Racial Profiling & Related Matters (Non-Lethal Version)

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
7,699

Sparks

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,034
ST. LOUIS (KMOV.com) -- A grand jury indicted Mark and Patricia McCloskey Tuesday on charges of exhibiting guns at protesters in a June incident in their neighborhood.

Additionally, the grand jury added a charge of tampering with evidence for both members of the couple.

 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
38,716
Here are two interesting articles that illustrate a lot about systemic racism in the US. The first is about George Floyd and the second is about kids who desegrated their schools and what happened to them:


 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
38,716
This article on White Supremacists talks a bit about how it is, at its heart, a men's movement because it comes from people thinking they are losing something they are entitled to and it's being given to people they don't think are entitled to it, like POC and women.

 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
7,699
It turns out Amy Cooper called 911 twice and during the second call claimed Chris Cooper was trying to assault her, which makes it more understandable why they decided to charge her.
In a previously unreported detail, Amy Cooper made a second call to 911 in which she falsely said that "an African American man 'tried to assault' her," according to a criminal complaint against her.

After police arrived at the scene, she backtracked and told an officer that the man did not try to assault her or touch her.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,755
Police in Philadelphia pulled a young mother and her nephew from the car, beat them and then used the 2-year-old son in a propaganda video. https://www.washingtonpost.com/nation/2020/10/30/philadelphia-fop-posts-toddler/

“This child was lost during the violent riots in Philadelphia, wandering around barefoot in an area that was experiencing complete lawlessness,” the union claimed in a tweet and Facebook post that have since been deleted. “The only thing this Philadelphia police officer cared about in that moment was protecting this child.”

But lawyers for the boy’s family say that story was a total fabrication.

...

She was driving back to their home, hoping the purring car engine would lull her young son to sleep, when she turned onto Chestnut Street, where police and protesters had collided. She found herself unexpectedly driving toward a line of police officers who told her to turn around, Mincey said. The young mother tried to make a three-point turn when a swarm of Philadelphia officers surrounded the SUV, shattered its windows and pulled Young and her 16-year-old nephew from the car, the video shows.

A now-viral video of the confrontation shows officers throw Young and the teenager to the ground and then grab the toddler from the back seat. The scene was captured by Aapril Rice, who watched it unfold from her rooftop and told the Philadelphia Inquirer that watching a police officer take the baby was “surreal” and “traumatic.”
 

Artistic Skaters

Drawing Figures
Messages
7,699
It's amazing they added to the unconscionable actions by having the nerve to announce (for totally political purposes) they were "protecting" the toddler from a negligent parent.

Waiting to see if the police will be charged with child abuse for this. The toddler had a knot on his head because the police hit him and the grandmother said he was sitting in glass in his car seat when she picked him up from the back of a police cruiser. The police weren't very concerned for his safety. The toddler also has a hearing disability and the police have not returned his hearing aid or informed the mother how to get it back. The nephew yanked out of the car is also a minor and was assaulted and injured by the police.

I can't imagine what their excuse is going to be about the threatening toddler belted into a car seat.
"But he had a weapon!" ? :rolleyes:
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
38,716
After the George Floyd murder and the Amy Cooper in Central Park incident, a bunch of us found each other through some town halls the police department put on and attended a School Board meeting where they were discussing the budget and the SRO (School Resource Officer) program in particular. During the public comment section of that agenda item, we asked the School Board to disband the SRO program. The Board debated this and this is when we found out that:
  • When the SIP started back in March, the Fremont Police Department (FPD) had unilaterally repurposed the SROs to be patrol officers with no input from the school district or notification to them. (In the meantime, vandalism rose on campus.)
  • The school board and the district staff in charge of the program had no idea if they were still being charged for their part of the program (it's a split fee, with the city paying about 2/3 and the district 1/3) or not!
The school board ultimately decided to study the program instead of removing it but also to reach out to FPD and make sure they weren't paying for it since they weren't getting it.

In the meantime, I was horrified. How could they have so little control over this program that they pay for? Well, I was soon to find out, it was worse than I ever imagined.

The board ended up settings up a task force (which I got appointed to) and I don't know what they were expecting but I'm pretty sure it's not what happened. We first split into 4 sub-committees so we could focus on different aspects. I was on the Campus Security and Interactions ones. There was also Mental Health and Data and later we had one to put together a survey of administration. We worked LIKE CRAZY. It was like having a FT job on top of my real FT job. I even took PTO to get our report out by the (very short) deadline. So did other people.

We talked to so many people, read so many articles, and requested data from the FPD on their SRO arrests. They never gave us the data, at least not with demographics attached. They said they didn't have time. But in the meantime, they spent over 200 hours making a marketing video about the program! (Yes, I was fairly livid over that.) We were able to find data anyway in spite of them and it was not good.

