The Biden-Harris Administration

once_upon

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18,358
MSNBC had a poll this morning on the infrastructure bill. It has broad support among voters nearly 80% across the board with 50% of Republicans. The congressional GOP are so out of touch.

Oh, don't worry. They'll be sure to take credit for whatever $$$ come their district's way.
Democrats need to do more of this.


Oops has the forbidden words try this one

There are similar ones in several states
 

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
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18,659
Source?

Here's the first one I found:

Doesn't look like 5% to me! Maybe you have a very specific definition of what infrastructure means?
Here is a summary of major items in President Biden's infrastructure bill:

Infrastructure at home ($650 billion)
  • $213 billion to build and retrofit 2 million homes, including public housing
  • $111 billion for clean drinking water (including removing lead pipes)
  • $100 billion to build and upgrade public schools
  • $100 billion for broadband Internet to the 35% of rural Americans who don't have it
  • $25 billion to upgrade child-care facilities
  • $12 billion for community colleges
  • $18 billion for veterans' hospitals
  • $10 billion for upgrading federal buildings
National infrastructure ($621 billion)
  • $174 billion for a network of 500,000 electric vehicle chargers
  • $115 billion for fixing up roads and bridges, as well as improving safety for drivers and cyclists
  • $85 billion for modernizing mass transit systems
  • $80 billion to fix Amtrak's maintenance backlog
  • $50 billion for disaster resilience
  • $25 billion to improve airports, including terminal renovation and improving car-free access to airports
  • $17 billion for inland waterways, ports, and ferries
  • A proposal to replace 50,000 diesel transit vehicles and to electrify 20% of school buses
Research and development, manufacturing, and training ($580 billion)
  • $180 billion for R&D, especially related to clean energy
  • $50 billion for domestic semiconductor manufacturing
  • Incentives for companies to relocate to the "industrial heartland"
  • A million apprenticeships and a more inclusive science and technology workforce
Care economy ($400 billion)
  • Help move people out of nursing homes and back to their own home with support
  • Benefits for caretakers, who are disproportionately women of color
Five percent $2.251 trillion is $112.55 billion.

The 🦭 can bark for himself, but I'm guessing that he is 🦜 -ing someone who has seized on the $115 billion for roads and bridges as if that were all that was earmarked for infrastructure spending.
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
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66,517
The care economy will save millions of dollars. It is far less expensive to pay caregivers to come to someone's home than it is to pay the $$$$$$ involved in nursing homes. 70% of the medicaid money paid goes straight to profit for the owners and not to care or supplies for the patient. States that finally started waiver services proved this decades ago, but the nursing home industry did not want that to become the norm. I fought this for years with Micah and learned how to maneuver through the system. He lived 20 years longer by my keeping him at home than he would have if I'd put him in a nursing home. I used a pediatric facility for two months on a part time basis and he picked up bug after bug until I pulled him out. When I came one day and there was a puddle of urine under his chair, I went to the director and demanded to know why he wasn't in an adult diaper (which I knew was covered) and she said they didn't make any money if they actually put them on patients. I loaded him up and told her he was discharged effective immediately.
 

ballettmaus

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16,194
The Biden task-force found 5,600 files that may reveal additional kids that were separated from their families. https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/im...-finds-5-600-files-may-identify-more-n1263329

The new files are from the Health and Human Services Office of Refugee Resettlement between Jan. 20., 2017, and July 2017, a time period not included in the American Civil Liberties Union's lawsuit against the Trump administration over family separations.

...

"We now believe there may have been separations in the first six months of the Trump administration and we applaud the task force for agreeing to review cases during this time period. Whether the task force finds one or many additional separations, it is essential that we find every last child cruelly taken from their parents by our government."


I would not be surprised if that turned out to be the case.
 

Frau Muller

Proud Puerto Rican-Russkaya!
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13,225
The Republicans massively blew their chance. They controlled both Houses of Congress and had a president who was all for an infrastructure plan in 2017. What did they do?

