Russia

caseyedwards

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17,641
Only Off-ramp is Ukraine agreeing to stop bombing the Russia backed and sponsored rebels of donetsk and Luhansk and recognize them. I mean that’s why Putin said he was bombing originally
 

hanca

Values her privacy
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12,384
NEW: Putin has placed the head of his foreign intelligence branch under HOUSE ARREST in the latest sign that he’s FURIOUS about how badly things are going for his military forces in Ukraine.

Isn’t that like shooting yourselves into your own foot? His head of foreign intelligence is not going to be any good to him when he can’t do his job. That just means that Putin will be without info gained by foreign intelligence branch. Wouldn’t it be more practical to take the family of the head of foreign intelligence as hostages, to ‘motivate’ him to work harder and more effectively, rather than keeping him under house arrest and preventing him do his job?
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
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49,184
Has anyone noticed how the number on political posts on FB the trolls have decreased? It was quite obvious to me yesterday when I was reading a particular thread which usually has a heap of troll activity.
There have been some articles about this too. There are two reasons. One is that a lot of Russian bots can't function because of all the restrictions that have been enacted to limit Russia's access to the internet. The other is that what bots are still functioning are focusing on pro-Russia propaganda.
 

BittyBug

Disgusted
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24,744
To me it ties to @Elka's post in the other thread about stealing people's small business. Putin thinks he can simply take whatever fancies him. In a small way, this was demonstrated when he blatantly stole Robert Kraft's Super Bowl ring in plain sight. He did it because he could get away with it, and he did the same with Crimea. And since he has not yet faced any consequences for this behavior, he thinks he can repeat it at will.
 

Sylvia

Rooting for underdogs!
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71,009
To me it ties to @Elka's post in the other thread about stealing people's small business.
This is the article posted by @PRlady that’s relevant to this thread as well (Stephen Kotkin is the Russia scholar):
This is a very good interview of one of the foremost Russian scholars. Interesting insights into how Putin got himself into this and the perils of authoritarian societies, but a bit sadly short on solutions.
 

Elka

Well-Known Member
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1,709
To me it ties to @Elka's post in the other thread about stealing people's small business. Putin thinks he can simply take whatever fancies him. In a small way, this was demonstrated when he blatantly stole Robert Kraft's Super Bowl ring in plain sight. He did it because he could get away with it, and he did the same with Crimea. And since he has not yet faced any consequences for this behavior, he thinks he can repeat it at will.
And not just Putin, but it goes throug the whole society. Raiders mentioned in the other thread were/are, I suppose, for bigger businesses and joint stock companies etc.

When I lived in St.Petersburg during Yeltsin's time you could get robbed by a policeman outside of a 5 star hotel (if there was any, one of the finest anyhow) of course it was during a night and if you were a foreigner. There might be shootings in the city. And lot of horrors I do not wish to reminisce.
And the privatisation was just a big robbery.

But then came this "law and order" after a chaos. When Russians already had learned that democracy = chaos. Step by step it became more and more difficult to be a foreigner in Russia. A lot of bureaucracy and they obviously wanted all the foreign companies get rid of foreign directors. But it was seemingly good for business anyhow. I do not remember the locals complaining. When I was told about the "take overs of the small companies" we were discussing building of a big residential area by a foreign company. It was a private conversation with an engineer. I was at that time already out of Putin's Russia, just visiting.
 

PRlady

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39,667
And not just Putin, but it goes throug the whole society. Raiders mentioned in the other thread were/are, I suppose, for bigger businesses and joint stock companies etc.

When I lived in St.Petersburg during Yeltsin's time you could get robbed by a policeman outside of a 5 star hotel (if there was any, one of the finest anyhow) of course it was during a night and if you were a foreigner. There might be shootings in the city. And lot of horrors I do not wish to reminisce.
And the privatisation was just a big robbery.

But then came this "law and order" after a chaos. When Russians already had learned that democracy = chaos. Step by step it became more and more difficult to be a foreigner in Russia. A lot of bureaucracy and they obviously wanted all the foreign companies get rid of foreign directors. But it was seemingly good for business anyhow. I do not remember the locals complaining. When I was told about the "take overs of the small companies" we were discussing building of a big residential area by a foreign company. It was a private conversation with an engineer. I was at that time already out of Putin's Russia, just visiting.
On a much smaller scale we are seeing a similar dynamic in US cities. Less than two years ago it was Black Lives Matter and police accountability. Now with a surge in crime from the pandemic and other factors, it’s all middle class people calling for security and more police.

People will do a lot to feel secure and have predictable lives.
 

mjb52

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5,994
This is all loosely from memory so I hope I'm not getting anything important wrong but I remember reading a quote after the Arab Spring about middle class women in Iran saying they look at what is happening in Syria and it makes them feel that opposing a dictator isn't really worth it. You would want to be able to point to better alternative examples, in which opposing a bad leader or a bad system brought people a good life. Tunisia seemed like one for awhile, but things don't seem to be going as well there now. But it may highlight that there have to be practical good effects of the ideal we want to promote around the world in people's lives in addition to the ideal itself. It's not always enough to just say "but this ideal is good."
 
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MacMadame

Doing all the things
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49,184
This. When the Yeltsin time changed to Putin time it took a long time for people to start protesting, even privately. And then they always added that this is better than chaos. A lot of Russians prefer autocracy to chaos and it has been so for centuries.
Not just Russians.

Not only do people want security over freedom, but they also don't seem to understand that true security can only happen if everyone is taken care of. They want to spend money on police instead of housing the homeless, for example. Even though the police want the homeless housed because it makes their jobs easier. And getting rid of a source of crime is more efficient, not just more humane.
 

skatingguy

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11,918
Not just Russians.

Not only do people want security over freedom, but they also don't seem to understand that true security can only happen if everyone is taken care of. They want to spend money on police instead of housing the homeless, for example. Even though the police want the homeless housed because it makes their jobs easier. And getting rid of a source of crime is more efficient, not just more humane.
It's sad, but we seem to pick security theatre over security every time.
 

Dobre

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12,807
Thread on how dental and medical procedures are being impacted by sanctions:


"In Russia, dental implants, crowns, dental drills were primarily imported from Germany. Russia ran out of all such consumables days ago."

"surgeons can no longer perform surgeries that involve prosthetics because they were all being imported from abroad. This includes but not limited to hip and knee surgeries."
 

Dobre

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12,807
Typically, food and medicine/medical needs items are exempt from sanctions. I didn’t realize those were also sanctioned this time.
Yes, I don't know if they are directly sanctioned. They are clearly being impacted. There is a link on the thread to the original source, probably in Russian. I do know that the Russian athletes often have medical procedures done in Germany, and that right now is probably not happening. Also, while many things are directly impacted by sanctions, other businesses have to be asking whether it's safe and financially feasible to continue business in Russia. I hope the dental and medical problems can be solved.
 

barbk

Well-Known Member
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7,505
Thread on how dental and medical procedures are being impacted by sanctions:


"In Russia, dental implants, crowns, dental drills were primarily imported from Germany. Russia ran out of all such consumables days ago."

"surgeons can no longer perform surgeries that involve prosthetics because they were all being imported from abroad. This includes but not limited to hip and knee surgeries."
I feel bad about this until I remember a maternity hospital, evacuation convoys, and schools in Ukraine bombed by Russia and communities without water. At that point, pretty hard to feel bad about Russians not getting dental implants, veneers and knee replacements.
 

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