News & Experiences continued

sk9tingfan

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And now, the resurgence of Polio is being detected in the sewage water in London! In the early seventies when I was working as a rehab nurse, we were trying to help those who survived and were seeing the aftereffects of the virus due to post-polio syndrome. Some patients' trunk muscles were so compromised that orthopedic surgeons were inserting steel rods into their spines so they would not collapse. Without them, their chests would collapse, thereby suffocating the patients. This and other manifestations were the reason behind my becoming so upset when people poo-pooed this pandemic. Not to be so pessimistic, but I'm worried that we have yet to see the downstream impacts of this more recent virus.

We also thought that polio was a thing of the past until one of our residents who came from Brazil reported still caring for a polio-affected population.


 

Judy

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And now, the resurgence of Polio is being detected in the sewage water in London! In the early seventies when I was working as a rehab nurse, we were trying to help those who survived and were seeing the aftereffects of the virus due to post-polio syndrome. Some patients' trunk muscles were so compromised that orthopedic surgeons were inserting steel rods into their spines so they would not collapse. Without them, their chests would collapse, thereby suffocating the patients. This and other manifestations were the reason behind my becoming so upset when people poo-pooed this pandemic. Not to be so pessimistic, but I'm worried that we have yet to see the downstream impacts of this more recent virus.

We also thought that polio was a thing of the past until one of our residents who came from Brazil reported still caring for a polio-affected population.


Wow really? My former mother-in-law told me she had polio although not a serious case. She had her baby toe adhered to the next toe. Unfortunately we got interrupted and I kept forgetting to ask her later on about it.

London though 😳.
 

sk9tingfan

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Wow really? My former mother-in-law told me she had polio although not a serious case. She had her baby toe adhered to the next toe. Unfortunately we got interrupted and I kept forgetting to ask her later on about it.

London though 😳.
The cases I've referenced were among the most extreme. An ex of mine had both upper and lower extremity manifestations that partially got in the way of mobility/functionality, but not terrible. The worst obviously are those patients who were on iron lungs and later were on respirators.
 

once_upon

Enough
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Polio was (is) kind of like Covid. It's a crap shoot as to how it affect someone.

Like the 3 month old I took care who got polio from the activated polio vaccine (early 80's when activated polio vaccines were still used). She died. To our friend who had polio in the mid 1950's who has significant leg issues to people who slight cases, no issues. Or like the man who.has been in an iron lung for 70 years https://www.kake.com/story/46350238...n-is-one-of-the-last-people-with-an-iron-lung

Just like any communicable disease, you are less than 24 hours away from being potentially infected.
 

Judy

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Polio was (is) kind of like Covid. It's a crap shoot as to how it affect someone.

Like the 3 month old I took care who got polio from the activated polio vaccine (early 80's when activated polio vaccines were still used). She died. To our friend who had polio in the mid 1950's who has significant leg issues to people who slight cases, no issues. Or like the man who.has been in an iron lung for 70 years https://www.kake.com/story/46350238...n-is-one-of-the-last-people-with-an-iron-lung

Just like any communicable disease, you are less than 24 hours away from being potentially infected.
Wow that’s an incredible story. 😢 to the three month old.
 

Dobre

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Case numbers and hospitalizations in Oregon were both plateaued for several weeks, but since mid-June hospitalizations have suddenly leaped up from 300 to 400. Cases have gone up a bit over the same time period, but not earlier & not on as obvious or as steep a climb. (I'm wondering if the hospitalization climb is due to the outbreak moving to less-vaccinated counties).

Omicron BA.4 has also been emerging during this time. Could be that.
 

Susan1

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Susan1

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(I forgot till I turned on the 4:00 news) 4 of the counties, including mine, that are the highest are right next to each other. And one day this week, the first story was about how they don't know how many people actually have "it" because people don't turn in their tests results and they aren't always reliable because people don't do it right. The story right after that was that Greene county was giving away free tests. Alrighty then.
 

MacMadame

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I mentioned my county had re-instituted a mask mandate when no other county in the state had one and the numbers didn't really support it. Well, it lasted all of three weeks! :lol: The county overreacted to a blip in the number IMO and with numbers dropping all over, they couldn't justify it.
 

Susan1

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New York City will offer Paxlovid at mobile testing sites, a first in the U.S​

 

Susan1

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Wright Patterson Air Force Base has gone back up to yellow health protection level.

ETA - They refer to it as "Bravo" since it's military, but the level was yellow on the chart (remember the state maps?). :)
 
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Dobre

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"In the 2020 period, COVID-19 was the second leading cause of death in people aged 85 and over, but, amid high vaccine uptake in this age group, it fell to the third leading cause of death from January to October 2021.

