News & Experiences continued

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,135
Umatilla County is on its second spike with Delta.

It was purple, then down to brick red, then down to lighter red, then orange for a whole day, now back up to brick red.

This was totally predictable with their holding the Pendleton Roundup.
 

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,698
I just spoke to a woman who has been in the hospital for three weeks with IT. She and her husband were both vaccinated (Pfizer) and he brought IT home from work and gave it to her. He was sick but was able to remain at home. She went to the hospital and was unable to speak for two weeks....she was just trying to draw breath. Today she struggled to talk to me but I think she was glad of some conversation. She sounds terrible and said her upper lungs are clearing but her lower lungs are have worsened. I've now talked to a number of people with IT and this doesn't sound like someone with the flu. When I hear them breath it makes me think they have glass in their lungs. She said a number of people in the hospital with her have had the vaccine.
 

Orm Irian

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,261
this doesn't sound like someone with the flu. When I hear them breath it makes me think they have glass in their lungs.
That's actually what they call it in the images of the lungs of people with C-9 - ground-glass opacity. The lungs just look like a big white mass of slivers on the image. The damage this thing does to your lungs can be worse than smoking or pneumonia, so I'm not surprised the woman you spoke to was having trouble breathing and speaking. I hope she gets better quickly and doesn't have any lasting troubles from it.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,462
CV 19 remains a disease of politics and geography.

Today's NY Times email discusses the political ramifications of choosing not to be vaccinated. Since it's an email, there is no article to link to. I will be quoting a great deal of it:

During the early months of *********-19 vaccinations, several major demographic groups lagged in receiving shots, including Black Americans, Latino Americans and Republican voters.​
More recently, the racial gaps — while still existing — have narrowed. The partisan gap, however, continues to be enormous. A Pew Research Center poll last month found that 86 percent of Democratic voters had received at least one shot, compared with 60 percent of Republican voters.​
The political divide over vaccinations is so large that almost every reliably blue state now has a higher vaccination rate than almost every reliably red state...
Because the vaccines are so effective at preventing serious illness, ********* deaths are also showing a partisan pattern. ********* is still a national crisis, but the worst forms of it are increasingly concentrated in red America.
It’s worth remembering that ********* followed a different pattern for more than a year after its arrival in the U.S. Despite widespread differences in mask wearing — and scientific research suggesting that masks reduce the *****’s spread — the ********* was if anything worse in blue regions. Masks evidently were not powerful enough to overcome other regional differences, like the amount of international travel that flows through major metro areas, which tend to be politically liberal.​
Vaccination has changed the situation. The vaccines are powerful enough to overwhelm other differences between blue and red areas.​
Some left-leaning communities — like many suburbs of New York, San Francisco and Washington, as well as much of New England — have such high vaccination rates that even the unvaccinated are partly protected by the low number of cases. Conservative communities, on the other hand, have been walloped by the highly contagious Delta variant. (You can find data for hundreds of counties here.)​
Since Delta began circulating widely in the U.S., ********* has exacted a horrific death toll on red America: In counties where Donald Trump received at least 70 percent of the vote, the ***** has killed about 47 out of every 100,000 people since the end of June, according to Charles Gaba, a health care analyst. In counties where Trump won less than 32 percent of the vote, the number is about 10 out of 100,000.
Some of the vaccination gap stems from the libertarian instincts of many Republicans. “They understand freedom as being left alone to make their own choices, and they resent being told what to do,” William Galston has written in The Wall Street Journal.​
But philosophy is only a partial explanation. In much of the rest of the world, vaccine attitudes do not break down along right-left lines, and some conservative leaders have responded effectively to *********. So have a few Republican governors in the U.S. “It didn’t have to be this way,” German Lopez of Vox has written.​
What distinguishes the U.S. is a conservative party — the Republican Party — that has grown hostile to science and empirical evidence in recent decades. A conservative media complex, including Fox News, Sinclair Broadcast Group and various online outlets, echoes and amplifies this hostility. Trump took the conspiratorial thinking to a new level, but he did not create it.​
“With very little resistance from party leaders,” my colleague Lisa Lerer wrote this summer, many Republicans “have elevated falsehoods and doubts about vaccinations from the fringes of American life to the center of our political conversation.”
With the death count rising, at least a few Republicans appear to be worried about what their party and its allies have sown.​
In an article this month for Breitbart, the right-wing website formerly run by Steve Bannon, John Nolte argued that the partisan gap in vaccination rates was part of a liberal plot. Liberals like Biden, Nancy Pelosi, Anthony Fauci and Howard Stern have tried so hard to persuade people to get vaccinated, because they know that Republican voters will do the opposite of whatever they say, Nolte wrote.​
His argument is certainly bizarre, given that Democratic politicians have been imploring all Americans to get vaccinated and many Republican politicians have not. But Nolte did offer a glimpse at a creeping political fear among some Republicans. “Right now, a countless number of Trump supporters believe they are owning the left by refusing to take a lifesaving vaccine,” Nolte wrote. “In a country where elections are decided on razor-thin margins, does it not benefit one side if their opponents simply drop dead?”
How might more conservative Americans be persuaded to get vaccinated?​
One intriguing anecdote involves the football team at the University of Mississippi, which is entirely vaccinated even though the state has one of the nation’s lowest vaccination rates. Coaches there emphasized the tangible, short-term costs of getting *********, rather than the more remote chance of death: The players might have to miss a game, and the team might have to forfeit it, if they tested positive.​
A related message is duty, Timothy Carney has written in The Washington Examiner. If Carney had refused to get vaccinated, he explained, he would have risked loading more work onto his wife, his colleagues and his partner in teaching Sunday school, as well as forced his children to miss school.​
In The Atlantic, Olga Khazan has argued that fear remains the best motivator, based on her interviews with Tucker Carlson viewers who nonetheless have been vaccinated. And Daniel Darling, an evangelical author, has said that one-on-one conversations encouraging conservatives to talk with their doctors will have more success than any top-down campaign.​
Then again, Darling’s message also shows why the vaccination gap exists in the first place. After he wrote an op-ed in USA Today about his decision to get vaccinated, Darling’s employer — NRB, an association of Christian broadcasters — fired him.​
 

