News & Experiences continued

MsZem

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,860
I'm not sure that would work either. There probably is a number of people who'd claim those are made-up stories and people get paid to pay them :(
There isn't one intervention that's going to work for everyone, short of legally mandating certain behaviors (and even then not everyone will comply). But there is research on the effectiveness of storytelling and the use of personal stories in the context of health messaging, as well as anecdotal examples. So while this is not my area of expertise, I feel pretty confident in saying that relatable personal stories can have an effect here.
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
15,844
This could be a "famous last words" type of thing, but I'm not convinced the current bad state in England will get that much worse. Not much is changing.

- I am not aware of a single place where I had to wear a mask yesterday where I don't need to wear a mask today. We've gone from "legal requirement" to "guidance," but nothing has changed practically

- No one was distancing anyway, and things had become quite crowded - in fact, chaotic and worse than usual due to the freaking football

- Mask usage was already getting very iffy. I could count on half of the people on any tube or train not to have a mask on. Masks were never required outdoors.

The only real difference is nightclubs can open, but to be honest, other places were already getting as crowded as nightclubs.

We've been ripping off the band-aid slowly, and I think the increasingly lax enforcement of the rules has already shown up in the numbers.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,829
I'm also not sure what exactly what happened in the Netherlands should tell anyone.

The Netherlands imposed restrictions again, because they are not willing to risk very high infection numbers. Which is understandable because in the Netherlands only 43% of the population is fully vaccinated. The infection numbers in the Netherlands are still a bit lower than in the UK, despite them having a lower number of once or fully vaccinated people.

But everything is still open, except for night life and big festivals.

So the main difference is probably that young people will not get to party for another year (or they will by flying to other countries) and concerts and big events will have to get paid public aids, while not being able to make money normally.

I'd say the generation 40+ will be fine with that, cause they can do most in things in a fashin that is fine with them, while ignoring rules whenever they want (at least that's what they are doing here in Germany)

Young people will be extremely frustrated for another year and have a shitty school year while not being able to do the things young people normally do normally.

All generations will be annoyed by travel rules, but in middle Europe you can can easier travel anyway.

I think in countries like Germany it will get complicated in September/October, because then definitely everybody who will have wanted a vaccine will be fully vaccinated, so on the one hand there will be the loudest call to lift restrictions for the vaccinated, but of course that's when the regular fall *********-19 wave will start.
So we'll be at the same point of the vaccination campaign in Germany as the UK is now, just when the typical fall wave starts and everybody in politics agrees that then restrictions will have to be kept at an absolute minimum for vaccinated adults, which will certainly be complicated.
I expect we'll keep masks indoors for everybody (compliance is so so here, indoor it tends to be ok-ish) and businesses will require people to be vaccinated, tested or infected, but the government will make it unattractive to get tested, which will either result in unvaccinated people changing their mind or them only meeting people privately at home and avoiding public leisure life (both would probably help a bit with infection numbers, because when unvaccinated people only meet at home, they tend to always meet the same people I guess and not mingle so much with the public in settings that tend to be "party-ish").

So I tend to think fall/winter will go ok here, but it certainly won't be "easy" either, with all the vaccinated people expecting freedom and the unvaccinated people being pissed about not getting the same rights (there also were protests in France and Cyprus and Greece against "Green Pass" ideas, in Cyprus those turned violent yesterday) and young people being frustrated with the lack of normal school/studying and normal activities.

And as in the UK the German vaccination authority has not recommended vaccinating 12-18 year olds generally.
 
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once_upon

Well-Known Member
Messages
18,821
Our property manager has tested positive for C-19. We had a large farewell party for him on Tuesday (he's moving for family reasons). He started feeling feverish on Thursday evening.

I guess we will be getting a test tomorrow or Tuesday
My test came back negative. I thought it would be a minuscule chance, since I saw him on Tuesday, for a brief time, in a large we'll ventilated room. His symptoms started on Thursday evening.

But you all talking about thinking it was allergies, I decided to get tested. Even though I've had the allergy symptoms since June.
 

Stefanie

Well-Known Member
Messages
2,757
They work, but it's not 100% effective - so it makes sense to require testing to be on the safe side.
True, but I also was thinking about the flu shot (yes, I know the flu and YKW aren't the same)...I get the flu shot every year and my employer (or an airline, border control, etc.) doesn't ask for me to get tested for flu AFTER the fact to make sure I don't have it (or am asymptomatic). Probably a moot point since they are two different illnesses and I'm not sure if you can be asymptomatic for the flu even if you've had the shot) but it just had me thinking. And the flu shot has been around for decades.
 
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missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,149
This morning's NY Times CV19 email dealt with people who'd been resistant to getting vaccinated and have since done so. Their reasons seemed to be: seeing other people got vaccinated without problems, being told by people they love or respect to get vaccinated or realizing that some things are just easier if you're vaccinated.

All of which is fine and I hope everyone comes to their senses. But in addition, the Times had a Kaiser Family Foundation percentage list of who has been vaccinated, and it answered a couple of questions (like the female/male ratio) that I'd been wondering about.

