News & Experiences continued

ballettmaus

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16,786
It was detected in Houston and it has appeared in about 30 other countries. One report from Chilean researchers suggests that it more contagious than Delta and may be resistant to the current vaccines.
That's why I wish they'd wait with a booster or included Lambda right away.

Wasn't YKW supposed to mutate into a cold, not a superv*rus? And wasn't it supposed to mutate slowly?
 

Louis

Private citizen
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16,039
How did it make its way to the US? People were sick in Peru and then just somehow boarded a plane to the US and it started spreading from there? Same with the Delta variant. (I'm genuinely curious and there seem to be a lot of experts on this board.) Really wish we'd stop allowing the international travel for awhile.

Australia has basically done this, and is nevertheless dealing with C19 and lockdowns at the moment - though the number of cases is something most countries would dream of.

The travel restrictions to the US are still quite extreme, by global comparison -- e.g., no Europeans can enter the U.S. right now for tourism purposes, despite US citizens being welcome in Europe.

Even "shutting down" international travel is never going to be 100%. Citizens can return home. Essential personnel is needed to operate flights, trucks / lorries, and ships - including cargo and essential supply chains. There are compassionate exceptions for funerals, etc.

Plus, we have to give people some benefits / hope / freedom in exchange for vaccination. I think we've seen in the UK that the possibility for international travel caused many fence-sitters to run to get vaccinated as fast as they can. People are sick of sticks and need some carrots.
 

ballettmaus

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16,786
This does not sound as scary. https://tinyurl.com/psu5urkm

Mutations occurring there and in other parts of lambda are similar to those in variants of concern, like alpha and gamma, Long said. But even gamma, which never took hold in the U.S. to the same level as alpha or delta, has more concerning mutations than lambda, Long said.

...

However, the variant hasn't spread nearly to the same level on a global scale as the delta variant. Lambda may have become so widespread in parts of South America largely because of a "founder effect," Long said, wherein a few cases of the variant first took hold in a densely populated and geographically restricted area and slowly became the primary driver for the spread locally over time.
 

Dobre

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10,999
Oregon had over 1,000 new cases again today. Over 100 for both Jackson and Umatilla County again, this time not reflecting weekend numbers. Sherman County, which is super rural, has probably the most cases I've seen for them in a week. With Sherman, case numbers typically trickle in & the county could turn red based on one family; but this is more than one family so potentially an actual outbreak. Union has 21 cases, which is high for them and on the heels of another high number not long ago. 6 deaths in the state today. 4,600+ vaccinations. 285 hospitalizations. (Le sigh. We're headed back over 300. Countdown to the serious conversations about what to do about this in four, three, two . . .)

Oh, the mask mandate is back for K-12 schools in Oregon:).

Per the article I linked yesterday, hospitals on the east side of the state are filling up. It said only 13 out of 79 ICU beds east of the Cascade Mountains were available and that doctors in Pendleton had to call 15 hospitals to try to find an open spot for a patient transfer this week.

Oregon hospitals brace for new surge in *********-19 patients; some delay surgeries​


"St. Charles Health System, in Bend, has moved to an 'emergency-only' status indefinitely. It has informed patients it is delaying all elective surgeries that require an overnight stay until Aug. 4 at the earliest.

'We are experiencing severe capacity constraints,' said Dr. Jeff Absalon, executive vice president at St. Charles. 'Our hospitals are essentially overwhelmed with sick patients, with ********* and other illnesses. They’re sicker and they’re staying longer.'"

"Most of the major hospitals and health systems in the state have hundreds of vacancies they’re trying to fill. St. Charles alone is trying to fill 600 openings, about half of them nurses.

That’s in part because after nearly 18 months of *********, nurses, certified nursing assistants and other front-line caregivers have had enough. Morale is low in some locations and attrition is high."
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,999
People are sick of people getting sick. Unfortunately, it's not the same people who are refusing to get vaccinated.
 

Catherine M

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13,069
Things are really, really bad here in Louisiana and sadly we have a lot of very sick kids at the hospital where I work. The myth that C-19 doesn't affect kids is no more and that is really sad as the kids under 12 are so vulnerable.