Cachoo

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,698
several major demographic groups lagged in receiving shots, including Black Americans, Latino Americans and Republican voters. That line sounds so weird to me...you don't usually see these groups together.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,462
several major demographic groups lagged in receiving shots, including Black Americans, Latino Americans and Republican voters. That line sounds so weird to me...you don't usually see these groups together.
They are groups less likely to have completed college.

The last Pew survey I saw indicated that Catholic Latino Americans were next highest after atheists in vaccination rates:

Vaccination patterns vary considerably among major U.S. religious groups. Around eight-in-ten Catholic adults (82%) said they were at least partially vaccinated as of August – a figure that included 86% of Hispanic Catholics and 79% of White Catholics. Among Protestants, 73% of White non-evangelicals and 70% of those who are Black said they had received at least dose, but the share was considerably lower among White evangelical Protestants (57%).

When it comes to religiously unaffiliated Americans, three-quarters said they were at least partially vaccinated as of August. But there were differences within this group too: Nine-in-ten atheists said they had received at least one dose, compared with somewhat smaller shares of agnostics (84%) and those who describe their religion as “nothing in particular” (69%).
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,462
CV 19 hits Dancing With The Stars.

Cheryl Burke shared some difficult news with her fans. The pro dancer revealed that she's tested positive for *********-19 one day before the new episode of Dancing With the Stars...

Burke adds that she's "fully vaccinated" and that she feels worried she won't be able to perform her number with her partner, Cody Rigsby, on Monday's new episode.

The video continues in the afternoon, still in Burke's car, and she reveals, "I have really bad news. I am positive, which means I have *********."

Burke begins to tear up as she explains how she's been "feeling progressively worse" throughout the day, while waiting for the results.

"I feel so bad. I feel so bad for Cody, I feel like I'm letting him down. I just feel like s**t and it's so overwhelming," Burke says while fighting back tears. "It's Sunday and the show's tomorrow.... I just hope I didn't spread it."

"For those of you who don't think ********* is a real thing, it's f**king real. I have to quarantine for 10 days, I've been ordered to stay home," she continues. "I can't believe this happened."
 

Tavi

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,093
CV 19 remains a disease of politics and geography.