Younger adults saw the opposite trend. For those aged 45 to 54, COVID-19 was the fourth leading cause of death in the 2020 period but jumped to the leading cause of death in 2021. Likewise, in those aged 35 to 44, COVID-19 jumped from the fifth leading cause of death in 2020 to the second leading cause in 2021. And for those aged 15 to 24 and 25 to 34, COVID-19 wasn't in the top five in 2020, but ranked as the fourth leading cause of death in both age groups in 2021.

For those aged 55 to 84, COVID-19 was the third leading cause of death in both time periods."
 

sk8pics

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So my piano teacher was away on a cruise on vacation. I think they got back yesterday or maybe the day before. Today she sends out an email saying she’s home and she had a cold “while we were away” and so TODAY she did an at home Covid test and was positive. She says it’s either 8 or 9 days since she had symptoms, so she thinks tomorrow would be her day 10.

I can’t believe she spent all that time on a cruise ship with “a cold” and flew back without bothering to check whether she was positive. :eek: :wall: :mad: All those people at risk because, I guess, she didn’t want to risk finding out she had it and not being able to fly herself.

I don’t have a lesson scheduled this week. My next one would be next Tuesday. I was going to skip my lesson the week after that because it’s right before I have a trip, and I do not want any unnecessary exposure risks right before, because they are going to test us at the symposium I’m going to, and it would royally suck to get there and test positive. So I’m thinking of skipping next Tuesday too, which is too bad. But now I feel like I can’t trust her to do the right thing and cancel if she should not be teaching.

And no, I didn’t take a test before I came home from my own international trip because I had absolutely no symptoms. I did test when I came home and tested negative twice, so I’m confident I was not sick while I was traveling. I can’t imagine how she can rationalize not testing when she was sick. Her husband is exceedingly cheap and I’m guessing he wouldn’t let her, for fear that she would test positive and be stuck.
 

Louis

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All those people at risk because, I guess, she didn’t want to risk finding out she had it and not being able to fly herself.

Curious - is there any legal requirement not to fly if Covid positive? There are no laws in the UK, and Covid-positive people can get on planes the same as anyone else. I work with someone who tested positive while abroad and flew home while symptomatic :shuffle:. (They did wear a mask.) I read the CDC guidance, which is wordy and seems to boil down to judgment.
 

sk8pics

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Curious - is there any legal requirement not to fly if Covid positive? There are no laws in the UK, and Covid-positive people can get on planes the same as anyone else. I work with someone who tested positive while abroad and flew home while symptomatic :shuffle:. (They did wear a mask.) I read the CDC guidance, which is wordy and seems to boil down to judgment.
CDC guidelines say DON'T TRAVEL if you are sick. You are right, they're wordy. But it says very clearly, IIRC, DON'T TRAVEL.

These days, if you're having symptoms, I think it is unethical to travel without at least checking if you have Covid. She probably wore a mask, I hope anyway. I would have faced the same issue if I'd tested positive while I was in Ireland, but if I had been having symptoms I would have tested, and if I tested positive I would not have flown. It's not clear to me if she tested while she was abroad or not. Regardless, she's still positive 8 days after her initial symptoms, which suggests she has a significant viral load, I think.

 

MacMadame

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CDC guidelines say DON'T TRAVEL if you are sick. You are right, they're wordy. But it says very clearly, IIRC, DON'T TRAVEL.
I think something Covid has shined a light on is that many people do things when they are sick that they shouldn't. Like coming to work, traveling, anything where staying home invokes a penalty (lost wages, lost money, boss getting mad at you).
 

flyingsit

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CDC guidelines say DON'T TRAVEL if you are sick. You are right, they're wordy. But it says very clearly, IIRC, DON'T TRAVEL.

These days, if you're having symptoms, I think it is unethical to travel without at least checking if you have Covid. She probably wore a mask, I hope anyway. I would have faced the same issue if I'd tested positive while I was in Ireland, but if I had been having symptoms I would have tested, and if I tested positive I would not have flown. It's not clear to me if she tested while she was abroad or not. Regardless, she's still positive 8 days after her initial symptoms, which suggests she has a significant viral load, I think.

Most airlines also ask you to certify that you don’t have symptoms during the online checkin process too.
 

moebius

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Who wants to travel anymore when you can't be sick? I always get sick when I travel. I guess I won't be giving my hard earned money to other countries/states and airlines if these rules persist which I think is forever.
 

MacMadame

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Who wants to travel anymore when you can't be sick? I always get sick when I travel. I guess I won't be giving my hard earned money to other countries/states and airlines if these rules persist which I think is forever.
What rules? We just had 3 people tell stories of people who flew while sick.
 

