News & Experiences continued

anonymoose_au

Well-Known Member
Messages
202
I'm actually furious right now...

I was just scrolling through Twitter, bad idea and came across this Tweet:

https://twitter.com/Lukewearechange/status/1434521179101011968?s=19

Like...I can't even. I CANNOT even... The poster isn't the person in the video but either way imagine the jaw dropping AUDACITY and overwhelming privilege to refer to this as a Gulag.

A GULAG.

I'm actually seeing red. This is a quarantine facility called Howard Springs in the Northern Territory, Australia, it is a superior facility allowing for fresh air and space while you stay for 2 weeks in case you happen to be carrying a deadly infectious disease.

A GULAG. Really?! Imagine having seen what's happened in Afghanistan recently, imagine knowing the history of actual Gulags to say nothing of Concentration Camps and posting this BS.

And people are actually buying into this rhetoric. I left them a link to the Auschwitz Museum's Twitter, a place that was in fact a Concentration Camp. Maybe it'll give them some perspective.
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,478
A GULAG. Really?! Imagine having seen what's happened in Afghanistan recently, imagine knowing the history of actual Gulags to say nothing of Concentration Camps and posting this BS.

And people are actually buying into this rhetoric. I left them a link to the Auschwitz Museum's Twitter, a place that was in fact a Concentration Camp. Maybe it'll give them some perspective.
Auschwitz was a death camp. For some people it was (barely) survivable if they were chosen for forced labor, there or at associated camps.

However one feels about the measures used in Australia, neither the Gulag nor Nazi camps are an appropriate parallel.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,227
(I wouldn't get too excited. Sundays have always been lower. Today is a holiday. Tomorrow will probably be bad.)


 

Buzz

Socialist Canada
Messages
34,930

nylynnr

Well-Known Member
Messages
901
More ivermectin troubles:

Apologies if this has already been noted and I missed it -- after a rural Oklahoma hospital denied the claim that Ivermectin cases were causing backlogs in treatment, Rolling Stone modified this story, stating it has no independent verification.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,227
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
43,019
So could someone with knowledge of healthcare law explain the implications of both of these decisions? I think the first judge should have said what the second judge said: move your husband to a hospital where that doctor has privileges.
 

Prancer

Professional Spuddler
Staff member
Messages
51,812
So could someone with knowledge of healthcare law explain the implications of both of these decisions? I think the first judge should have said what the second judge said: move your husband to a hospital where that doctor has privileges.
the prescription of a doctor that has not seen a patient

Because there is nothing unethical about that. :shuffle:
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
43,019
the prescription of a doctor that has not seen a patient

Because there is nothing unethical about that. :shuffle:
Well, I did say he was a scam artist.

But legally, you have a judge overturning the will of a doctor. But the doctor doesn't have privileges at that hospital. So it seems complicated. Legally.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,089
Some insight into how bullies are being recruited by Republican extremists to make noise at school board meetings:

I hope these school boards are holding their meetings with a virtual option so that the parents who are actually trying to protect their children & keep the kids safe can attend and participate in the meetings. As obviously, anyone conscious of their own safety or the need not to catch the disease & spread it to their kids would be uncomfortable attending a potential superspreader meeting with a bunch of anti-mask extremists. (Nor should the school board members have to do so).

-------

On another topic, I've seen several of the same or similar posts today about how only Florida would surpass its previous death count now that vaccines have become available. I think that is a very short-sighted message to send. Spread with Delta is vastly easier than with Alpha. The U.S. has opened up a multitude of opportunities that were closed during previous surges: large events with tens of thousands of people, large/medium/small school districts, amusement parks, performance arts venues, etc. All of these without regulations on distancing. Add to this that many places did have firm restrictions in place over the 12 months before Delta, which suppressed those states' previous surges. Of course it is possible there may be new highs for deaths in many states besides Florida. Hospitalizations are passing previous hospitalization records in a high percentage of states within regions where the ***** is surging. People need to understand that reality. And also to understand that there is a vast difference between a state that has previously had explosive numbers passing its previous high for deaths and the potential for a state like Hawaii--where cases stayed comparatively low previously--passing its own previous high. Also, Florida has more people vaccinated than almost half the country, so there are plenty of states out there with poor vaccination rates & anti-safety measure leadership that could face this same awful outcome.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,414
This is a bad news/good news morning.

I'll start with the bad news. Data from Johns Hopkins indicates that daily CV cases are 4 times higher than they were a year ago on Labor Day.

Health officials noted the biggest difference between this year and last is the delta variant. They blamed the 316% increase over last year’s daily infections on the highly contagious ********* mutation as well as a large number of Americans refusing to become vaccinated against the fast-spreading disease.