I'm really proud of our staff, trying to keep up and working hard because in a cruel twist of fate, as RSV is out of control this summer too. If y'all could spare a moment to send positive thoughts/vibes our way, it would be greatly appreciated.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
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10,999
If y'all could spare a moment to send positive thoughts/vibes our way, it would be greatly appreciated.
🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈

CDC mask decision followed stunning findings from Cape Cod beach outbreak​

A group of vaccinated beachgoers changed our knowledge of the delta variant.

"As of Thursday, 882 people were tied to the Provincetown outbreak. Among those living in Massachusetts, 74% of them were fully immunized, yet officials said the vast majority were also reporting symptoms. Seven people were reported hospitalized.

The initial findings of the investigation led by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, seemed to have huge implications.

Before Provincetown, health officials had been operating under the assumption that it was extraordinarily rare for a vaccinated person to become infected with the *****."

But that assumption had been based on studies of earlier versions of the *****. Delta was known for its 'hyper-transmissibility,' or as one former White House adviser put it "********* on steroids."

"What has changed is the *****," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert and Biden's chief medical adviser.

When a vaccinated person gets infected with delta -- called a 'breakthrough infection' -- 'the level of ***** in their nasopharynx is about 1,000 times higher than with the alpha variant,' Fauci said in an interview Wednesday with MSNBC.

All indications now are that the Provincetown outbreak investigation is among the pieces of new evidence behind the CDC's decision to ask Americans to once again put on their masks indoors, even if they are vaccinated."
 

FGRSK8

Toad whisperer.....
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20,037
🌈🌈🌈🌈🌈

CDC mask decision followed stunning findings from Cape Cod beach outbreak​

A group of vaccinated beachgoers changed our knowledge of the delta variant.

"As of Thursday, 882 people were tied to the Provincetown outbreak. Among those living in Massachusetts, 74% of them were fully immunized, yet officials said the vast majority were also reporting symptoms. Seven people were reported hospitalized.

The initial findings of the investigation led by the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, in conjunction with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, seemed to have huge implications.

Before Provincetown, health officials had been operating under the assumption that it was extraordinarily rare for a vaccinated person to become infected with the *****."

But that assumption had been based on studies of earlier versions of the *****. Delta was known for its 'hyper-transmissibility,' or as one former White House adviser put it "********* on steroids."

"What has changed is the *****," said Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation's top infectious disease expert and Biden's chief medical adviser.

When a vaccinated person gets infected with delta -- called a 'breakthrough infection' -- 'the level of ***** in their nasopharynx is about 1,000 times higher than with the alpha variant,' Fauci said in an interview Wednesday with MSNBC.

All indications now are that the Provincetown outbreak investigation is among the pieces of new evidence behind the CDC's decision to ask Americans to once again put on their masks indoors, even if they are vaccinated."
Living in eastern MA, I have been following this.

I am beginning to think we may have witnessed the birth of a new variant….Delta P-town.
 
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SkateSand

Cat Servant
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1,278
Well, I got my answer on Cabo (from the ever helpful Trip Advisor Travel Forums). Turns out there are still 30% capacity hotel restrictions (and hours allowed to be open - all restaurants and bars and some other businesses have to close by 10:00 p.m.). If you've ever been to Cabo, that 10:00 p.m. closing at the Marina must be hurting them big time. Employers can't hire back or employ full staff with the 30% capacity restrictions and the reduced hours.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,999
Russia had another new high for deaths.

Florida reported 17,500 plus cases today. So, nope, not doing once a week, though goodness knows what the system is.

Hospitalizations are surging in Mississippi, and hospitals are starting to limit elective procedures.

Per the NY Times, Louisiana is up to 77 new cases per 100K, Florida is at 63, Arkansas at 53.

Infant among children battling ********* in Alabama hospitals: ‘I’m scared now,’ UAB pediatrician says​


Lots of personal articles now about people in the hospital who regret not getting vaccinated. And/or about family members who lost loved ones & are urging people to get vaccinated.
 

Miezekatze

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16,006
Australia has basically done this, and is nevertheless dealing with C19 and lockdowns at the moment - though the number of cases is something most countries would dream of.
IMO the situation in Australia is worse now than everywhere else?

