Political news from elsewhere

Vagabond

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The PR and media manager of Qarabağ FK called for the killing of all Armenians, old and young, before attempting to justify the Armenian genocide committed by Turkey.
:eek:

Armenians will see Ibrahimov's statements as confirmation of their worst fears.

Azerbaijanis, for their part, see the March Days of 1918, when Bolsheviks supported by the Armenian Revolutionary Federation killed about 12,000 Azeris and other Muslims as a genocide, but they seem to have little knowledge of either the September Days later that year, when Persia and its local Azeri supporters killed a similar number of Armenians in Baku. From what I could tell, neither the March nor the September Days is common knowledge in Azerbaijan, and the Azerbaijanis have little grasp of the difference in magnitude between the events of 1918 and the Armenian Genocide, in which 1.5 million Armenians died at the hands of the Ottoman Empire.
 

Vagabond

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Speaking at a news conference in the Kosovo capital, Pristina, Thaci said he was stepping down "to protect the integrity of the state."
🤔 Imagine an American President doing that!
 

ballettmaus

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Vagabond

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The United Nations helped mediate a truce in 1991, with the understanding that a referendum would be held to decide whether the people of Western Sahara would choose independence or integration with Morocco. That referendum has yet to take place, mostly because the two sides cannot settle on who makes up the Indigenous people of the territory and should therefore be permitted to participate in the vote.
More than 14,500 people have fled into neighboring Sudan, with the speed of new arrivals “overwhelming the current capacity to provide aid,” the U.N. refugee agency said on Friday.
Under the agreement, some 1,960 armed Russian service members and 90 armored vehicles will deploy for at least five years to guard the line of contact between Armenian and Azerbaijani forces in the region and along the road connecting Armenian-controlled Nagorno-Karabakh to Armenia. Azerbaijan retained control of the hilltop town of Shusha, a place of historic and strategic significance to both countries, which it captured in recent days.
This is what the world gets from having the United States be so uninvolved in international affairs. January 20 cannot arrive too soon.
 

caseyedwards

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This is what the world gets from having the United States be so uninvolved in international affairs. January 20 cannot arrive too soon.
Well based on recent US history no good would have come from US involvement!! Lol
 

DORISPULASKI

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Sounds like he is sort of the Peruvian version of Biden

Sagasti’s reputation as a consensus builder makes him an apt choice for the moment, said Michael Shifter, who is head of the Inter-American Dialogue think tank and knows the new president.

“He always had ideas about trying to build bridges in Peru,” Shifter said. “That’s what he really stood for.”

The 76-year-old centrist lawmaker...
 

MacMadame

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Wasn't sure where to put this.


I'm glad they made this documentary. There aren't a lot of people left who lived through WWII and Nazi-denial is on the rise. Perhaps seeing real people talk about real events will help.
 

Vagabond

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The protests are directed at the king, the monarchy, the lèse-majesté law, and the entire system of government.

It doesn't sound like the protesters will back down easily; the king has only been fanning the flames.
 

Vagabond

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Shoko Arai, the only female assembly member in the town of Kusatsu, which is northwest of Tokyo, was ousted after the mayor and other assembly members, having tried and failed to remove her once already, orchestrated a recall election on Sunday....

“This is a very, very typical Japanese reaction against female victim-survivors,” said Hiroko Goto, an expert in law and gender at Chiba University.
:mad:
 

ballettmaus

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Much ado about nothing - click bait headline.
They violated the rules, sure, but that rule reminds me a little bit of All Lives Matter. We don't have a problem with having enough men in senior positions, they've been in those positions for centuries. And if they only hold 30% of those positions for a couple of years, they'll survive.
It's different for women though, so I think that rule should be that there can't be more than 60% of men in those positions. They can have their "of any gender" rule once we've had women-only cabinets etc for as long as we've had men-only cabinets.
 

skatingguy

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They violated the rules, sure, but that rule reminds me a little bit of All Lives Matter. We don't have a problem with having enough men in senior positions, they've been in those positions for centuries. And if they only hold 30% of those positions for a couple of years, they'll survive.
It's different for women though, so I think that rule should be that there can't be more than 60% of men in those positions. They can have their "of any gender" rule once we've had women-only cabinets etc for as long as we've had men-only cabinets.
The reason that this story is much ado about nothing is that the law was ridiculous, and has already been repealed.
 

Vagabond

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MOSCOW — A populist politician and convicted kidnapper won a landslide victory on Sunday in a snap presidential election in Kyrgyzstan triggered by a popular uprising against the previous government.

Sadyr Japarov, the winning candidate, got nearly 80 percent of the vote, according to the central electoral commission of the mountainous country, the only democracy in Central Asia. More than 80 percent of voters also supported Mr. Japarov’s proposal to redistribute political power away from Parliament and into the president’s hands.

In September, Mr. Japarov, 52, was still in jail, serving a lengthy term for orchestrating the kidnapping of a provincial governor, a charge he denounced as politically motivated. A violent upheaval that erupted in October over a disputed parliamentary election sprung Mr. Japarov from a prison cell to the prime minister’s chair.

A few days later, he assumed the interim presidency before resigning to run for that office. The country’s main investigative body quickly canceled Mr. Japarov’s conviction.

Reviled by his critics as a corrupt nationalist with links to organized crime, Mr. Japarov tried to consolidate society behind his campaign. There were scattered reports of voting irregularities as of late Sunday, when the election authorities said turnout was around 39 percent.

On Sunday night at a news conference in the capital, Bishkek, he said Kyrgyzstan needs political stability now most of all.
“I call on all opponents to unite; the minority should submit to the majority,” Mr. Japarov said during the news conference. “I come to power during challenging times; there is a crisis everywhere.”
There was a time, not so long ago, when I would wish that a country like Kyrgystan would hold itself to the same standards as America does. It appears, however, that Kyrgyzstan has not only met those standards but even exceeded them. :(
 
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