Nothing.

This is where if it were a functioning party they'd overthrow Mitch McConnell because nobody is more responsible for that missed political opportunity than he is. He wanted only one thing: tax cuts for the rich and corporations.

And his followers such as they are said that would do the same as an infrastructure program because if you give the corporations general tax cuts they'll invest it in ... public infrastructure... sure...

And thus the only hope for the Republican Party in the near term is for the Biden adminstration to crash and burn because the Republicans are offering no alternative. They could lick their wounds and build back up to gain support by being a constructive player but they are going to choose the McConnell way of total obstruction and hope that crashes everything so they can take advantage of chaos. Except their talent is sowing chaos, not fixing it.

We need a new major party, a totally revamped Republican or Conservative Party because this is ridiculous.
The Ruling Class of the DC area - whether R or D - only cares about maintaining the status quo Contracting system. For Mitch, his wife, and their ilk, it’s all about $$$ and not rocking the boat on awarding contracts and favors. Feathering their nests. Any outside threat to “the system,” regardless of party, is the enemy. If we want a truly viable 2nd party, it should be led by a true progressive, younger than Bernie but of his mindset. Someone who sees our new immigrants as more than cheap labor and future votes. A massive clean-up of the system is required. It may not happen in our lifetimes but who knows? Miracles can happen.
 

clairecloutier

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11,424
A column by Ezra Klein about why and how Biden has moved to the left as President:


Overall, it's a somewhat heartening piece. I have my issues with what's gone on since the election, but I certainly do appreciate the generally leftward and unapologetic trend of the administration.

On balance with that, though, we had this lovely piece yesterday from Senator Joe Manchin, in which he said he would not support restructuring, weakening, or getting rid of the filibuster and instead supposedly wants bipartisan legislation.

Someone posited on WaPo that Manchin secretly wants to get back to the days of McConnell leading the Senate, because that meant no pressure and no hard choices for him, as bills mostly got killed without ever coming up for a vote. I wouldn't be surprised if that's his whole game.


 

Dobre

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9,816
On balance with that, though, we had this lovely piece yesterday from Senator Joe Manchin, in which he said he would not support restructuring, weakening, or getting rid of the filibuster and instead supposedly wants bipartisan legislation.
I understand that he wants to be known as an individual.

As an individual, though, I sure wouldn't want to be the name & face that goes down with killing democracy. If voting rights do not get passed soon, he could easily get more of the blame as an individual than any solitary Republican.

(I understand that there is more than one way to pass voting rights, but it's got to be done. And it has to be done before Republicans try to manhandle the results of the midterm elections).
 
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caseyedwards

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16,269
A column by Ezra Klein about why and how Biden has moved to the left as President:


Overall, it's a somewhat heartening piece. I have my issues with what's gone on since the election, but I certainly do appreciate the generally leftward and unapologetic trend of the administration.

On balance with that, though, we had this lovely piece yesterday from Senator Joe Manchin, in which he said he would not support restructuring, weakening, or getting rid of the filibuster and instead supposedly wants bipartisan legislation.

Someone posited on WaPo that Manchin secretly wants to get back to the days of McConnell leading the Senate, because that meant no pressure and no hard choices for him, as bills mostly got killed without ever coming up for a vote. I wouldn't be surprised if that's his whole game.


Manchin during the Trump era opposed all of the big initiatives of republicans. Never helping with anything like obamacare repeal or tax cuts or immigration either. But so far he has voted 100% of time with Biden. All he wants is to make bills less liberal. He never wants anything conservatives passed. Just not totally liberal.
 

clairecloutier

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11,424
Manchin during the Trump era opposed all of the big initiatives of republicans. Never helping with anything like obamacare repeal or tax cuts or immigration either. But so far he has voted 100% of time with Biden. All he wants is to make bills less liberal. He never wants anything conservatives passed. Just not totally liberal.


