Russia

Dobre

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12,000 Russian Troops Were Supposed To Defend Kaliningrad. Then They Went To Ukraine To Die.​

 

Dobre

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14,235

Propaganda’s Worst Enemy​


"Genia and project cofounder Michael Sprague have deep-seated beliefs that information must be freely accessible for a society to thrive and that dictators and autocrats hurt their citizens, and subsequently the entire world, when they selectively silence certain media outlets or individuals in their nations and replace them with state propaganda.

They (along with very talented engineers based in both Russia and Ukraine) developed a prototype technology that makes access to and distribution of “banned” content a trivial problem. Furthermore, this technology is designed so that it will be extremely difficult for autocratic regimes to block. Samizdat Online generates ever-changing and convoluted links that anyone can click on and see whatever content they lead to without the need for any additional technologies akin to VPN. Any Internet user can click on one of our custom SOS-Links™.

My role was to bring SO to all my Russian resident liberal media outlets, which have been blocked by the Roskomnadzor and which were desperately looking for ways to reengage with their audiences. I was only too happy to participate, and we quickly developed relationships and started unblocking dozens of Russian and Belarusian sites. We assembled a strong team—Anna Trubacheva, editor-in-chief, a renowned journalist from Belarus, winner of the Golden Pen Award; talented editors Olga Baidakova and Shayan Shafii; as well as Tamara Ivanova, a well-known editor and screenwriter, author of major television projects in the US and Russia.

This month, we launched our news portal. Our near-term goals are to launch our own podcast and media channel and to continue to onboard as many blocked publications and voices as possible. We’ve come up with an optimistic formula and are doing everything to make it work: Information leads to ynderstanding, which leads to compassion, which leads to human flourishing.

Venturing Forth​


While the impulse to build this organization was provoked by the war in Ukraine, it quickly became obvious that Russia’s autocrat is just one of many whose people deserve the same consideration. We were not planning on venturing into Iran quite yet, but the events unfolding there over the past several weeks forced us to adjust our timetable. As of two weeks ago, we are now covering Iran and unblocking a multitude of publications that the Iranian leadership would rather Iranian citizens were unable to read.

As a person who has been working with the Samizdatonline.org team since the first month of its launch, I am, of course, an interested party—and as a journalist who has struggled with censorship restrictions all my life, even more so. In short, you can consider me biased, but I believe that the very fact of the appearance of such a project is already good news that is worth sharing.

And, yes, I’m a bit jealous of the 14-year-old Russian who wants to read a story on John Lennon and the Afghan War (Justin Bieber and the war in Ukraine) but who doesn’t have to spend days translating and rewriting the piece. For them, all it takes is to click once to read it, before copying the link to send to their friends. This brings me the hope that if everything’s happening that much faster now, then maybe Russian troops will withdraw from Ukraine much sooner than they did from Afghanistan when I first heard of samizdat."
 

clairecloutier

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A look at how the Russian import/export economy is faring, with graphics, from the New York Times:

 

caseyedwards

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India’s main economic minister was defending his country about not banning Indian companies from buying Russian goods and selling them to Europe
 

text_skate

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This is an highly interesting (and very long) article on how Russia eventually secures support, published by The Insider
By threatening to cut off uranium supplies, Moscow hopes to win many countries to its side in the confrontation with the West.

excerpts, which illustrates the policy
In Hungary, Rosatom was going to build Paks-2 NPP mainly at the expense of a EUR 10 billion government loan. In Finland, during the construction of the Hanhikivi-1 nuclear power plant worth 6.5 billion euros, the Russian state corporation assumed most of the financial risks, namely 5 billion euros. Half of those funds were supposed to come from the National Welfare Fund. Rosatom was unable to get any tax benefits or any other preferences but was ready to meet any conditions - just to build a nuclear power plant in Finland.

Still, Rosatom managed to pull off its most impressive feat of unprecedented generosity in Turkey. The Akkuyu NPP is being built there using an interest-free government loan of over 20 billion euros. The plant is being built according to the BOO (build-own-operate) principle. It is owned by a Turkish legal entity whose founders are companies based out of Russia. The Russian side will be involved in supporting the project at all stages: from design to decommissioning. The agreement was entered into without any financial obligations on the part of Turkey. The Russian budget will have to pay for everything: from the disposal of radioactive waste to the training of Turkish personnel in Russia and the decommissioning of the reactors. All this may cost approximately the same amount as the construction of the NPP. The consequences of an accident, if it ever occurs, will also have to be managed with Russian taxpayers' money, and in such event the sum may turn out to be infinitely large.
[...]
Not surprisingly, Ankara did not join the sanctions against Russia and also abstained from voting to suspend Russia's powers in the Council of Europe. Bangladesh, where Russia is also building the Ruppur nuclear power plant, also condemned the sanctions.
At the same time, the construction of Akkuyu will substantially increase Turkey's dependency on Russia for decades. When launched, the nuclear power plant will meet about 10 percent of the energy needs of the entire republic, while Ankara also receives half of the required amount of gas from Russia. According to the head of Rosatom, the state corporation plans to stay in Turkey for a period of up to 100 years.
 