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once_upon

Well-Known Member
Messages
18,821
True, but I also was thinking about the flu shot (yes, I know the flu and YKW aren't the same)...I get the flu shot every year and my employer (or an airline, border control, etc.) doesn't ask for me to get tested for flu AFTER the fact to make sure I don't have it (or am asymptomatic). Probably a moot point since they are two different illnesses and I'm not sure if you can be asymptomatic for the flu even if you've had the shot) but it just had me thinking. And the flu shot has been around for decades.
The year I had influenza B, I had the flu immunizations. They did do a screening to determine if it was the flu or another respiratory thing like RSV. I believe flu vaccines have efficacy rates of between 10 - 50% depending on the year.

People do get titers done after immunizations. I have a friend who never developed antibodies after receiving the chicken pox immunizations. Everytime she is exposed (working in pediatrics, that is at least once a year..thanks anti vaxxers) she needs titers done. I think they tried giving her repeat series without success.

I dont know if they still do Measles titers on pregnant women as part of the initial blood work draws. But 30-40 years ago that was standard.

I think C-19 is mutating rapidly and we may not know coverage, it is reasonable for testing to be done for some things like travel, especially in enclosed prolonged vacations like cruises (water or land). I'm not as certain about sports, although how rapidly it spread in one team bubble at the NCAA baseball championship tournament I lean towards testing for athletes.
 

canbelto

Well-Known Member
Messages
6,308
This morning's NY Times CV19 email dealt with people who'd been resistant to getting vaccinated and have since done so. Their reasons seemed to be: seeing other people got vaccinated without problems, being told by people they love or respect to get vaccinated or realizing that some things are just easier if you're vaccinated.

All of which is fine and I hope everyone comes to their senses. But in addition, the Times had a Kaiser Family Foundation percentage list of who has been vaccinated, and it answered a couple of questions (like the female/male ratio) that I'd been wondering about.

TTw5rEAcI8mHJ6tuPATVFvmtPkLCVM2B9pkR2QplQbpea85mNZF7x5Q_nhcooOHJO4Tj5QMW2UxO-0Kkx_M3lp0vvEpTl2HBS-pg_AlSJ0xQJyatsA_7MacAsEy-e7uXxO9qvuYR5CYiPTeM8kpARomUvy2Eu94Iup_BnL76nMEv2yxdOA=s0-d-e1-ft

That "Republicans" at 52% really sticks out. It's a lower vaccination rate than Blacks and No College Degree, two of the groups experts had been the most worried about being vaccine hesitant.
 

skatfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
5,611
True, but I also was thinking about the flu shot (yes, I know the flu and YKW aren't the same)...I get the flu shot every year and my employer (or an airline, border control, etc.) doesn't ask for me to get tested for flu AFTER the fact to make sure I don't have it (or am asymptomatic). Probably a moot point since they are two different illnesses and I'm not sure if you can be asymptomatic for the flu even if you've had the shot) but it just had me thinking. And the flu shot has been around for decades.
It’s not the flu. That is why.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
4,149
62% of vaccinated Americans say they want a booster shot.

More than 6 in 10 vaccinated Americans now say they would get an additional *********-19 booster shot if it were available to them, according to a new Yahoo News/YouGov poll.

The survey of 1,715 U.S. adults, which was conducted from July 13 to 15, found that a full 62 percent of those who’ve been vaccinated would receive another jab if possible, while just 18 percent would decline. Another 20 percent are not sure...

That eagerness likely reflects growing concerns about Delta. Awareness of the variant has become almost universal, with 85 percent of Americans now saying they have heard of it (up from 73 percent four weeks ago) and 57 percent saying they are “very” or “somewhat” worried about it (up from 49 percent). Tellingly, more Americans now say they are worried about Delta (again, 57 percent) than about the ******** generally (50 percent).

But those worries are not distributed equally across the U.S. population. In fact, vaccinated Americans (the ones who have the least to fear from Delta) are far more worried about the variant than unvaccinated Americans (the ones who have the most cause for concern).

While 85 percent of vaccinated Americans say Delta poses a "serious risk" to either "all Americans" (32 percent) or "unvaccinated Americans" (53 percent), for instance, only half of unvaccinated Americans (50 percent) say the same, with just 17 percent specifying that it's the unvaccinated who are at risk. Another 30 percent of the unvaccinated, meanwhile, say Delta "doesn’t pose a serious risk to any Americans.”

Paradoxically, then, a full 77 percent of vaccinated Americans are worried about the spread of Delta — yet just 51 percent of unvaccinated Americans share their concern. Likewise, a mere 18 percent of unvaccinated Americans say they plan to protect themselves from Delta and other variants by getting vaccinated in the future — less than a third of the share of vaccinated Americans who say they want an additional layer of protection from a yet-to-be-approved booster shot.