You really need to read Joe Manchin's bio. It details numerous areas in which he has supported Republican and/or Trump policies. So yes, he does want things passed that conservatives want passed. As to voting 100% of the time with Biden, LOL. At this point, that more or less equates to a single yes vote on the American Rescue Plan, which was extracted only under duress.


Joe Manchin is a DINO.

ETA: And, in a WaPo editorial today, Jennifer Rubin argues that Manchin likes the filibuster--just as I speculated earlier--because it allows him to avoid hard votes and unpopular positions. When nothing happens and no votes are taken, as Rubin points out, responsibility is diffused. "For a conservative Democrat (or a moderate Republican when his or her party has the majority), the filibuster often allows one to hide from difficult choices." If you look at Manchin's Wiki bio, you'll see there are several controversial bills from years past that he just never voted on because he was "absent."

So, Joe Manchin is also a do-nothing DINO.

 
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clairecloutier

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Not really. Manchin is on the conservative edge of the Democratic party, but he's supported and voted for plenty of key Democratic priorities. And I'm sure I don't need to tell you that he's better than the alternative, and has to play it smart to keep winning in West Virginia. Ask @rfisher.

You can tell it to me all you want. That doesn't mean I will agree.

At this point I don't see much difference between him and a Republican.

Or, let him prove over the next year that there IS a difference.
 

MsZem

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At this point I don't see much difference between him and a Republican.
Really?

AFAIK they don't have a tracker for the Biden presidency, but this looks interesting:

You're not going to get anyone more progressive elected to statewide office in West Virginia in the foreseeable future. It may be possible to replace Sinema with someone more left-leaning, but you'd need a really good candidate.
 

caseyedwards

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16,269
You really need to read Joe Manchin's bio. It details numerous areas in which he has supported Republican and/or Trump policies. So yes, he does want things passed that conservatives want passed. As to voting 100% of the time with Biden, LOL. At this point, that more or less equates to a single yes vote on the American Rescue Plan, which was extracted only under duress.


Joe Manchin is a DINO.

ETA: And, in a WaPo editorial today, Jennifer Rubin argues that Manchin likes the filibuster--just as I speculated earlier--because it allows him to avoid hard votes and unpopular positions. When nothing happens and no votes are taken, as Rubin points out, responsibility is diffused. "For a conservative Democrat (or a moderate Republican when his or her party has the majority), the filibuster often allows one to hide from difficult choices." If you look at Manchin's Wiki bio, you'll see there are several controversial bills from years past that he just never voted on because he was "absent."

So, Joe Manchin is also a do-nothing DINO.

He never supported a trump policy. It was just recent. It just happened. He never voted with trump on an issue ever. Maybe except fracking and coal mining. But that’s all I can remember!
 

clairecloutier

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11,424
AFAIK they don't have a tracker for the Biden presidency, but this looks interesting:

You're not going to get anyone more progressive elected to statewide office in West Virginia in the foreseeable future. It may be possible to replace Sinema with someone more left-leaning, but you'd need a really good candidate.

That article is from March 7. Since then, Manchin has thrown shade on the prospect of doing the infrastructure etc. bill through reconciliation. And he's been telling anyone who will listen how he's not going to reform the filibuster and won't do anything without bipartisan action.

Like I said, he can show where he stands on the issues. Until he does, my opinion of him will stay the same. Yeah, he voted for the initial Biden relief bill, but only after extensive arm twisting, and only after personally seeing to the reduction of unemployment benefits for thousands and the elimination of thousands of families from any stimulus benefit.

And that may very well be the last Democratic bill he ever votes for. I would not be surprised if that is the case.

His latest thing, I guess, is suggesting that we shouldn't go too far with voting rights legislation because that might upset the Trump supporters out there.


I don't really care if he wins again in WV or not. He can't be counted on. He is not reliable. The Democrats are going to have to figure out how to win more Senate seats elsewhere, it's that simple. The fact that we failed in so many races in 2020 is an indictment of the party's messaging and candidate selection and I just hope someone, somewhere, in the party can figure out how to do better in 2022.

