Political news from elsewhere

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
12,822

Buzz

Well-Known Member
Messages
32,514

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
22,056

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,692
Good for Canada. And especially good for Ms. al-Qunun - what a brave and forward-thinking young woman! May she serve as an example to other Saudi women that oppression can be fought.
She's a small part of a much larger trend.

Saudi Women, Tired of Restraints, Find Ways to Flee

The phenomenon of women trying to flee Saudi Arabia is not new, coming to the world’s attention as early as the 1970s, when a Saudi princess was caught trying to flee the kingdom with her lover. The couple were tried for adultery and executed.

But the number of young women considering and taking the enormous risk to flee Saudi Arabia appears to have grown in recent years, rights groups say, as women frustrated by social and legal constraints at home turn to social media to help plan, and sometimes document, their efforts to escape.
 

rvi5

Well-Known Member
Messages
815
Good for Canada. And especially good for Ms. al-Qunun - what a brave and forward-thinking young woman! May she serve as an example to other Saudi women that oppression can be fought.
Certainly brave.

She renounced Islam, which is punishable by death. I suspect she was burning bridges behind her, guaranteeing she must be recognized as a refugee. Otherwise, she could be portrayed as just a spoiled teenager running away from home. Indeed, that is how her parents and the Saudi government responded. She doesn’t appear dumb, hence she must have been desperate to take such dire risks.
 
Last edited:

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
22,056
She renounced Islam, which is punishable by death. I suspect she was burning bridges behind her, guaranteeing she must be recognized as a refugee. Otherwise, she could be portrayed as just a spoiled teenager running away from home. Indeed, that is how her parents and the Saudi government responded. She doesn’t appear dumb, hence she must have been desperate to take such dire risks.
I'm sure she was desperate to escape the tyranny and danger of her family, but she also had to have much determination and courage.

First of, she was able to identify oppression for what it is in a country where it is normalized and many women just accept it. Then she took flight when she got a chance, uncertain of the outcome and not knowing where she was going, or if she was going anywhere at all. And knowing that if she failed to escape the KSA, torture and death would probably be the punishment.

Then she had the presence of mind to reach out and ask for what she wanted on social media.

And she's just 18! :cheer2:

She's a small part of a much larger trend.

Saudi Women, Tired of Restraints, Find Ways to Flee
I'd like to see the women of the Middle East rise up on mass in my lifetime - and think know it might just happen (I'm 60 now). Political activism tends to take more covert forms in authoritarian regimes.

Nonetheless, these stories are heartening.

I loved the response of this Middle Eastern woman:

https://www.sbs.com.au/news/rahaf-al-qunun-is-going-to-start-a-revolution-teen-s-plight-highlights-saudi-male-guardianship
 
Last edited:

rvi5

Well-Known Member
Messages
815
Rahaf Mohammed al-Qunon update. According to another article I read previously, she is being housed at an undisclosed temporary location under the care of COSTI. For now, she is being accompanied by COSTI staff when she wishes to go outside. Apparently, a BC activist friend on the internet had created a GoFundMe page which had collected $11,000 in 24 hours...

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saudi-teen-fled-thailand-canada-1.4977664
 
Last edited:

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
22,056
"What happens the next time a teenage girl or adult woman from Saudi Arabia flees her family and declares herself to no longer be a Muslim, does that mean automatic sanctuary?" In Saudi Arabia, leaving Islam is treated as a crime punishable by death.
:wall:

If women's rights are human rights and human rights are women's rights, and women are escaping oppression, then sanctuary should be automatic insofar as that is allowed - providing the woman passes screening protocols.

"That's the biggest risk of power being exercised in a way that prioritizes some refugees versus others," she said.
Unfortunately some refugees are going to get priority. Why not women who are oppressed and in danger?

A high percentage of oppressed women in the world have neither the will nor the wherewithall to escape their circumstances. Not being allowed to travel without a man's permission would prevent many such women from even considering escape. Rahav was uncommonly clever and brave.

Many men are undeniably in need of asylum as well as women. But women are uniquely vulnerable. For example, I'm sure boys/men get raped in refugee camps, but don't think it is as routinely as women. And men have a strength advantage against other men who might harm them, whereas women do not.
 
Last edited:

rvi5

Well-Known Member
Messages
815
The reason given for Rahaf being sent to Canada, was due to the death threats received. I would think Thai police would have her under constant police guard to ensure she doesn’t wander off, or anyone harms her while in their custody. Why the rush to get her to Canada instead of Australia? Especially since Canada was acting behind the scene, keeping a low profile up to that point.

I wonder if the Saudis were preparing a criminal arrest warrant against her, giving the Thai police a reason to keep her in the country until they can get at her for deportation. Isn’t that what Bahrain did with the soccer player given permanent residency by Australia? He is still being held in Thailand, despite complaints from Australia. If inside information about a plan were leaked to the UNHCR, it would suddenly become critically urgent to get Rahaf out of Thailand ASAP before the Saudis get the ball rolling. The UNHCR would need a country willing to make an exception to it’s normal rules to get her out immediately. ...Just my conspiracy theory.

Whatever the urgent reason, should Canada have turned their back on her to avoid the risk of setting a precedent?
 
Last edited:

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
22,056
The reason given for Rahaf being sent to Canada, was due to the death threats received. I would think Thai police would have her under constant police guard to ensure she doesn’t wander off, or anyone harms her while in their custody. Why the rush to get her to Canada instead of Australia? Especially since Canada was acting behind the scene, keeping a low profile up to that point.


SFAIK, Canada expedited the process very quickly. It would have taken longer for her to get asylum in Australia.

I wonder if the Saudis were preparing a criminal arrest warrant against her, giving the Thai police a reason to keep her in the country until they can get at her for deportation.

It wouldn't surprise me. Rahaf violated Saudi law by traveling without the permission of her guardian.


Whatever the urgent reason, should Canada have turned their back on her to avoid the risk of setting a precedence?
No.

Trudeau has identified as a feminist and women's rights have been at the foreground of his agenda. For example, he focused on girls and women in his African tour.

And he should continue to stand up for women's rights and do what he can to help refugee women.

By the way, you should change 'precedence' to 'precedent'.
 

rvi5

Well-Known Member
Messages
815
I kept thinking there must have been a very urgent reason why Canada suddenly stepped out of the shadows into the spotlight after trying to remain inconspicuous. According to the Human Rights Watch, Canada played a major “behind the scene” role in getting Thailand to not deport Rahaf. But that had never been mentioned in early news reports. Later the head of the Thai immigration police mentioned to CNN, both Australia and Canada offered to take Rahaf. He later tried to retract the comment, but it was too late. Australia had already mentioned they would likely take Rahaf, so it seemed Canada didn’t wish to be openly identified. I assumed they didn’t want to worsen the already damaged relationship with the Saudis unless it became necessary. Suddenly everything reversed. Since the Thai police would have provided security, the internet threats alone didn’t seem a sufficient explanation for the sudden urgency to get Rahaf out of Thailand quickly.




Correction done, thanks.
 
Last edited:

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 1, Guests: 4)

Top