People sitting around in full lockdown, low vaccination rate and nobody with any naturally obtained immunity, while having case numbers where here in Germany and Switzerland we currently allow nightclubs to open up and 25.000 people into soccer stadiums, because numbers are so low.

That sort of results in a "deadlock" of having to isolate the country for another 1 to 2 years, while the ***** is already becoming endemic in other parts of the world.
 

Louis

Private citizen
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16,039
Adding to @Miezekatze: Sweden isn't in the news too much these days :shuffle:. That's because rolling average of deaths in Sweden are down to zero, despite never succumbing to the draconian restrictions implemented almost everywhere else. As we see more and more breakthrough infections, and as vaccinations look less likely to truly "end" this thing, the Swedish strategy of treating C19 as a marathon looks smarter and smarter. Yes, there were some tragic mistakes, but I don't know any country that didn't make tragic mistakes during this p*ndemic. As an overall strategy, I continue to believe the Swedish model will have the greatest long-term success. The economy is already larger than pre-p*ndemic, and the country does not have the same educational crisis, medical backlog crisis, and mental health crisis that will continue to cost other countries lives and money for years to come.

The countries that have depended on lockdowns and heavy-handed restrictions have no exit.
 

Miezekatze

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16,006
At least Sweden is doing pretty well this year. My cousins were just vacationing there, visiting my cousin who lives there.

Personally I also find that Switzerland seems to have found a good measure between restrictions and freedom, even though Germany did well too, we never overloaded our hospitals (and every wave was less bad than feared beforehand) and I'm confident we'll continue to manage that, but Switzerland managed to have their schools open all the time AND not overload their health system and IMO that's even better.

Now our most pessimistic health expert says that probably every unvaccinated person will get infected in the next 6 months, so this basically means we'll end up with about the same result as the UK anyway, just trying to space it out a bit more reasonably than UK, but generally with no European country having contained the *****, we're now all going to end up getting infected anyway, also many of the vaccinated people, just hopefully only with symptoms like you had.

I feel a lot safer vaccinated now though, since the protection from severe disease should be good. I hope we can motivate more Germans to get vaccinated before the Delta wave hits, now our numbers are still relatively low and nobody bothers to get the vaccine :rolleyes: I hope some Macron-esque methods can improve that.
 

MsZem

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16,326
IMO the situation in Australia is worse now than everywhere else?

People sitting around in full lockdown, low vaccination rate and nobody with any naturally obtained immunity, while having case numbers where here in Germany and Switzerland we currently allow nightclubs to open up and 25.000 people into soccer stadiums, because numbers are so low.
Yes. I know our Australian friends here disagree, but I don't see how that's a sustainable strategy. I realize that cases there are lower than elsewhere and that allows for normal life. But that's at a cost of putting millions of people into months of lockdown at a time, and it's certainly not normal life then, or for the Australians who want to come home and can't.

Israel is starting third doses for people over the age of 60. The thinking is that their immune systems aren't as strong so a booster may help. We'll see if that works.
I wish they'd figure out a way to increase vaccination rates among teenagers. That might be helpful in curbing cases.
 

ballettmaus

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16,786
Israel is starting third doses for people over the age of 60. The thinking is that their immune systems aren't as strong so a booster may help. We'll see if that works.
Since they're developing a booster meant to target Delta, I'm not sure about that. I get their reasoning but how many vaccines do they want to put into people within a year and at what point will it be too much?
 

Miezekatze

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16,006
I've already informed my parents that they might have to get a 3rd shot in November/December, that's when vaccine efficency might wane for them after 6 months.

I'm not too worried about many shots for older people. After all they never build up all that much antibodies, so I don't really think there's as much risk of "too much reaction" as with younger people.

Quite frankly if my life span was over 70 and this ***** was a risk, I'd rather take too many shots then not being protected or being isolated (that said, I understand if people with strong vaccination reactions might think otherwise, but my parents and all 60+ people I know had basically no side effects at all).
 

Miezekatze

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I read a report about Denmark this morning. They seem to be doing well with a high vaccination rate and gradual lifting of restrictions, most of which are already gone at the moment (except for examples nightclubs not opening yet).

They're 7-days incidence has been fluctuating around 100 for most of summer (currently 97), which did not lead to problems in hospitalizations or deaths (so their numbers are on paper for example much worse than in Sweden or Germany right now, but it's not making problems, which I think will be the key to managing Delta).
 