Today's NY Times email discusses the political ramifications of choosing not to be vaccinated. Since it's an email, there is no article to link to. I will be quoting a great deal of it:

During the early months of *********-19 vaccinations, several major demographic groups lagged in receiving shots, including Black Americans, Latino Americans and Republican voters.​
More recently, the racial gaps — while still existing — have narrowed. The partisan gap, however, continues to be enormous. A Pew Research Center poll last month found that 86 percent of Democratic voters had received at least one shot, compared with 60 percent of Republican voters.​
The political divide over vaccinations is so large that almost every reliably blue state now has a higher vaccination rate than almost every reliably red state...​
Because the vaccines are so effective at preventing serious illness, ********* deaths are also showing a partisan pattern. ********* is still a national crisis, but the worst forms of it are increasingly concentrated in red America.​
It’s worth remembering that ********* followed a different pattern for more than a year after its arrival in the U.S. Despite widespread differences in mask wearing — and scientific research suggesting that masks reduce the *****’s spread — the ********* was if anything worse in blue regions. Masks evidently were not powerful enough to overcome other regional differences, like the amount of international travel that flows through major metro areas, which tend to be politically liberal.​
Vaccination has changed the situation. The vaccines are powerful enough to overwhelm other differences between blue and red areas.​
Some left-leaning communities — like many suburbs of New York, San Francisco and Washington, as well as much of New England — have such high vaccination rates that even the unvaccinated are partly protected by the low number of cases. Conservative communities, on the other hand, have been walloped by the highly contagious Delta variant. (You can find data for hundreds of counties here.)​
Since Delta began circulating widely in the U.S., ********* has exacted a horrific death toll on red America: In counties where Donald Trump received at least 70 percent of the vote, the ***** has killed about 47 out of every 100,000 people since the end of June, according to Charles Gaba, a health care analyst. In counties where Trump won less than 32 percent of the vote, the number is about 10 out of 100,000.​
Some of the vaccination gap stems from the libertarian instincts of many Republicans. “They understand freedom as being left alone to make their own choices, and they resent being told what to do,” William Galston has written in The Wall Street Journal.​
But philosophy is only a partial explanation. In much of the rest of the world, vaccine attitudes do not break down along right-left lines, and some conservative leaders have responded effectively to *********. So have a few Republican governors in the U.S. “It didn’t have to be this way,” German Lopez of Vox has written.​
What distinguishes the U.S. is a conservative party — the Republican Party — that has grown hostile to science and empirical evidence in recent decades. A conservative media complex, including Fox News, Sinclair Broadcast Group and various online outlets, echoes and amplifies this hostility. Trump took the conspiratorial thinking to a new level, but he did not create it.​
“With very little resistance from party leaders,” my colleague Lisa Lerer wrote this summer, many Republicans “have elevated falsehoods and doubts about vaccinations from the fringes of American life to the center of our political conversation.”​
With the death count rising, at least a few Republicans appear to be worried about what their party and its allies have sown.​
In an article this month for Breitbart, the right-wing website formerly run by Steve Bannon, John Nolte argued that the partisan gap in vaccination rates was part of a liberal plot. Liberals like Biden, Nancy Pelosi, Anthony Fauci and Howard Stern have tried so hard to persuade people to get vaccinated, because they know that Republican voters will do the opposite of whatever they say, Nolte wrote.​
His argument is certainly bizarre, given that Democratic politicians have been imploring all Americans to get vaccinated and many Republican politicians have not. But Nolte did offer a glimpse at a creeping political fear among some Republicans. “Right now, a countless number of Trump supporters believe they are owning the left by refusing to take a lifesaving vaccine,” Nolte wrote. “In a country where elections are decided on razor-thin margins, does it not benefit one side if their opponents simply drop dead?”​
How might more conservative Americans be persuaded to get vaccinated?​
One intriguing anecdote involves the football team at the University of Mississippi, which is entirely vaccinated even though the state has one of the nation’s lowest vaccination rates. Coaches there emphasized the tangible, short-term costs of getting *********, rather than the more remote chance of death: The players might have to miss a game, and the team might have to forfeit it, if they tested positive.​
A related message is duty, Timothy Carney has written in The Washington Examiner. If Carney had refused to get vaccinated, he explained, he would have risked loading more work onto his wife, his colleagues and his partner in teaching Sunday school, as well as forced his children to miss school.​
In The Atlantic, Olga Khazan has argued that fear remains the best motivator, based on her interviews with Tucker Carlson viewers who nonetheless have been vaccinated. And Daniel Darling, an evangelical author, has said that one-on-one conversations encouraging conservatives to talk with their doctors will have more success than any top-down campaign.​
Then again, Darling’s message also shows why the vaccination gap exists in the first place. After he wrote an op-ed in USA Today about his decision to get vaccinated, Darling’s employer — NRB, an association of Christian broadcasters — fired him.​
Wow, super interesting. I had no idea about the impact on red v blue America. Thanks for posting.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,135

Officials see cases tied to Pendleton Round-Up​


:p

44 cases thus far but it's only been one week since the big weekend so more can be expected to show up. The Umatilla County Health director says eventually they will "parse out what parts of Round-Up yielded which cases of the *****."

