Russian women news & updates, 2021-22 season

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soogar

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The more I learn about Russian women's figure skating, the more it seems like Tuktamysheva is the exception. Her relationship with Mishin seems to be a healthy one.
I think it's because Mishin is older and already established and respected. No one can take away his accomplishments as a coach. These other coaches are up and coming and hungry for success. It's not as if Russia is alone or that figure skating is the only sport this happens. It doesn't surprise me that the athlete is not the top priority when the coaches are funded by the state and prize money.
 

hanca

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I think it's because Mishin is older and already established and respected. No one can take away his accomplishments as a coach. These other coaches are up and coming and hungry for success. It's not as if Russia is alone or that figure skating is the only sport this happens. It doesn't surprise me that the athlete is not the top priority when the coaches are funded by the state and prize money.
Well, Mishin is no saint either. He may be respected, and it is a good PR he presents to the world, but he has a nasty side too. What he has done to Nugumanova and Lozko… He completely destroyed Lozko’s career only because she wanted to change coaches. He kicked Nugumanova out of his group and then he withdrew her from the nationals where she qualified through her skating… Kicking someone out of his school, I can understand that. But then interfering with her skating career by withdrawing her from a competition where the skater qualified, that’s simply wrong. Results from the nationals decide about funding for the following season, so he practically ensured she couldn’t earn the funding; he interfered with her whole next season.
 
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soogar

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Well, Mishin is no saint either. He may be respected, and it is a good PR he presents to the world, but he has a nasty side too. What he has done to Nugumanova and Lozko… He completely destroyed Lozko’s career only because she wanted to change coaches. He kicked Nugumanova out of his group and then he withdrew her from the nationals where she qualified through her skating… Kicking someone out of his school, I can understand that. But then interfering with her skating career by withdrawing her from a competition where the skater qualified, that’s simply wrong. Results from the nationals decide about funding for the following season, so he practically ensured she couldn’t earn the funding; he interfered with her whole next season.
Is that the same Nugumanova in the interview? These coaches kept her out of nationals as well. If this situation has repeated, maybe there is something else going on behind the scenes.
 

hanca

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Is that the same Nugumanova in the interview? These coaches kept her out of nationals as well. If this situation has repeated, maybe there is something else going on behind the scenes.
It is the same Nugumanova, but are mistaken - her coaches did not keep her out of nationals this season. She did not qualify because she placed only 5th and 11th at the Russian cups (the qualifying events). It wasn’t good enough. Not surprising, she scored 159 and 163 points at her two events. For a Russian senior lady, very, very poor results. But in the interview, she says her current coach kept her off the Russian cup final (not off the nationals).
 

Bigbird

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Ruslan Zhighanshin said it best many years ago, the club is exclusive to the set few who are determined to endure at all costs. All this has been said before. Enduring is seen as a badge of honor. As some would say it is a special war. The ones who raise objections are branded as weak criminals. Nothing new and it may never change given the ethos of the FED, gold or bust.
 
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rfisher

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Well, Liza was in Mishin's group originally as a junior and he asked her to leave. This doesn't sound like Rukavitsin at all so you have to wonder what the other side of the story is. When a skater is asked to leave one group and then has issues with another, you have to wonder if it's the skater who has the problem. Which is a pity because I really like Nugu's skating, but she's always been very inconsistent.
 

Vagabond

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While they are not the only victims of abuse in Russian figure skating, I note that the two active women with the best basic skating, Nugumanova and Kostornaia, have been targets. The cynic in me thinks that they were singled out not because of any perceived deficiencies but rather because of their strengths.
 

miffy

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While they are not the only victims of abuse in Russian figure skating, I note that the two active women with the best basic skating, Nugumanova and Kostornaia, have been targets. The cynic in me thinks that they were singled out not because of any perceived deficiencies but rather because of their strengths.
I really want Kostornaia to switch countries but I guess they wouldn’t release her. Even if she doesn’t get the axel back she can still be competitive and wonderful to watch. But I doubt she’ll make it out of Nationals whenever Russians are allowed back.
 

DimaToe

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There is so much talent in the Russian women’s field, if there is a chance for more of them to skate for another federation under training and living conditions that benefit them I hope that those who can take that opportunity.
 

ChelleC

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Vagabond

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Various coaches and other regarding Nugumanova's interview.

Required reading for anyone who wants to understand how children develop eating disorders and how people close ranks when one of their own is accused of bullying.

As for the dude from Sambo-70, "screams and reconciliation" indeed! :rolleyes:
 

Wyliefan

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Man, I am really sick of the Russian authorities popping out of the woodwork to chant "FAT! FAT! FAT!" any time a skater dares to open her mouth about abuse. :mad: Can we just get all their skaters switched over to different countries, and ban Russia from skating forever? No country is perfect, but few are quite as awful as this.
 

