News & Experiences continued

Susan1

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This is a very sad situation. However to be fair, it doesn’t say he caught this at University of Dayton right? It says he went home to do remote learning on September 13.
Well, UD started back in late August and immediately started having a lot of cases. They were put under a Red warning (all remote - don't leave campus) till at least Sept. 14. It also says lengthy hospitalization. It doesn't say if he had any underlying conditions that caused him to want to leave. It says the same thing on every news thingie. Nothing more personal. I'm sure they were doing contact tracing here and there.

I'm hoping this will be a lesson to 18 year olds. I ran over to Kroger because it's 78* and the high tomorrow is only going to be 51*. Saw two teenage boys without masks. We're supposed to have thunderstorms tonight. The parking lot wasn't crowded. They only had two cashiers open, and they were pulling people out of line with full carts to help them do the self-checkout. I got lucky and got behind a woman with a half full big cart. She actually said this is the most I've bought in weeks. But it went fast enough. Nobody lined up behind me while I was there. And I forgot to write down milk, so I didn't get any. It wouldn't have fit in my little cart anyway. I can run over tomorrow or Sunday.
 
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MacMadame

Staying at home
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So my county had their Board of Supervisors meeting today where they were going to decide whether or not to defy the state putting us into the purple tier, which is effective tomorrow. They decided not to defy the state - as one supervisor put it, "Let's not poke the bear." It was nice to see that even though we have a very vocal and active anti-mask, "Open Up!" group, most of the people who made presentations and sent e-mails to the supervisors at and before the meeting were in favor of common sense and following health guidelines. Whew!
Sometimes the extremists are very loud. But that doesn't mean they are a majority.
 

Susan1

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4:00 news - UD won't say where he contracted the c.v. The reporter talked to students. One said she knew people there who had it and got better. And was so shocked that someone died. Another said it is a wake-up call. Another said students are not all following protocols.

Ohio hit a new record - 2,518. 23 Deaths.

Fargo, ND mayor issued a mask mandate for anyone out in public. How are they going to enforce it? Ohio doesn't.
 

Susan1

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5:00 news - Northmont/Springfield football game cancelled tonight because of a positive test.

Preble-Shawnee schools, rural county next to us, are going fully remote.
 

Dobre

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8,992

550 new cases in Oregon set daily case count record:cry:

(136 cases in Multnomah County, and the county opened bowling & skating there today??? Why? I think that is more cases than they have ever had. Plus the state is still opening more schools? This makes zero sense to me. Then we get contradictory articles. The ********* task force is recommending that Idaho close schools, and at the same time we get articles that claim there's no evidence the ***** is spreading via most schools, but the country has seen cases go up, up, up ever since they opened. To me that is the evidence. Labor Day is long since passed. We're more than 2 weeks beyond evacuations. What is the one factor in Oregon that changed before our numbers started rising & keeps on opening? Schools).

South Dakota shatters daily *********-19 record with more than 1,100 cases; 9 deaths​


Dr. Ezike breaks down in tears while giving Friday’s Illinois *********-19 death totals​

(Oh, these poor health care directors:().

Arkansas has the 2nd highest death rate in the country.

Tennessee reports 3,606 new *********-19 cases, 65 deaths, both record-high single-day increases​

 

ballettmaus

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15,827
I don't think they're not working because they're local; I think they're not working because there are more exceptions than rules, and the science behind all of these rules and exceptions is lacking.

I spoke with a friend in Berlin the other day and she said that she's under the impression that the reason why people are tired of restrictions is because there is no rhyme or reason to it, everyone is doing their own thing and they're implemented hastily and then aren't enforced or aren't enforceable.
I think I'd be tired of it in that case, too. It's already difficult to enough to keep up with two states, a county and school guidelines because they're all different.

So the herd immunity proposal it seems to me turns on one of two things, either the government taking drastic action to isolate anyone who has a risk factor from the rest of society, which strikes me as a huge and nearly impossible task, or simply trading off a more open economy for an ongoing crisis of medical resources and the disruption of many people getting sick and deaths increasing.