"The Walla Walla Union-Bulletin reports *********-19 is widespread in Umatilla County. Authorities say a typical day at the public health department starts with 30 cases and ends up with 70 to 80."
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,135
I feel this should be a strong message to 1. close up the cafeteria and 2. send home kids with cold-like symptoms unless they have a negative test; but I'm sure it will take the district a while to comprehend that they really need to do these two things.
Apparently, progress is being made on both fronts. Only 7 days after I posted the above so not bad.
 

Prancer

Professional Spuddler
Staff member
Messages
51,856
Winter is coming, again: What to expect from *********-19 as the season looms

Spoiler alert: Experts are divided and no one really knows. But if you've forgotten about those other respiratory viruses out there, they haven't forgotten about you.

I am really kicking myself for jumping the gun and getting a flu shot already. I usually wait until mid-October. Every time that I have had the flu, it's been in the spring after the shot started wearing off.

Some Vaccines Last a Lifetime. Here’s Why *********-19 Shots Don’t.

They don't last because of the way they are made, but mostly because the ***** mutates and thus herd immunity is unlikely.

“Vaccines are very unlikely to lead to long-lasting herd immunity for many respiratory infections,” Dr. Antia said. “The herd immunity only lasts for a modest period of time. It depends on how fast the ***** changes. It depends on how fast the immunity wanes.”

Part of the problem is that coronaviruses replicate in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts.

“We have good circulation in our lungs and body, but not on the surfaces of our nostrils,” Dr. Slifka said. “We can block severe disease because there are antibodies in the lower respiratory tract.”

But the risk of low-level infections in the upper respiratory tract can persist.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,462
This article covers pretty much everything you've ever wanted to know about who supports vaccines, who's getting them, and who blames who.

  • As the U.S. continues to grapple with the “third wave” of the *********-19 *********, the latest KFF *********-19 Vaccine Monitor finds that more than seven in ten U.S. adults (72%) now report being at least partially vaccinated, with the surge in cases, hospitalizations, and deaths due to the Delta variant being the main motivator for the recently vaccinated and other factors like full FDA approval of the Pfizer vaccine and an increase in vaccine mandates playing a more minor role. The largest increases in vaccine uptake between July and September were among Hispanic adults and those ages 18-29, and similar shares of adults now report being vaccinated across racial and ethnic groups (71% of White adults, 70% of Black adults, and 73% of Hispanic adults). Large gaps in vaccine uptake remain by partisanship, education level, age, and health insurance status...

The largest increases in self-reported *********-19 vaccination rates between July and September were among younger adults (up 11 percentage points among 18-29 year-olds) and Hispanic adults (up 12 percentage points). The largest remaining gap in vaccination rates is by partisanship, with 90% of Democrats saying they have gotten at least one dose compared to 68% of independents and 58% of Republicans. In addition, large differences in self-reported vaccination rates remain between older and younger adults, between those with and without college degrees, and between those with higher and lower incomes, while rural adults continue to lag behind those living in urban and suburban areas. Non-elderly adults without health insurance also continue to report one of the lowest *********-19 vaccination rates of any group (54%).

Similar shares of Hispanic (73%), Black (70%), and White (71%) adults now report having received at least one dose of a *********-19 vaccine, a change from earlier in the vaccination effort when Black and Hispanic adults were much less likely to report being vaccinated than White adults, and reflecting other data showing that people of color make up a disproportionate share of recent vaccinations. KFF’s analysis of state data on vaccination rates by race and ethnicity suggests that, when looking at people of all ages (including children who are not yet eligible to be vaccinated), White people continue to be vaccinated at higher rates than either Black or Hispanic people, although those gaps have narrowed over time.1
 

FiveRinger

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,394
Winter is coming, again: What to expect from *********-19 as the season looms

Spoiler alert: Experts are divided and no one really knows. But if you've forgotten about those other respiratory viruses out there, they haven't forgotten about you.

I am really kicking myself for jumping the gun and getting a flu shot already. I usually wait until mid-October. Every time that I have had the flu, it's been in the spring after the shot started wearing off.