According to data from Health and Human Services, hospitalization rates are also up 157% compared to Labor Day weekend 2020, leaving medical facilities packed to the brim and their staffs exhausted and overwhelmed.


Onto the good news, by way of this morning's NY Times email. It focuses on breakthrough cases. Since it's an email and not an article available via link I will cut and paste the relevant portions here.

The C.D.C. reported a terrifying fact in July: Vaccinated people with the Delta variant of the ********* ***** carried roughly the same viral load in their noses and throats as unvaccinated people.​
The news seemed to suggest that even the vaccinated were highly vulnerable to getting infected and passing the ***** to others. Sure enough, stories about vaccinated people getting ********* — so-called breakthrough infections — were all around this summer: at a party in Provincetown, Mass.; among the Chicago Cubs; on Capitol Hill. Delta seemed as if it might be changing everything.​
In recent weeks, however, more data has become available, and it suggests that the true picture is less alarming. Yes, Delta has increased the chances of getting ********* for almost everyone. But if you’re vaccinated, a ********* infection is still uncommon, and those high viral loads are not as worrisome as they initially sounded.​
How small are the chances of the average vaccinated American contracting *********? Probably about one in 5,000 per day, and even lower for people who take precautions or live in a highly vaccinated community.​
The estimates here are based on statistics from three places that have reported detailed data on ********* infections by vaccination status: Utah; Virginia; and King County, which includes Seattle, in Washington state. All three are consistent with the idea that about one in 5,000 vaccinated Americans have tested positive for ********* each day in recent weeks.​
The chances are surely higher in the places with the worst ********* outbreaks, like the Southeast. And in places with many fewer cases — like the Northeast, as well as the Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco areas — the chances are lower, probably less than 1 in 10,000. That’s what the Seattle data shows, for example. (These numbers don’t include undiagnosed cases, which are often so mild that people do not notice them and do not pass the ***** to anyone else.)​
Here’s one way to think about a one-in-10,000 daily chance: It would take more than three months for the combined risk to reach just 1 percent.​
“There’s been a lot of miscommunication about what the risks really are to vaccinated people, and how vaccinated people should be thinking about their lives,” as Dr. Ashish Jha of Brown University told my colleague Tara Parker-Pope. (I recommend Tara’s recent Q. and A. on breakthrough infections.)​
For the unvaccinated, of course, the chances of infection are far higher, as Dr. Jeffrey Duchin, the top public-health official in Seattle, has noted. Those chances have also risen much more since Delta began spreading...

Another way to understand the situation is to compare each state’s vaccination rate with its recent daily ********* infection rate. The infection rates in the least vaccinated states are about four times as high as in the most vaccinated states...
If the entire country had received shots at the same rate as the Northeast or California, the current Delta wave would be a small fraction of its current size. Delta is a problem. Vaccine hesitancy is a bigger problem.​
These numbers help show why the talking point about viral loads was problematic. It was one of those statements that managed to be both true and misleading. Even when the size of the viral loads are similar, the ***** behaves differently in the noses and throats of the vaccinated and the unvaccinated.​
In an unvaccinated person, a viral load is akin to an enemy army facing little resistance. In a vaccinated person, the human immune system launches a powerful response and tends to prevail quickly — often before the host body gets sick or infects others. That the viral loads were initially similar in size can end up being irrelevant.​
I will confess to one bit of hesitation about walking you through the data on breakthrough infections: It’s not clear how much we should be worrying about them. For the vaccinated, ********* resembles the flu and usually a mild one. Society does not ground to a halt over the flu.​
In Britain, many people have become comfortable with the current ********* risks. The vaccines make serious illness rare in adults, and the risks to young children are so low that Britain may never recommend that most receive the vaccine. Letting the ***** continue to dominate life, on the other hand, has large costs.​
“There’s a feeling that finally we can breathe; we can start trying to get back what we’ve lost,” Devi Sridhar, the head of the global public health program at the University of Edinburgh, told The Times.​
These numbers help show why the talking point about viral loads was problematic. It was one of those statements that managed to be both true and misleading. Even when the size of the viral loads are similar, the ***** behaves differently in the noses and throats of the vaccinated and the unvaccinated.
In an unvaccinated person, a viral load is akin to an enemy army facing little resistance. In a vaccinated person, the human immune system launches a powerful response and tends to prevail quickly — often before the host body gets sick or infects others. That the viral loads were initially similar in size can end up being irrelevant.
I know that many Americans feel differently. Our level of ********* anxiety is higher, especially in communities that lean to the left politically. And there is no “correct” response to *********. Different people respond to risk differently.
But at least one part of the American anxiety does seem to have become disconnected from the facts in recent weeks: the effectiveness of the vaccines. In a new ABC News/Washington Post poll, nearly half of adults judged their “risk of getting sick from the ********” as either moderate or high — even though 75 percent of adults have received at least one shot.
In reality, the risks of getting any version of the ***** remain small for the vaccinated, and the risks of getting badly sick remain minuscule.
In Seattle on an average recent day, about one out of every one million vaccinated residents have been admitted to a hospital with ********* symptoms. That risk is so close to zero that the human mind can’t easily process it. My best attempt is to say that the ********* risks for most vaccinated people are of the same order of magnitude as risks that people unthinkingly accept every day, like riding in a vehicle.
Delta really has changed the course of the *********. It is far more contagious than earlier versions of the ***** and calls for precautions that were not necessary a couple of months ago, like wearing masks in some indoor situations.
But even with Delta, the overall risks for the vaccinated remain extremely small. As Dr. Monica Gandhi, an infectious-disease specialist at the University of California, San Francisco, wrote on Friday, “The messaging over the last month in the U.S. has basically served to terrify the vaccinated and make unvaccinated eligible adults doubt the effectiveness of the vaccines.” Neither of those views is warranted.
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,719
Any British Columbians get the vaccine passport yet? I am confused. I already had Health Gatway so logging into the app, I see a QR code. Is that it? Normally, I have to get onto Gateway for a copy of my vaccine card, but I have to wait 50 minutes.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,414
An evening grab bag of articles.