Bunny Hop

Queen of the Workaround
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6,883
Yes. I know our Australian friends here disagree, but I don't see how that's a sustainable strategy. I realize that cases there are lower than elsewhere and that allows for normal life. But that's at a cost of putting millions of people into months of lockdown at a time, and it's certainly not normal life then, or for the Australians who want to come home and can't.
I actually agree that it's not sustainable. It would have worked if our Government had made deals for a wider range and earlier supply of vaccines but they didn't, and hence we're now stuck in lockdown at a time when we could have been cautiously starting to open up again.

Our number of cases may look low, but we also have a significantly smaller population, so letting the v*r*s run through the community could also potentially be very damaging.

As of today we're aiming for 70% of the population fully vaccinated before easing restrictions, but we're nowhere near that (18% fully vaccinated) and don't expect to have enough supply of Pfizer until the end of the year. The Government wants the vaccination rate to be 80% before starting to open up borders.
 
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MsZem

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16,326
Our number of cases may look low, but we also have a significantly smaller population, so letting the v*r*s run through the community could also potentially be very damaging.
Israel has a smaller population concentrated in a much smaller area. Likewise Switzerland, which Miezekatze mentioned. Trust me, your case numbers are low.

Working in our favor, even before vaccinations began: a good health system and a young population. Working against us, then and now: Israelis being Israelis.
 

Orm Irian

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IMO the situation in Australia is worse now than everywhere else?
The situation in Sydney is worse than many places right now. The rest of the country is either completely open or in the process of opening up after very short sharp lockdowns that have eradicated Delta variant outbreaks in the community.

Please don't make the same mistake that Sydneysiders make and assume that one city equals the whole of a very large country! :lol:
 

MsZem

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16,326
The situation in Sydney is worse than many places right now.
And it's much, much better compared to many other places.

The rest of the country is either completely open or in the process of opening up after very short sharp lockdowns that have eradicated Delta variant outbreaks in the community.

Please don't make the same mistake that Sydneysiders make and assume that one city equals the whole of a very large country! :lol:
I don't think people in Melbourne had it much better when they went through that super-long lockdown.

How many people is it acceptable to keep locked down for months?
 

Miezekatze

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Israel has a smaller population concentrated in a much smaller area. Likewise Switzerland, which Miezekatze mentioned. Trust me, your case numbers are low.

Working in our favor, even before vaccinations began: a good health system and a young population. Working against us, then and now: Israelis being Israelis.
I was looking at this concert from Northern Germany and I think young Germans are really not that bad at "partying" with discipline, considering how hard it is to control something like that. :lol:


Indoor masking discipline is also really not bad here.

I was at a very crowded main station last Sunday accompanying a friend to her train and everybody wore their masks correctly.

Also only medical masks are allowed here and in Austria, no cloth masks.

That won't avoid another delta wave, but I hope we can at least keep it under similar control as Denmark for example.
 

MsZem

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16,326
Indoor masking discipline is also really not bad here.

I was at a very crowded main station last Sunday accompanying a friend to her train and everybody wore their masks correctly.
So jealous. Many Israelis seem to believe that if you need to talk on the phone while in a public space, it's perfectly acceptable to take off your mask so that your conversation partner can hear you better.

I don't think inane phone calls should be acceptable in public spaces even without the possibility of getting CV!
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
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67,867
Things are really, really bad here in Louisiana and sadly we have a lot of very sick kids at the hospital where I work. The myth that C-19 doesn't affect kids is no more and that is really sad as the kids under 12 are so vulnerable.

I'm really proud of our staff, trying to keep up and working hard because in a cruel twist of fate, as RSV is out of control this summer too. If y'all could spare a moment to send positive thoughts/vibes our way, it would be greatly appreciated.
Arkansas Children's Hospital is experiencing the same. A friend who is an orthopedic surgeon in Little Rock said the situation is very bad. He's wearing a mask everywhere again.
 

Miezekatze

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16,006
Switzerland and Germany are also seeing RSV waves (and New Zealand, I read about that a few weeks ago). It's cause children had little exposure to viruses during fall/winter with more restrictions and now there's a rebound effect in summer.
 

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