In the end, we found:
  • The district has no oversight of the program. The FPD controls it in every way. The program also has no measurable goals and is never assessed. The only assessment seems to be "Principals like it."
  • The entire program costs the City and School District a whopping $2.5 million dollars for which they get 6 SROs and a Sergeant to run them. That's it.
    • The district pays for only 3 of the SROs. But for that amount of money, they could put Mental Health interns from a city-run program into every school in the district full-time and have money left over. Or hire 6 mental health counselors, one for each HS to replace the 6 SROs
  • SROs are not supposed to be involved in school discipline per the contract between the district and FPD but they are routinely involved because they are considered "informal counselors."
    • In particular, the girls reported that several SROs are overly invested in enforcing the dress code on them. (Some of the SRO comments were quite inappropriate IMO.)
    • White students reported that their Black and brown friends got arrested for smoking weed when the white students did not.
  • SROs do not stop school shootings. They just don't. They don't seem to deter them either. The Washington Post had an excellent article about this where they looked at 200 (now 237) school shootings and found only 1 where an SRO took out the shooter. 4 of 5 most deadly school shootings took place in High Schools all of which had SROs.
  • SROs are used primarily for 5150s (involuntary psych holds) even though they are not trained mental health professionals.
    • They have put a student into a 5150 against the direct advice of her therapist.
    • They have escalated mental health situations that teachers and staff had de-escalated before the SRO showed up. They are not qualified to be counselors in any way, in fact, but are routinely used that way by cash-pressed schools.
  • They target Black and Brown students and students with disabilities.
    • Before we started researching, we knew about the National stats on how SROs in a school increase arrests of students, especially those in protected categories, but everyone tried to tell us that Fremont was exceptional. Well, it turns out we are: in the wrong direction!
    • Our stats are worse than the national averages. Now that the district knows this, btw, they have legal liability if they don't do something about it.
  • There are no policies for how the schools interact with law enforcement. No training for staff either. What training they do get seems to be along the lines of "how not to get sued" such as "What if I have to touch a student? How far can I go?" and stuff about how to question students without their parents being notified.
  • The district says it wants to use restorative practices (i.e., prevent instead of reacting after the fact) but there has been no training since 2018 and only limited adoption in a few pilot schools.
  • The majority of parents and students have no interactions with SROs and wouldn't know if they disappeared tomorrow.
  • Our student to staff ratios for all the mental health professionals is well below recommended ratios.
Our task force concluded that the program is not reformable. SROs do get cultural sensitivity training but still arrest the POC kids more, for example. Also, if you get SROs out of discipline and out of mental health issues, there really isn't enough for them to do. Stationing a cop on campus during school hours 5 days a week just in case there might be a school shooting makes no sense unless they do all these other things they are not trained to do and do poorly. And more training won't help because a police officer (a) is trained in criminality and sees the world through that lens and (b) will never have the kind of training that counselors, psychologists, school nurses, and other mental health professionals have.

We also had many, many, many recommendations for how to change interactions with law enforcement (because it's not like getting rid of the program will stop cops from coming on campus). We adapted our recommendations from the ACLU paper "The Right to be a Student."

So this is what I have to say to anyone who has a kid in a school with an SRO program: look into it!

You may think, as many in my town thought (and some still because they're in denial), that your program is different from the National averages. I would say most likely it is not. Even if your SROs don't arrest Black and brown kids and disabled kids and LGBTQ+ kids at higher rates than they exist in your student population, most likely having police officers on campus increases suspensions, explosions, and arrests and lowers graduation rates. They are hammers with not enough to do so they will go looking for nails. That's just human nature.

In the meantime, we have been working furiously to bring attention to our report and get people to the School Board meeting where they will decide on the fate of the program. We are getting endorsements of our recommendations from student and community organizations too. We want to make sure the Board knows people are watching. And also we want to educate the public as to what we found because I think most parents are totally in the dark about this stuff.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
38,716
Just want to post that we won! The Board voted 3-2 to remove the SRO program. They accepted our report and our recommendations as a whole, no watering down any of them.

This is actually pretty amazing because our Board is pretty conservative. But we were able to swing one of them.

The Chief of Police made this really deranged presentation at the Board Meeting (in violation of the Brown Act, if you want to get technical) where she acted the Task Force in a very personal way and was sort of threatening (i.e., if you don't keep SROs, we won't be able to serve your students) and so many people called her on both from the Board and from public comments. It turns out it also helped sway our swing voter!

Of course, now the real work begins. The new board is sworn in at the Dec meeting and then we'll have a 4-1 conservative Board. But it won't be that easy to undo what has been done and we'll just have to keep an eye on them.
 

demetriosj

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,947
Why did these "protestors" feel it was ok to "surround the car, tap, and pound on it"?

 

Sparks

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,034
He has been named. His name was Anthony Quinn Warner. He died in the explosion.
Theories are that he blamed 5G for things. He sounds like a QAnon person.
 

skatingguy

Golden Team
Messages
7,816
Maybe I'm forgetting about a particular incident, but is this a the first suicide bombing in the US?
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top
Do Not Sell My Personal Information