Let's start with a Gallop poll on whether there should be vaccination requirements in a variety of settings. Democrats say yes, Republicans say no, and unvaccinated Independents are absolutely terrifying.

WASHINGTON, D.C. -- Majorities of Americans now favor requiring people to show proof of *********-19 vaccination to travel by airplane, stay in a hotel, attend events with large crowds, dine in a restaurant and go to their office or work site.

The most recent update of these questions is from an Aug. 16-22 survey included in Gallup's ongoing *********-19 probability-based web panel. There has been little change since April in views of vaccination requirements for airplanes and attending events. Opinions about staying in hotels and dining in restaurants have shifted. In April, majorities of Americans were opposed to vaccination requirements for hotels and dining; now, majorities are in favor.

These views are not universally held, however, reflecting divisions in public opinion on many of the issues surrounding *********. The percentages of Americans in favor of vaccination requirements range from 53% to 61% across the five situations tested, leaving a nontrivial 39% to 47% who are opposed. In short, if it came to a national referendum, these vaccination proof requirements would win -- but with significant opposition.


10 hospitals in northern Idaho will begin rationing care.

BOISE, Idaho -- Idaho public health leaders announced Tuesday that they activated “crisis standards of care” allowing health care rationing for the state's northern hospitals because there are more ******** patients than the institutions can handle.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare quietly enacted the move Monday and publicly announced it in a statement Tuesday morning — warning residents that they may not get the care they would normally expect if they need to be hospitalized.

The move came as the state's confirmed ******** cases skyrocketed in recent weeks. Idaho has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the U.S.

The state health agency cited “a severe shortage of staffing and available beds in the northern area of the state caused by a massive increase in patients with *********-19 who require hospitalization...”

The move allows hospitals to allot scarce resources like intensive care unit rooms to patients most likely to survive.

Other patients will still receive care, but they may be placed in hospital classrooms or conference rooms rather than traditional hospital rooms or go without some life-saving medical equipment.


(Personally, if a family member were being thrust into second rate care because some unvaccinated CV patient was taking up an ICU bed, I'd be close to homicidal.)

Finally, onto football. Since the NFL season is about to begin, a story about the Denver Bronco quarterbacks behavior last year seems appropriate.

Every Broncos QB on the active roster at the time last November — Drew Lock, Brett Rypien, Blake Bortles and Jeff Driskel — was ruled ineligible for the Saints game. It was reported at the time that those quarterbacks were not forthcoming during contact-tracing investigations, were in close contact with each other without wearing masks and didn’t carry their tracking devices as they were instructed...

John Elway, Denver’s president of football operations, made several frustrated pleas to Goodell to postpone the Sunday game until Tuesday, when the quarterbacks would be available. The league denied those requests because surveillance video from Denver’s facility showed the quarterbacks had tried to fool the system. They had removed their contact-tracing devices and put them in the four corners of the meeting room, then they sat together to watch film. That close contact automatically made them ineligible to play.

The darned eye in the sky strikes again. That the quarterbacks didn't think or know that there might be surveillance at the UCHealth Training Center is a bad enough look. Apparently lying about their actions afterward also didn't work to their benefit, but it put the team in an awkward spot.