Ena Grins

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While they are not the only victims of abuse in Russian figure skating, I note that the two active women with the best basic skating, Nugumanova and Kostornaia, have been targets. The cynic in me thinks that they were singled out not because of any perceived deficiencies but rather because of their strengths.
They also strike me as two of the more independent-minded women figure skaters in Russia. How dare they develop something of a life outside of figure skating while continuing to skate...
 

Vagabond

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giselle23

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Man, I am really sick of the Russian authorities popping out of the woodwork to chant "FAT! FAT! FAT!" any time a skater dares to open her mouth about abuse. :mad: Can we just get all their skaters switched over to different countries, and ban Russia from skating forever? No country is perfect, but few are quite as awful as this.
It's interesting that the most successful Russian ladies skater in terms of medals won and longevity was not a stick figure. I'm talking about Irina Slutskaya. It sounded to me from Liza N's interview that she was being told to lose weight because of the way she looked, not because it affected her ability to perform her elements.
 

soogar

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It's interesting that the most successful Russian ladies skater in terms of medals won and longevity was not a stick figure. I'm talking about Irina Slutskaya. It sounded to me from Liza N's interview that she was being told to lose weight because of the way she looked, not because it affected her ability to perform her elements.
She didn't qualify for nationals. I would think that if she was landing her jumps, they wouldn't comment on her weight.


Not a singles skater, but another perspective from a pairs skater. Boikova's diet doesn't seem adequate for an athlete.
 

hanca

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She didn't qualify for nationals. I would think that if she was landing her jumps, they wouldn't comment on her weight.


Not a singles skater, but another perspective from a pairs skater. Boikova's diet doesn't seem adequate for an athlete.
Exactly. She did three competitions this last season and her scores were between 159 and 167, so she probably wasn’t landing much. That’s bad for a Russian lady to have season best 167. No matter how many competitions she would do, with scores as low as this, she would be buried.
 

bladesofgorey

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She didn't qualify for nationals. I would think that if she was landing her jumps, they wouldn't comment on her weight.


Not a singles skater, but another perspective from a pairs skater. Boikova's diet doesn't seem adequate for an athlete.
I don't know why you'd think they wouldn't comment on her weight- Russia is an anorexia factory. Just look at the Boikova instagram selfie alongside her quote about having a tendency to gain weight and tell me this isn't deeply sick.
 

soogar

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I don't know why you'd think they wouldn't comment on her weight- Russia is an anorexia factory. Just look at the Boikova instagram selfie alongside her quote about having a tendency to gain weight and tell me this isn't deeply sick.
I’ve seen enough interviews on TSL with Canadian and American coaches and they like to talk about weight all the time. Doug Haw was the one who said that Liza needed to lose 10 pounds and Frank Carroll and Eve Scotvold also talked about female skater bodies. The first thing skaters talk about is their weight and bodies so it’s not limited to Russia.
 

Pokitren

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Well, Mishin is no saint either. He may be respected, and it is a good PR he presents to the world, but he has a nasty side too. What he has done to Nugumanova and Lozko… He completely destroyed Lozko’s career only because she wanted to change coaches. He kicked Nugumanova out of his group and then he withdrew her from the nationals where she qualified through her skating… Kicking someone out of his school, I can understand that. But then interfering with her skating career by withdrawing her from a competition where the skater qualified, that’s simply wrong. Results from the nationals decide about funding for the following season, so he practically ensured she couldn’t earn the funding; he interfered with her whole next season.
In fact, it's very Russian. If something doesn't go according to his plan, the Russian will destroy... It's sad, but it's reality.

Hi everyone, let me join your forum.
 

screech

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I’ve seen enough interviews on TSL with Canadian and American coaches and they like to talk about weight all the time. Doug Haw was the one who said that Liza needed to lose 10 pounds and Frank Carroll and Eve Scotvold also talked about female skater bodies. The first thing skaters talk about is their weight and bodies so it’s not limited to Russia.
As a Canadian here, I can testify that our coaches are not innocent when it comes to weight talk (though as with anything, there are definitely differences in opinions there). When I was skating, there was another girl at my club who was the same height and weight as me. Her coach monitored every little thing she put into her body, trying to affect her weight. My coach said that I could actually do with gaining a few lbs. When I quit skating I was 18 and weighed 94 lbs (the heaviest I'd ever been to that point). To think that an adult was trying to restrict and monitor the diet of a teenage girl who weighed so little is scary to me in retrospect, and though my coach and I definitely had our differences, I'm forever grateful that she didn't treat me the same way.
 