Its hard to see why people would go ahead and seriously advocate the proposal unless they have studies that show something that is very different from everything we've experienced with this p-demic.

The WHO Director-General has said that herd immunity has never been done as a response to an outbreak "let alone a *********" and is "scientifically and ethically problematic" and "simply unethical". https://tinyurl.com/y3hcr5nh

Sometimes the extremists are very loud. But that doesn't mean they are a majority.

Yup. The parents who wanted the school my mom works at to reopen were in a clear minority but they were yelling the loudest. And now the teachers are stuck with a hybrid model that's a complete mess and no proper equipment.
 

Dobre

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Kentucky turned red on the NPR map. (Alabama turned red also, but they have been adding a bunch of backlogged cases, some dating back through the summer).

States currently in red with 25+ cases per 100,000: North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wisconsin, Alaska, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Kentucky, Rhode Island, Utah, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Kansas, Tennessee

22 states.
 
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missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,863
Kentucky turned red on the NPR map. (Alabama turned red also, but they have been adding a bunch of backlogged cases, some dating back through the summer).

States currently in red with 25+ cases per 100,000: North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Wisconsin, Alaska, Idaho, Wyoming, Nebraska, Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois, Indiana, Missouri, Kentucky, Rhode Island, Utah, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Alabama, Kansas, Tennessee

22 states.
Out of the 22 states, 14 have Republican governors and 8 have Democratic governors.
 

Dobre

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8,992
Oklahoma has a new high of 1,800 new cases today.

399 cases in Oregon today. Multnomah County has been put back on the watchlist. (I would guess that Washington County is headed there also. They had 71 cases today. Jackson County hasn't been able to bring their numbers down since the fire either).

In Washington State, the three counties with the highest rising numbers per capita are all on the Idaho border.

Idaho shatters ********* records; St. Luke’s Magic Valley to divert child patients to Boise​


This article is from yesterday. "Kootenai County broke its record for daily confirmed ******** cases, reporting 112 (3,602 total). This came one day after Panhandle Health District board members voted 4-3 to rescind a mask mandate for the county." WTH!!! (Kootenai Health System was 99% full already when I posted about them possibly needing to send patients to Seattle or Portland the other day. This is insanity).

"Even sparsely populated Adams County — whose commissioners just signed a resolution rescinding *********-19 measures and declaring the county “back to normal” — recorded a sizable jump with 12 new cases. The county has recorded only 42 cases since the ********* began in Idaho, but its high school said Friday that two students and two staffers had tested positive." :wall:

Meanwhile St. Luke's Magic Valley has had to stop hospitalizing kids & is sending them to their children's hospital in Boise in order to make room for ********* patients.

Schools in Idaho had 96 new cases this week:(.


 
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Dobre

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'Mom code': Parents reportedly avoid testing kids to keep Utah *********-19 numbers artificially low​

Parents in Utah are avoiding having their kids tested so that schools will stay open. I would express shock . . . if I was shocked:p.

Montana is upping the ante with compliance. They have a new violation complaint form & are starting to sue businesses not complying with the mask mandate. New restrictions are anticipated to be announced next week, including a lower limit for event participation.

The Reno area of Nevada just hit a new high.

New Mexico sets single-day record with 875 ***** cases


Beshear calls Saturday’s nearly 1,800 new Kentucky ******** cases ‘frightening’​

This is a new high for Kentucky, with the exception of a data collection catch-up day earlier.

Illinois had a new high of 6,161 cases today.

Wyoming had a new high of 426 yesterday.
 

Susan1

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New high for daily number of cases - 2,858;total - 195,806 (124,130 are under 60 years old = 63%)
Total hospitalizations now over 18,000+6 (11,022 are 60+ = 61%)
ICU now over 3,700+5 (doesn't have separated by age)
Deaths now over 5,200+6 (4,773 are 60+ = 92%)

Positivity rate 10/22 - 5.7; 7 day moving average - 5.3

(and we have a republican governor)
 

Susan1

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9,457
I was looking to see if DeWine said anything about the threat (or the bad numbers) and saw this -
Our @OHNationalGuard team is in Circleville today offering free c.v. testing for anyone who would like a test. No appointment needed, just stop by between 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Second Baptist Church 443 North Court St.

trump was in Circleville today too. He hates testing.
 