 
Messages
8,605
Any British Columbians get the vaccine passport yet? I am confused. I already had Health Gatway so logging into the app, I see a QR code. Is that it? Normally, I have to get onto Gateway for a copy of my vaccine card, but I have to wait 50 minutes.
I was able to get mine. I’m a little confused because when I saved it to my phone it’s a printable PDF, not like a digital thing but it has a QR code so I’m sure it’ll work 🤷‍♀️ I might see if I did something wrong in a few days when there’s less demand. I had to refresh the page a couple of times.
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,719
My QR code is just a code, the news indicate that there will be coloured frame (green for fully vaccinated, blue for partial). But I have no coloured frame, no name either. I did not save it as a PDF, I just screenshot it. No idea if that works or not.

ETA: never mind, even with my health services app already downloaded, you still have to get the QR code through the website (it just bypasses having to include information like health number and date of birth). I got the code, yeah, you can’t yet save it as a PDF. I have never had a barcode scanner via a simple screenshot called let’s see if it will work. Nothing particularly fancy like in Quebec. Won’t we have the same problems that Netherlands had?
 
Last edited:

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
11,089
I don't have time to read this tonight but I'm posting it here so I don't forget & also because the topic rang familiar with a conversation I had recently:

A friend was worry warting that she may get moved from her position at work to fill in for a teacher that hasn't confirmed he/she is getting vaccinated. (Apparently there was also a meeting among staff who are planning to get religious exemptions. We were laughing a bit over all the people who have suddenly "found Jesus." Not that either of us can figure out why these people think Jesus wouldn't be all for protecting the lives of kids). Anyway, these people are going to have to make up their minds here and/or get their proof for an exemption mighty soon.

It just kind of surprises me that these adults are so unprepared. Goodness knows, I do understand how difficult it can be making life decisions during this *********. But FDA approval has been coming down the pipeline for a year. For some people, it may or may not impact their employment; but if you're working any job that serves the public, I think it would be wise to decide in advance what you're going to do about it. Because I can totally fathom one or some of these teachers a. realizing that no, they are not actually going to get a religious exemption and b. they need to keep their job, but c. oh yeah, they really needed to get their first shot by the start of September.
 

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,478
Well, well, well. Look at this nice proof that the Australian government was offered Pfizer doses by the millions back at the end of June 2020 and did stuff-all about taking up the offer until it was too late and they could only get a fraction of the original offer.
Nobody knew for sure back then who will be able to develop a more successful vaccine and what the time frame would end up being. The smart thing would have been to have options with multiple promising companies who were using different technologies, but this was certainly not feasible for everyone.

FWIW, Israel didn't have an agreement in place with Pfizer until after they published the results from the clinical trial (there was a deal with Moderna). But we were able to get vaccines quickly by offering something that was irresistible to Pfizer: data.
 

Lemonade20

If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.
Messages
1,765
Any British Columbians get the vaccine passport yet? I am confused. I already had Health Gatway so logging into the app, I see a QR code. Is that it? Normally, I have to get onto Gateway for a copy of my vaccine card, but I have to wait 50 minutes.
Yes, the initial wait was for your QR code to load. It's now above where you have the vaccinations. People were rushing to download which is why the wait, but since you did it already, it was just "waiting in line" till you get in and it loads up. It's to make it easier for checking at events, etc.
 

once_upon

Vaccinated
Messages
19,325
I'm so pissed at the anti vax people, the no mask people, the C-19 deniers, the "my freedom" idiots holding us hostage. I dont want them to get any medical care at all.

Now if there is a legitimate MEDICAL reason, that's entirely different. If vaccines aren't available in their country, that's different..

But the fake religious crap, no or the "my freedom" screamers no. I'm tired of their crap.

Save the ICU beds for those who actually are trying to prevent the spread. The rest of them...
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,227
Every time they have an anti-whatever person on t.v. - I say just wear a mask, get the vaccination, and shut up. If as many people get sick and die, then you can say I told you so.
 
Messages
8,605
C*vid is ripping through the unvaccinated people in the church circles that my brother and dad are involved with. Not a single person fully vaccinated has had symptoms so far. Unfortunately, one of those people is the sister of a friend, who has multiple disabilities and is very medically complex. She’s somewhat okay for now, but she’s very high risk to have a tough time with it.
 

Lemonade20

If I agreed with you, we’d both be wrong.
Messages
1,765
C*vid is ripping through the unvaccinated people in the church circles that my brother and dad are involved with. Not a single person fully vaccinated has had symptoms so far. Unfortunately, one of those people is the sister of a friend, who has multiple disabilities and is very medically complex. She’s somewhat okay for now, but she’s very high risk to have a tough time with it.
So sorry to hear that! That makes me so angry that the "freedumb" people don't care what happens to our more vulnerable population. Stay safe out there
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
43,019
I actually saw an ad for Moderna on my phone the other day. That surprised me. (I have seen plenty of PSA's from public health people to just get vaccinated already but nothing from the maker for a particular vaccination.)
 

Users who are viewing this thread

Top
Do Not Sell My Personal Information