text_skate

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grrr :angryfire, rrrruzzian neo-nazis stealing from Ukraine. low, lower...
article has interesting links to other meduza articles

The paramilitary group Rusich is one of multiple Russian far-right and neo-Nazi organizations that have fought in the war in Ukraine. Because it’s not an official part of the Russian Armed Forces, Rusich has had to find alternative ways of funding its members’ military equipment and medical needs — and has found the perfect solution in cryptocurrency. Meduza special correspondent Lilia Yapparova explains how Russian white supremacists have used the blockchain Ethereum to siphon money from a Ukrainian charity foundation — and how they’ve encouraged other Russian fighters to use crypto to extort money from the families of murdered POWs.

 

Vagabond

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22,804
🤔 It's curious that Russia invaded Ukraine to stop neo-Nazis there but doesn't do anything to stop them on its own territory.
;)
 

Dobre

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clairecloutier

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An article from The Guardian about how Russia is trying to indoctrinate young Russians with a youth paramilitary group (which is publicized & supported by a famous Russian gymnast, Nikita Nagornyy). It’s all such obvious echoes of Hitler Youth from the 1930s.

 

Hedwig

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An article from The Guardian about how Russia is trying to indoctrinate young Russians with a youth paramilitary group (which is publicized & supported by a famous Russian gymnast, Nikita Nagornyy). It’s all such obvious echoes of Hitler Youth from the 1930s.

It is strange - in a lot of ways it seems like he is copying Hitler to the dot. Did he not read the book till the end?
 

Vagabond

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22,804
An article from The Guardian about how Russia is trying to indoctrinate young Russians with a youth paramilitary group (which is publicized & supported by a famous Russian gymnast, Nikita Nagornyy). It’s all such obvious echoes of Hitler Youth from the 1930s.


While the Youth Army was founded in 2016, Putin's efforts to indoctrinate post-Soviet Russian youth go back long before that. I am gifting this article from 2007. The link will be valid for two weeks.


Yulia Kuliyeva, only 19 and already a commissar, sat at a desk and quizzed each young person who sat opposite her, testing for ideological fitness to participate in summer camp.

“Tell me, what achievements of Putin’s policy can you name?” she asked, referring to Russia’s president since 2000, Vladimir V. Putin.

“Well, it’s the stabilization in the economy,” the girl answered. “Pensions were raised.”

“Putin’s Generation” is growing up with a diet of anti-European and anti-American sentiment that could deepen the social and political divides between Russia and the West for decades to come.

Indeed.

It is strange - in a lot of ways it seems like he is copying Hitler to the dot. Did he not read the book till the end?

He is copying Stalin, for whom Putin's grandfather was a cook. And yes, Putin, read the book till the end and wants what he believes will be a happier ending this time.
 

text_skate

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Re. Putin: I found Masha Gessen's book about him extremly enlightening: The Man Without A Face.

At the moment I'm reading The Road to Unfreedom by Timothy Snyder, it's not just about Russia. The methods described which are used by Russia to influence people and countries in and outside of Russia go back quite a while. It's terrifying. How easily we might throw all away, what we cherish. The freedom to chose a life we want to life.
 

dinakt

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6,876
The video is only in Russian, alas (but worth a watch if one understands the language; it is much more detailed than the article); the article is from the Atlantic.

It is about Mikhail Voskresensky, one of the most famous Russian pianists and pedagogues, the Chair of Moscow Conservatory Piano department, and his quest at the age of 87 to leave the country.


 

Cachoo

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Really can’t someone on the inside stop Putin? I am hearing now that he wanted to invade Japan before Ukraine citing Nazis and racists in Japan (and a dispute over islands.). Enough already.
 

Husky

Active Member
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188
In a talkshow with a famous propagandist (forgot his name) the guests said that the next problem is Kazakhstan - bc they deliver the uranium for Russia's nuke production Rosatom. I think they want to scare everybody. Can't believe that they are stupid enough to attack a country that is most of the time an ally, even though K. does not support the war in Ukraine.
 

Husky

Active Member
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188
Can someone from Ukraine explain why Klitschko and Zelensky go at each other? I understand that there is some competition as Klitschko is a potential candidate for the presidency but what are their political convictions?

BTW Timoshenko is still there, but without any hope for a comeback? How does she get along with Klitschko?
 

text_skate

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1,716
The video is only in Russian, alas (but worth a watch if one understands the language; it is much more detailed than the article); the article is from the Atlantic.

It is about Mikhail Voskresensky, one of the most famous Russian pianists and pedagogues, the Chair of Moscow Conservatory Piano department, and his quest at the age of 87 to leave the country.


Thank you. I've never heard a thing about Mikhail Voskresensky. Very interesting person, charming, sharp. Happy he made it out.
 

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