Miezekatze

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I think something Covid has shined a light on is that many people do things when they are sick that they shouldn't. Like coming to work, traveling, anything where staying home invokes a penalty (lost wages, lost money, boss getting mad at you).
I don't know but here in Europe a hotel room costs about 100 euros per night. A flight might by several hundred euros or over thousands when it's a long flight.

Even if you get a normal cold, you might have cold symptoms for 5 to 10 days. So if your vacation ends you'd have to invest 500 to 1000 euros for a hotel room. Plus buy a new flight home.

So you'd have to spend something like 1000 to 2000 euros extra even as a single person, which would mean only millionaires would ever get to travel.
Now imagine you are family of 4 or 5 and one kid gets a cold on vacation.

Personally I suspect that 99% of people who say they wouldn't travel sick, haven't gotten sick on vacation yet and put the plan in practice.

For example in August I am on a 3 day trip to Munich and I can sleep at a friends. Because she has no AC and her flat gets very very hot in summer, I got a bit of panic and thought about switching to a hotel room. But because of the event we are attending there, the hotels room are 99% booked out and the remaining ones cost something like 600 - 700 Euros for 2 nights. So i decided I'll just sweat and not sleep. Obviously if i had a hotel room and got sick, I could not afford an additional hotel room for 5 - 10 days. So I can't say I find it all that credible that everybody here would instantly stay for another 5-10 days if they get any symptomatic disease at any place they might have travelled too (it might actually be easier with Covid than with other symptomatic illnesses, because with Covid at least there are insurances that might help you in such situation but with a regular cold it's your problem all alone).

I think it's naive to think that most people who travel by train or airplane are not going to travel home when catching something.

Also even with covid, rules differ immensely. In Spain people under 60 who have only light symptoms don't have to isolate anymore for example. So they might not think about traveling with light covid. Same for Switzerland. So realistically I think people should just mask or avoid flying or trains if they are worried ,because I think the likeliness of positive person on any public transport is very high.
 
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sk8pics

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@Miezekatze I get what you are saying. I am sure many people fly with colds, as they always have. There is more risk with Covid. I hope I would not fly if I thought I had covid and would confirm it, or not, with a test before getting on a plane, especially for a long flight. This is also one reason I bought trip insurance that included covid coverage, because I would not want to have to pay to stay in a hotel for another week or so. I didn’t even sneeze once while I was on my trip, so did not use one of the tests I had with me. The person I mentioned had to have known she was sick, and she was still positive 8 days later on a rapid at home antigen test. That sounds like she was probably quite contagious while she was traveling. She was pretty careful all this time because she has young grandchildren who couldn’t be vaccinated. Now she took that choice to be careful or not away from those who were seated near her on the plane. Yes, we all can choose whether to travel or not, but if you know you are sick with a potentially serious illness, it’s wrong to travel. I know this person could have afforded a longer stay, too.
 

MacMadame

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I agree @Miezekatze that your example is one reason why people do it.

If we want people to stop coming to work with the flu or travel with covid, we need to make it easier for them to do this and change the culture so that doing things like masking when sick is the norm.

Mini-Mac got covid while working and her business gave her "covid pay" while she was out. That is the sort of thing that has to happen if we want lower waged workers to not come to work. Salaried people who could wfh who come into the office anyway are another story. That is about culture, not about losing money you can't afford.

Not sure I count colds in this, btw, because most people have mild symptoms with those and colds don't kill people*. A simple mask while having one should be sufficient.

I do think that, if you are going to travel, you should think ahead of time about what you will do if you are exposed to Covid, have symptoms of covid, etc., and have a plan. At least bring anti-gen tests with you. (I've been caught out with that one -- had a close contact notification and no way to test since PCR tests were not schedulable until I was home anyway and antigen tests impossible to find.)

*I know it's happened but it's something like 1 person every couple of years and there were extenuating circumstances.
 

Dobre

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What the BA.5 Subvariant Could Mean for the United States​


"The most transmissible variant yet of the coronavirus is threatening a fresh wave of infections in the United States, even among those who have recovered from the virus fairly recently.

The subvariant of Omicron known as BA.5 is now dominant, according to federal estimates released Tuesday, and together with BA.4, another subvariant, it is fueling an outbreak of cases and hospitalizations.

Though the popularity of home testing means reported cases are a significant undercount of the true infection rate, the share of tests that come back positive is shooting upward and is now higher than during most other waves of the pandemic. According to the C.D.C., the risk from Covid-19 is increasing in much of the country.

BA.5 and BA.4, both subvariants of the Omicron variant that swept the world during the winter, are the most capable versions of the virus yet at evading immunity from previous infections and vaccines. Both variants have mutations in their spike proteins that are different enough from earlier versions of the virus that they are able to dodge some antibodies."
 

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