Some Vaccines Last a Lifetime. Here’s Why *********-19 Shots Don’t.

They don't last because of the way they are made, but mostly because the ***** mutates and thus herd immunity is unlikely.

“Vaccines are very unlikely to lead to long-lasting herd immunity for many respiratory infections,” Dr. Antia said. “The herd immunity only lasts for a modest period of time. It depends on how fast the ***** changes. It depends on how fast the immunity wanes.”

Part of the problem is that coronaviruses replicate in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts.

“We have good circulation in our lungs and body, but not on the surfaces of our nostrils,” Dr. Slifka said. “We can block severe disease because there are antibodies in the lower respiratory tract.”

But the risk of low-level infections in the upper respiratory tract can persist.
Thanks for posting this. I was at CVS yesterday and thought about getting my flu shot, but decided against it until closer to Halloween. I haven't had the flu in years because I was a hospital employee and mandated to get the flu shot. I have a latex allergy and I'm always nervous about them, but I've always been assured that I'll be OK, and I have been.

I mention CVS here because that's where I got my IT vaccine, and I lost my card. To be honest, I don't remember what I did with it when I got it. But I was NOT smart. I should have taken a picture of the card and then put it in a safe place straight away. I had to drive all of the way to the other side of town to the exact CVS location where I was vaccinated to get another CDC-issued card.

I was really mad (at myself) about this. Even if you went to a chain store like I did to get the vaccine, you can't just go to any location to get a replacement if lost. According to the pharmacist, only the location you got your shot knows all of the pertinent details about the specific vaccine you got, including the lot number of the medication. When I went to the pharmacy by my house, they had record that I'd been immunized, but wouldn't give me a card, just a receipt. I have to take the actual card to report to my new job.

So, if you have your proof of IT vaccine, take a picture of it in case you lose it. It was a pain for me to get one from CVS. I don't know how hard you'll have it if you lose your card and you went to a pop-up or a drive thru location. You might need it when frequenting arenas, while traveling, or in some cases, just to see a doctor.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,463
I recommend having several backups for the card. We are keeping the actual cards with our passports, made a photocopy of them and camera shot. Our initial shots were with the public health department and I believe we would need to go to the State Public Health department to retrieve any lost info.

We have tickets for the traveling Broadway series. Tickets are electronic only and are only released a day in advance after you complete health assessment questionnaire (sort of honor.system answers so 🤷‍♀️) Masks required no matter immunization status.
 

acraven

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,360
There are many places in Europe where you need to show your card to eat inside a restaurant, go to a museum or take a train. Some countries have procedures allowing visitors to submit electronic documentation of their vaccination, etc., and receive a smart code usable for admission to local venues, but the response time can be very lengthy (weeks), and plenty of applicants end up not receiving the code at all, so they end up having to flash their CDC cards multiple times per day.
 

sk8pics

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,913
I asked my doc today if I should get a booster Moderna shot if/when they become available and he didn't even miss a beat before saying yes. He went on, "You don't want to get YNW." And commented on my previous history of blood clots.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,463
Re: the flu shot - I had mine 2 weeks ago. My pulmonologist was very clear: get it as soon as it’s available, and so I did.
I was told to get it asap, even if it needs to be repeated in February. Because of C-19, masking/social distancing/etc. last year's flu season was pretty much non existent and doctors expect a more active flu season/rsv season.
 

allezfred

Lipinski Stole My Catchphrase
Staff member
Messages
59,852
There are many places in Europe where you need to show your card to eat inside a restaurant, go to a museum or take a train. Some countries have procedures allowing visitors to submit electronic documentation of their vaccination, etc., and receive a smart code usable for admission to local venues, but the response time can be very lengthy (weeks), and plenty of applicants end up not receiving the code at all, so they end up having to flash their CDC cards multiple times per day.
We got our vaccination certificates via email automatically and could print them out or save them to our YKW tracker app.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,257
The news people always get so excited on Monday about the lower numbers - 3,681 yesterday. I said it will double tomorrow - 7,283 today (pretty close - unfortunately).

 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,135
There are now 49 cases linked to the Pendleton Roundup.

The governor is "gravely concerned." (Not so gravely concerned that she chose to require proof of vaccination for events with over a certain number of participants like California did. Honestly, it doesn't do any good to be gravely concerned now. Everyone involved--absolutely everyone--knew there would be a spike if the county held the Roundup. A whole lot of people had every opportunity to make safer decisions & they didn't).

The Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation declared a public health emergency because they had 72 cases diagnosed last week and only 47% of the reservation is vaccinated. (Once again, it's not like the tribes couldn't have pushed back on the Roundup. I don't know how involved they were this year, but generally, they are heavily involved so there is nothing surprising about the event exacerbating an outbreak on the reservation).

The health director says people went to the Roundup sick. (Of course they did. Coldlike symptoms are running through the schools like wildfire & people don't think to not attend stuff because they have a cold).


On the plus side, it rained yesterday :cheer2:. A nice solid heavy duty rain, and the night before the air wreaked of smoke. Wherever it was coming from needed the rain & so does the earth around here.

Also on the plus side, hospitalizations in Oregon are down a bit more today. Hospitals must be opening those beds to the folks with other health concerns that have been waiting, since regular & ICU beds are still 92% full. The state has reached 2,500,000 people fully vaccinated.
 

Prancer

Professional Spuddler
Staff member
Messages
51,856
My husband is just going to have to accept that one and done is not the way it is going to be:

For People Who Got The J&J Vaccine, Some Doctors Are Advising Boosters ASAP

The problem is the efficacy of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for preventing severe disease has dropped to the same level for people of all ages, according to data presented by the CDC, says Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease physician at the University of California, San Francisco.

"Unfortunately, the effectiveness of Johnson & Johnson is down to 71%, in the United States, across all age groups," she says. "And that is the data that is making a lot of [doctors] say, 'OK, let's get some recommendations from the CDC and what to do with the Johnson & Johnson booster.' And we need this to happen quickly."


Unfortunately, I don't know how all of this is supposed to work. As of now, only people who got Pfizer initially are supposed to get boosters. I don't think he can just walk into a vaccination place and get another shot of something else because they will check his records and see that he has already gotten vaccine. His doctor was supposed to research all this and get back to him, but she didn't. 🤷‍♀️
 

kwanfan1818

RIP D-10
Messages
34,270
I wonder what would happen if I did a walk-in as if I had never had any shot, said I didn't have insurance, and showed my photo ID from work instead of a drivers license. (I've moved since getting my second Moderna shot, an all of my vaccination records have my old address.) I don't know what kind of documentation is expected if you have no insurance, ie, if you need to have photo ID with DOB on it or SSN, but I thought the point was, at least in my state, to make it as easy as possible for people to get vaccinated and not to scare off the vulnerable Hispanic population, who are harassed by ICE even if they are citizens or permanent residents.

But between being able to get fake IDs and doctors willing to give shots to important patients before there was a recommendation for boosters, i suspect many people will find a way to get it, regardless of when they got their first shot and the type.
 

FiveRinger

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,394
My husband is just going to have to accept that one and done is not the way it is going to be:

For People Who Got The J&J Vaccine, Some Doctors Are Advising Boosters ASAP

The problem is the efficacy of the Johnson & Johnson vaccine for preventing severe disease has dropped to the same level for people of all ages, according to data presented by the CDC, says Monica Gandhi, an infectious disease physician at the University of California, San Francisco.

"Unfortunately, the effectiveness of Johnson & Johnson is down to 71%, in the United States, across all age groups," she says. "And that is the data that is making a lot of [doctors] say, 'OK, let's get some recommendations from the CDC and what to do with the Johnson & Johnson booster.' And we need this to happen quickly."


Unfortunately, I don't know how all of this is supposed to work. As of now, only people who got Pfizer initially are supposed to get boosters. I don't think he can just walk into a vaccination place and get another shot of something else because they will check his records and see that he has already gotten vaccine. His doctor was supposed to research all this and get back to him, but she didn't. 🤷‍♀️
I'd be interested in this, too. My father, sister, and I all did J&J. My dad is 77 years old, with no co-morbidities (other than his age) and this is all really frustrating. I have a doctors appointment tomorrow, so I will be sure to ask. But I don't think the physicians really know what to do. If you got J&J initially, do you get another or will Pfizer do? I don't want to switch unless I get the go ahead that it's safe to do so. There have been people self-attesting, and there are even places like San Francisco that are wilfully giving boosters to J&J recipients against CDC recommendations, but that's counterproductive. I don't want to get sick or have a reaction due to my own ignorance. But it's hard to be patient.
 

MacMadame

Doing all the things
Messages
43,195
I assume J&J and Moderna are studying whether or not you need boosters and info about those vaccines will come out shortly.
 

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