MacMadame

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Talked to my Mom today. At her school, they have random C19 testing similar to random drug testing. If a student is selected for random testing and refuses to take the test, they are expelled with no tuition refund. So they are all behaving because they are afraid they will be tested and found positive and have to quarantine.

This is accompanied by lots of rah-rah, we're all in this together, it's up to you to keep school open messaging.

So far it seems to be working.
 

Prancer

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trump was in Circleville today too. He hates testing.
I'll bet he hates Circleville, too (population 13K). Not his kind of town. But definitely his kind of people.

I have scary memories of going to Circleville from my JW childhood.

Talked to my Mom today. At her school, they have random C19 testing similar to random drug testing. If a student is selected for random testing and refuses to take the test, they are expelled with no tuition refund. So they are all behaving because they are afraid they will be tested and found positive and have to quarantine.

This is accompanied by lots of rah-rah, we're all in this together, it's up to you to keep school open messaging.

So far it seems to be working.
I'm surprised no one has sued. Because that all sounds like a lawsuit just waiting to happen to me.
 

missing

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Marc Short, Mike Pence’s chief of staff, has tested positive for *********-19

In a statement, the vice president's press secretary, Devin O'Malley, said Short "began quarantine and assisting in the contact tracing process" after testing positive for the *****. Pence, who along with his wife tested negative for *********-19 on Saturday, will continue with his campaign schedule despite his close contact with Short, O’Malley added. "While Vice President Pence is considered a close contact with Mr. Short, in consultation with the White House Medical Unit, the Vice President will maintain his schedule in accordance with the CDC guidelines for essential personnel," the statement said.
 

MacMadame

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I'm surprised no one has sued. Because that all sounds like a lawsuit just waiting to happen to me.
It's a private university and they sign a contract. If they don't want to sign it, they don't have to go there. I don't see as any different than what pro athletes sign.

Marc Short, Mike Pence’s chief of staff, has tested positive for *********-19

In a statement, the vice president's press secretary, Devin O'Malley, said Short "began quarantine and assisting in the contact tracing process" after testing positive for the *****. Pence, who along with his wife tested negative for *********-19 on Saturday, will continue with his campaign schedule despite his close contact with Short, O’Malley added. "While Vice President Pence is considered a close contact with Mr. Short, in consultation with the White House Medical Unit, the Vice President will maintain his schedule in accordance with the CDC guidelines for essential personnel," the statement said.
Now I am sure Pence is a robot. Everyone around him get C19 but he never does.
 

ballettmaus

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Due to rising YKW cases, the Berlin Senate ordered that bars and restaurants must close at 11 p.m. Owners filed a lawsuit and the court lifted the restrictions. Apparently, closing early does not have a significant impact on preventing infections, so ordering bars and restaurants to close early is infringing on the owner's freedoms.

Due to YKW, the Berlin Senate wanted to grant stores two additional Sundays to the handful of Sundays that they're allowed to open throughout the year. The same court that said that forcing bars and restaurants to close early is an infringement on the owner's freedoms, said that stores can't be permitted to open. Granting permission to be open on a Sunday does not mean that all stores have to open. Only those who want to open will be open, so how is forcing them to stay closed not an infringement on the store owner's freedoms?
 

MsZem

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Due to rising YKW cases, the Berlin Senate ordered that bars and restaurants must close at 11 p.m. Owners filed a lawsuit and the court lifted the restrictions. Apparently, closing early does not have a significant impact on preventing infections, so ordering bars and restaurants to close early is infringing on the owner's freedoms.