PRlady

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American skaters like Gracie and Adam have been forthright about the weight pressure. The Russian coaches seem to be more forthright and cruel publicly, but that’s cultural. It is true however that the Russian PTB tend to downplay every criticism by talking about skaters’ weight.
 

soogar

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Here's another insightful interview from a Russian ice dancer.

They asked her many questions on feminism and objectivism in skating. Here are her answers regarding food intake.

A lot of girls in figure skating limit themselves in nutrition, starve, and in general, for the sake of the “ideal” weight, they do terrible things with themselves. Is such exhaustion the norm in figure skating?

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
Norm for whom? For a healthy person?

For your health.

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
Sport is not for health at all – forget about this phrase, please. Neither boys nor girls. Boys have damaged backs, girls have torn ligaments, everyone’s knees are hurting.

In any sport there is some kind of diet. For example, Lesha Erokhov always says that if he gains little weight, he can no longer do difficult jumps, so he is very careful about weight. For me it was a revelation, because I thought that boys can eat anything.

Another question is that figure skating is a sport that is considered to be an art. It really has a part of objectification. Therefore, here, probably, people face problems with eating disorders more often. Do I know even one girl in figure skating who honestly never gave a damn about what she eats? Probably only until 12 or 13 years old. And it’s good when this diet ends with the fact that you simply limit yourself before the competitions.

Is it hard to limit yourself?

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
It’s easier to stick to a healthy diet from a very early age and not know that there are super-sweet things, something fatty, fast food. Then it is easier for you to cross the line, after which you need to limit yourself in some way. And when you already know what it is, you just eat it and don’t even think about it. Of course, it’s hard to readjust when you can’t eat 60 percent of your normal diet.

Once I gained six kilograms in two weeks. I didn’t really understand what happened. Turned out I was just trying to eat healthy. I had vegetable soup in my diet, some kind of dry meat. I ate like a normal person and gained six kilos. After I realized: I will eat in the next life, apparently. Then I will also take care of my health.

The hardest part is losing weight. Losing weight and not getting into a pit of eating disorder is a very big luck. I wasn’t lucky – I had this, it was for many years. Of course, now I on the right path, I am trying to get out of this unpleasant place. I’m probably not ready to tell something specific yet – I don’t want to be defined as “ah, this is the skater who had it.”
 

Bigbird

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Here's another insightful interview from a Russian ice dancer.

They asked her many questions on feminism and objectivism in skating. Here are her answers regarding food intake.

A lot of girls in figure skating limit themselves in nutrition, starve, and in general, for the sake of the “ideal” weight, they do terrible things with themselves. Is such exhaustion the norm in figure skating?

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
Norm for whom? For a healthy person?

For your health.

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
Sport is not for health at all – forget about this phrase, please. Neither boys nor girls. Boys have damaged backs, girls have torn ligaments, everyone’s knees are hurting.

In any sport there is some kind of diet. For example, Lesha Erokhov always says that if he gains little weight, he can no longer do difficult jumps, so he is very careful about weight. For me it was a revelation, because I thought that boys can eat anything.

Another question is that figure skating is a sport that is considered to be an art. It really has a part of objectification. Therefore, here, probably, people face problems with eating disorders more often. Do I know even one girl in figure skating who honestly never gave a damn about what she eats? Probably only until 12 or 13 years old. And it’s good when this diet ends with the fact that you simply limit yourself before the competitions.

Is it hard to limit yourself?

Elizaveta Khudaiberdieva:
It’s easier to stick to a healthy diet from a very early age and not know that there are super-sweet things, something fatty, fast food. Then it is easier for you to cross the line, after which you need to limit yourself in some way. And when you already know what it is, you just eat it and don’t even think about it. Of course, it’s hard to readjust when you can’t eat 60 percent of your normal diet.

Once I gained six kilograms in two weeks. I didn’t really understand what happened. Turned out I was just trying to eat healthy. I had vegetable soup in my diet, some kind of dry meat. I ate like a normal person and gained six kilos. After I realized: I will eat in the next life, apparently. Then I will also take care of my health.

The hardest part is losing weight. Losing weight and not getting into a pit of eating disorder is a very big luck. I wasn’t lucky – I had this, it was for many years. Of course, now I on the right path, I am trying to get out of this unpleasant place. I’m probably not ready to tell something specific yet – I don’t want to be defined as “ah, this is the skater who had it.”
I say it all the time, the one's who get out are the smart ones. This is not something you do for life but a small fraction of it.
 

giselle23

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She didn't qualify for nationals. I would think that if she was landing her jumps, they wouldn't comment on her weight.
But that isn't what she said. She said she looked OK--as if it that was the issue. And why is the issue always weight when someone isn't landing their jumps? There are a lot of thin skaters who have trouble landing their jumps, too.
 
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