 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,531
If a booster becomes available, I'll certainly take it. From everything I've read, I'm hoping that a booster may also mean long gaps before other boosters, kind of like with Hepatitis A&B (the one I got is also a 3-shot vaccine; first shot, second shot after 4 weeks, third after 6 months and then it's good for 10 years).
I guess that'll depend largely on the variants but if the vaccines already work against Delta, here's to hoping that a booster would also work well against new variants.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
41,791
I dont know if they still do Measles titers on pregnant women as part of the initial blood work draws. But 30-40 years ago that was standard.
22 years ago too. :D

Sounds like Fox news is worried about something all of a sudden?
Fox & Friends is their answer to The View and other shows like that. It's commentary, not news. So it's whatever they and their guests feel like talking about and what opinions they have. To know what "Fox News" as a corporate identity thinks, their nightly news programs are a better bet.
 

Orm Irian

Well-Known Member
Messages
1,175
NSW is still having about a quarter of each day's cases active in the community while infectious, Victoria has extended its lockdown by another seven days to try and get ahead of the chains of transmission and here in South Australia we will be in a seven-day lockdown from 6pm today due to a new outbreak of community transmission (only five cases so far, but there will be more).

Thanks, #ScottyDoesNothing.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,427
Hospitals are filling up in surging communities in all the states with 25 or more cases per 100K.

Jacksonville, Florida
(This hospital broke its January record for its highest number of patients today. They had over a 40% increase of patients, from 86 to 123 in one day).
Cases are doubling in Florida each week.

Hospitalizations in Southwest Missouri also passed their winter peak.

*********-19 hospitalizations surge in Louisiana as delta variant preys on the unvaccinated​

"On Saturday night, Louisiana's biggest hospital, Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center in Baton Rouge, admitted its largest batch of patients since cases last peaked in January, said Dr. Catherine O'Neal, the hospital's chief medical officer."

Michigan has now given enough doses to cover 50% of its total population.

NPR updated their actual map today:
Red: Missouri, Arkansas, Louisiana, Florida
Orange: Alaska, Wyoming, Nevada, Utah, Arizona, Oklahoma, Texas, Kansas, Mississippi, Alabama


(I'm afraid the common-cold Delta symptoms may be the reason that tests are down in the U.S., despite the fact that cases, hospitalizations, and deaths are all up).
_____

Oregon has 777 new cases over the the past 3 days. I think more than 200 more than were reported last Monday. 2000+ vaccinations, 148 hospitalizations, 9 deaths reported.
 

FGRSK8

Toad whisperer.....
Messages
19,883
That "Republicans" at 52% really sticks out. It's a lower vaccination rate than Blacks and No College Degree, two of the groups experts had been the most worried about being vaccine hesitant.
Well, they are going to get vaccinated if they like it or not if they catch the variant…..
 

Bunny Hop

Queen of the Workaround
Messages
6,729
A far-right British commentator boasted about breaking quarantine rules, and Australia deported her

:HA!: Serves her right.
Indeed. Although why she was given a visa to get into the country in the first place when there are still 34,000 Australians who want to come home and can't, remains a question. Apparently she was granted it at the request of the state due to the "economic benefit" of her appearing on reality TV show. We've already got plenty of our own Z-list celebrities, why do we need to import them?
NSW is still having about a quarter of each day's cases active in the community while infectious,
Let's put it this way, I think my chances of actually using my tickets to see 'Hamilton' in September are close to zero.
 

marbri

Hey, Kool-Aid!
Messages
13,694
The negative testing requirement for fully vaccinated Americans sucks, IMO. Either vaccines work or they don't.
Be thankful they are still requiring negative tests even if they are fully vaccinated.
We are one of the most vaccinated countries in the world, we didn't test fully vaccinated people coming into the country.
We are now firmly in our fourth wave, all vaccinated people, all spreading it throughout the country.
As of July 26th all fully vaccinated travellers will now need a negative PCR test within 72 hours of arrival.
That is what Canada requires and I think we should have been doing that as well.

From a scientific point of view I think it will be interesting to watch what happens here in the coming weeks as 90% of 16 + (78% of total population) have all been vaccinated with Pfizer, Moderna, AZ or Janssen. As of yesterday the majority of those testing positive got Janssen. Janssen was given to 18-49 year olds so not a vulnerable group and no serious cases so far. The next few weeks should tell us more.
eta.. For information I will add these are mostly Delta cases.
 
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Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,829
Janssen never had good efficency for avoiding symptomatic infections even without variants in the mix, so I don't think that would be surprising.

It shouldn't really be a problem though, if it keeps avoiding severe cases.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
10,427
Delta is now 50% of the cases in the Tri-Cities area in Washington State.

When the border opens, B.C. will likely learn quickly enough how well its vaccination rate is helpful.

If Delta is in the Tri-Cities, it will soon enough be in Spokane. (Last I checked, vaccinations in Spokane County were less than 50%). How are vaccination rates in eastern B.C. & western Alberta? That's not a very porous border. Considering the traffic, Vancouver would still be much more likely to get hit first, though northwest Oregon & northwest Washington have high vaccination rates.

It seems like geographically, Delta is still working its way north. But it's taking over in southeast WA, and it's in Illinois.
 
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manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,613
Vancouver Metro and Victoria, rates (1 shot) is 80-90%. Kelowna and their areas, the rate is more 65-75%. Northern town have the lowest rates, with barely above 50%.
 

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