Due to YKW, the Berlin Senate wanted to grant stores two additional Sundays to the handful of Sundays that they're allowed to open throughout the year. The same court that said that forcing bars and restaurants to close early is an infringement on the owner's freedoms, said that stores can't be permitted to open. Granting permission to be open on a Sunday does not mean that all stores have to open. Only those who want to open will be open, so how is forcing them to stay closed not an infringement on the store owner's freedoms?
These halfway measures are pretty dubious, IMO. If cases are as out of control as they are in many places in Europe, I fear that a hard reset is in order. When the CV is as widespread as it is now, it's extremely difficult to limit exposure/do effective contact tracing and mitigation. You want to get to the point where there are fewer cases so that these can be deployed effectively.

Having to do a second lockdown is a failure, but I'm with @misskarne - they do work, and sometimes they're the best choice. Though I don't know enough about the situation in Berlin to say if that's the case there.
 

Orm Irian

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These halfway measures are pretty dubious, IMO. If cases are as out of control as they are in many places in Europe, I fear that a hard reset is in order. When the CV is as widespread as it is now, it's extremely difficult to limit exposure/do effective contact tracing and mitigation. You want to get to the point where there are fewer cases so that these can be deployed effectively.

Having to do a second lockdown is a failure, but I'm with @misskarne - they do work, and sometimes they're the best choice. Though I don't know enough about the situation in Berlin to say if that's the case there.
I wouldn't call it a failure, just bad luck. But when it gets as bad as it was in Victoria a while back, and it is in many parts of Europe now, locking down is the only tool we have left that will work. A three-week or one-month circuit-breaker lockdown now could save a lot of lives and a lot of hospital systems fast. I'm not sure Wales's two-week lockdown will be quite long enough, but if it works it might give others confidence to do the same.
 

ballettmaus

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These halfway measures are pretty dubious, IMO. If cases are as out of control as they are in many places in Europe, I fear that a hard reset is in order. When the CV is as widespread as it is now, it's extremely difficult to limit exposure/do effective contact tracing and mitigation. You want to get to the point where there are fewer cases so that these can be deployed effectively.

I agree about halfway measures. The question is, what would the courts decide about shutting down the bars and restaurants completely considering that they're ruling one way for restaurants and bars and another for Sunday store openings.

My granddad said that since bars and restaurants can't sell alcohol after 11 p.m., patrons just order a bottle (or two) of whatever they want to drink right before 11 p.m. and then stay and continue to drink.

I do believe that the non-compliance is in part, due to a lack of unity at the top (the parties aren't in agreement on a federal level, and many states make their own rules and then they're made hastily and halfway) and the other part is due to a false sense of safety. Germany did fairly well with regards to deaths the first time around and Germany was one of the countries others looked to because they acted earlier and managed things fairly well. Now, there seems to be a sense of invulnerability among a certain group of people.

My friend also told me that they had little to do in their hospital back in March/April. Elective procedures weren't allowed and they had only one YKW patient. Now, their YKW floor is at capacity with patients who have moderate cases and require monitoring due to underlying conditions, their ICU is at capacity with patients who require additional oxygen and they've already sent two patients to another hospital as they're not equipped to keep patients on a ventilator.
 

MsZem

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I wouldn't call it a failure, just bad luck. But when it gets as bad as it was in Victoria a while back, and it is in many parts of Europe now, locking down is the only tool we have left that will work. A three-week or one-month circuit-breaker lockdown now could save a lot of lives and a lot of hospital systems fast. I'm not sure Wales's two-week lockdown will be quite long enough, but if it works it might give others confidence to do the same.
No, it's a failure. There are countries that have been able to keep things under control without resorting to lockdowns, and if you get to the point where that's your only option, it's a failure. Lockdowns are extremely damaging.

What is true is that there is some element of luck in terms of who has super-spreader events and who doesn't (thus the wildly different conclusions about school reopenings), but the more cases you have the higher the odds of super-spreaders.

I agree about halfway measures. The question is, what would the courts decide about shutting down the bars and restaurants completely considering that they're ruling one way for restaurants and bars and another for Sunday store openings.
I don't know what you mean by Sunday store openings, but grocery shopping is necessary while going out to bars/restaurants is not. In places where transmission is out of control, they should be shut down for everything except takeout/delivery. Likewise any non-essential stores where people can congregate.
 

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