That this thread keeps turning into the Joe Manchin Appreciation Society is laughable. I suppose you all spent time reading the "Joe Manchin is a political genius" articles a couple weeks ago too.
 

MsZem

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15,460
And that may very well be the last Democratic bill he ever votes for. I would not be surprised if that is the case.
Claire, I'm sorry but this is ridiculous and you know it.

The fact that this thread keeps turning into the Joe Manchin Appreciation Society is laughable. I suppose you all spent time reading the "Joe Manchin is a political genius" articles a couple weeks ago too.
I read rfisher's posts. Personally I think Joe Biden is a political genius. He's getting a lot done without making a production out of it. Experience matters.

Living as I do in Bibiland, trust me - you're better off with the current US political landscape. Including Manchin.
 

caseyedwards

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16,269
Just think it’s interesting to note Clinton had to deal with 20 Manchin’s! Obama close to 10. Biden only has 2. Getting to zero! That’s because try Democratic Party has really reached total ideological purity in every state.
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
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58,255
I'm more irritated with Sinema than Manchin. I mean granted if he won't support any iteration of the infrastructure bill that is pretty close to being the kind of friend you say of "with friends like this who needs enemies," but we don't yet know if Dems can pull off getting his vote for a meaningful bill.

I think AZ could have a Senator who would vote with Biden. Actually it does, Mark Kelly. I don't get Sinema at all.
 

clairecloutier

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11,424
Claire, I'm sorry but this is ridiculous and you know it.


I read rfisher's posts. Personally I think Joe Biden is a political genius. He's getting a lot done without making a production out of it. Experience matters.

Living as I do in Bibiland, trust me - you're better off with the current US political landscape. Including Manchin.


LOL! I hope you sent all those columnists a thumbs-up on their "genius" articles! :rofl:
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
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58,255
No one here likes Joe Manchin's politics. But we think it would be worse to have another Shelley Moore Capito instead (or worse it could be a Marsha Blackburn).

I was quite upset when he hinted he won't support another bill passing through reconciliation. But its one of those things you just can't do anything about. What we can do is work to get more Dems into the Senate from other states in 2022. And if Manchin goes along with Republicans torpedoing Joe Biden's agenda then Dems need to campaign on getting the infrastructure bill passed in 2023 because it is a very popular bill and Republicans can yell "woke" and "cancel culture" all they want, they aren't going to win elections on that.

I wonder if there's anything Biden could give Alaska to get Murkowski on board? Maybe he should look beyond Manchin if he can't get him.
 

Dobre

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9,816
I wonder if there's anything Biden could give Alaska to get Murkowski on board?
Honestly, if the Biden administration advertises any kind of major infrastructure project for a specific Republican Senator's state . . . how well is that Senator going to do turning it down?

At the moment the press coverage for the plan is very broad. It's difficult for people to see how it will impact them. But I mean . . . there has to be more than one Republican Senator that owes blank construction company or a significant Republican voting constituency that really needs a big local project. I'm not suggesting favoritism. Just more detailed state-specific communication. (I know the administration is working on this, but they could turn up the dial if they needed to; don't you think?) This is what the plan is all about. Infrastructure in places that need it & aren't likely to be prioritized for it without federal help.

I realize that many Republican leaders are currently on their own planet. But when someone proposes a major infrastructure project where I live--when it becomes a real possibility & people know the actual details & can actually anticipate an improvement in their lives--if you kabosh the plan, they hold a grudge foreeeeever. (Hence, the folks that were hoping for a fracking boom are bummed). I think if the administration were to get into the nitty gritty, bring the message home to people in a particular state with specifics about what folks have to gain or lose, state constituents & associated businesses could be pretty convincing.
 

Amy L

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6,149
I wonder if there's anything Biden could give Alaska to get Murkowski on board? Maybe he should look beyond Manchin if he can't get him.

Aren't a lot of Alaskan cities/towns not connected by road? I know the small airline business is big there. There's a lot of pork potential in that state to woo Murkowski.
 

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