossil fuel companies, and their constituents are too focused on their own short-term needs, believing (a) these types of events happen to other people (like gun violence), and/or (b) climate change is "natural" - the climate has always been changing (true, but not to this extent) - and therefore out of their hands.

We've seen this reasoning from fellow posters. Either they don't believe we're ready to take action because the infrastructure for clean energy is not yet widespread, or despite the overwhelming agreement by scientists that humans are causing the catastrophic warming of our planet, they don't believe the science because (insert reason).

Bottom line: the fossil fuel industry and those who have interests in it (Koch Bros, Mercers, etc.) have done a masterful job of pushing propaganda that obfuscates the truth. And they've bought their politicians (and SCOTUS reps) so we're basically screwed.

Silver lining: no need to worry about Social Security running out of money because we're all going to go up in smoke or drown before then. [/sarcasm]
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
17,782
Many countries in the world have very real energy crises now. E.g., in the UK, we are being told to expect rolling blackouts, and the average household has seen their energy bills rise exponentially, to the point where the government is projecting that the average Brit will spend 25-33% of their take-home pay on fuel and energy this winter. This is not acceptable on any level. We can moan about repeated failures of government, and I don't disagree, but we need to do something now. Drilling in the North Sea has to be on the table, same way as drilling in Alaska needs to be for the U.S. Solving today's energy crisis and getting closer to energy independence have to be top priorities, though I do hope short-term moves will be coupled with a better long-term plan. Right now, the bigger danger is in the short-term. We're going to see economic and social unrest, not to mention unsafe and un-environmental attempts at keeping homes warm, if we don't do something NOW to give people immediate relief. The UK, at least, is now literally at the point where a warm home will be a middle-class luxury. Net-zero by 2050 can wait a few more years if need be.

Much of Europe is in equally bad or worse shape.
 

Debdelilah2

Member
Messages
41
Many countries in the world have very real energy crises now. E.g., in the UK, we are being told to expect rolling blackouts, and the average household has seen their energy bills rise exponentially, to the point where the government is projecting that the average Brit will spend 25-33% of their take-home pay on fuel and energy this winter. This is not acceptable on any level. We can moan about repeated failures of government, and I don't disagree, but we need to do something now. Drilling in the North Sea has to be on the table, same way as drilling in Alaska needs to be for the U.S. Solving today's energy crisis and getting closer to energy independence have to be top priorities, though I do hope short-term moves will be coupled with a better long-term plan. Right now, the bigger danger is in the short-term. We're going to see economic and social unrest, not to mention unsafe and un-environmental attempts at keeping homes warm, if we don't do something NOW to give people immediate relief. The UK, at least, is now literally at the point where a warm home will be a middle-class luxury. Net-zero by 2050 can wait a few more years if need be.

Much of Europe is in equally bad or worse shape.
https://connectusfund.org/17-anwr-oil-drilling-pros-and-cons
“On the average year in the United States, there are 3.7 billion barrels of oil which come through American ports. The total that is available in this wildlife region would allow for about 6 years of independence at best assuming that the current consumption levels stay the say. The additional products coming from here would not make a significant difference on the price of crude oil as an international commodity, nor would it help to foster energy independence in an impactful way. The results would create a minimal uptick in what could be stored as an emergency reserve at best.”

I’ve heard similar things about the Keystone pipeline- that it involves a very large expense for a small amount of product. But I linked to a site that argues both sides, pro drilling first.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,863

Democrats Designed the Climate Law to Be a Game Changer. Here’s How.​

In a first, the measure legally defines greenhouse gases as pollution. That’ll make new regulations much tougher to challenge in court.


"When the Supreme Court restricted the ability of the Environmental Protection Agency to fight climate change this year, the reason it gave was that Congress had never granted the agency the broad authority to shift America away from burning fossil fuels.

Now it has.

Throughout the landmark climate law, passed this month, is language written specifically to address the Supreme Court’s justification for reining in the E.P.A., a ruling that was one of the court’s most consequential of the term. The new law amends the Clean Air Act, the country’s bedrock air-quality legislation, to define the carbon dioxide produced by the burning of fossil fuels as an “air pollutant.”

That language, according to legal experts as well as the Democrats who worked it into the legislation, explicitly gives the E.P.A. the authority to regulate greenhouse gases and to use its power to push the adoption of wind, solar and other renewable energy sources."
 

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