News & Experiences continued

VGThuy

Well-Known Member
Messages
32,961

This is honestly how I see every anti-masker and anyone who thinks ********* is some politically-created tool. You know the news people who edited it were throwing some subtle shade at those protestors too. From showing the kid mindlessly repeating anti-mask rhetoric to showing some of the dumbest and most unhinged people (like the lady who said child molesters loves masks...gee I wonder where she would have gotten that from) to the dry narration of the school being confused as to why they’re being protested when it’s the governor who passed the mask mandate. The whole thing is just wild.
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
56,861
This is honestly how I see every anti-masker and anyone who thinks ********* is some politically-created tool. You know the news people who edited it were throwing some subtle shade at those protestors too. From showing the kid mindlessly repeating anti-mask rhetoric to showing some of the dumbest and most unhinged people (like the lady who said child molesters loves masks...gee I wonder where she would have gotten that from) to the dry narration of the school being confused as to why they’re being protested when it’s the governor who passed the mask mandate. The whole thing is just wild.

I have a really hard time not believing its a parody.
 

Orm Irian

Well-Known Member
Messages
837
In the past 24 hours there were no new *********-19 linked deaths reported in Victoria, and only 42 new cases. That's the first day with no deaths since 13 July.

Regional Victoria is on the path to opening up again, and Melbourne is seeing the light at the end of the tunnel get bigger. Dan Andrews may even be able to take a day off before the end of the year at this rate!
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,193
Speaking of protests, didn't they make masks mandatory for protests in Berlin?

Yeah, because those people willfully ignore the rules while gathering in big numbers.

I think Germany has a tendency to do that but a few thousand people who are protesting restrictions that aren't really there shouldn't dictate preventitive health measures. We're talking about a mask mandate and physical distancing indoors here. I think they can all manage.

hedwig and I were not talking about about a few protestants, but about the majority of people. The majority of people are ok with the current restrictions. They wouldn't be keen to have more restrictions as a preventive measure.

And no you can't physically distance indoor at schools, when all children are back, because the rooms don't magically increase in size.

And if parents in Berlin thought that kids should be wearing masks at school, they can of course make their children wear a mask anyway or if students want to wear a mask they can wear one all day long of course. Wearing masks at school more than is mandated is totally allowed. So if hords of parents thought there should be masks surely tons of people would wear them anyway?

Which, in a way, is typically German. Instead of getting out in front of it and implementing preventitive measures that will keep numbers down (mask mandate and physical distancing inside) they're waiting until cases rise. It's like (some) insurance companies - they don't pay for screenings and prophylactic doctor visits but they pay once you're sick.

Uhm, no, that's not typically German, that's a) what Hammer and dance is all about and b) it also is what has been done in pretty much all other European countries (with a lot more dancing for the most part, since they dared a lot more than Germany) and c) Germany HAS to wait until numbers rise before instituting strong restrictions. They can't just implement all sort of preventive measures to get low numbers even lower in order to win the global race for "least infections".

The restrictions in Germany are made possible under the "epidemic law" from 1950 (or by now under new laws that were made especially for the *********-19 ********* additionally). This law makes it possible to restrict human rights and freedoms in order to protect the country from epidemic threats. But those laws don't give the government unlimited freedom to implement restrictions. They have to be proportional to the current danger of the epidemic for the country. If the government impose restrictions that are considered not proportional to the current danger, then they'll be lifted by courts when people sue against them, which has happened several times (for example in one state brothels sued successfully against being closed, because other services with bodily contact are allowed to operate and when a whole county was put in a local shutdown because of an outbreak in a meat plant, the shutdown was lifted, because the court decided it was too comprehensive).

Since Germany is neither a dictatorship, nor an autocratic state, they can't just do what they want in terms of "preventive" restrictions. It has to be within the limits of laws and the Grundgesetz/German constitution.

Same in Austria btw, they for example were not even able to institute contact tracings in places like restaurants, because it's against the Austrian constitution to collect the data from customers, even if it's temporarily.
 

Hedwig

WoolSilk Fanatic
Messages
18,383
Yeah, because those people willfully ignore the rules while gathering in big numbers.



hedwig and I were not talking about about a few protestants, but about the majority of people. The majority of people are ok with the current restrictions. They wouldn't be keen to have more restrictions as a preventive measure.

And no you can't physically distance indoor at schools, when all children are back, because the rooms don't magically increase in size.

And if parents in Berlin thought that kids should be wearing masks at school, they can of course make their children wear a mask anyway or if students want to wear a mask they can wear one all day long of course. Wearing masks at school more than is mandated is totally allowed. So if hords of parents thought there should be masks surely tons of people would wear them anyway?



Uhm, no, that's not typically German, that's a) what Hammer and dance is all about and b) it also is what has been done in pretty much all other European countries (with a lot more dancing for the most part, since they dared a lot more than Germany) and c) Germany HAS to wait until numbers rise before instituting strong restrictions. They can't just implement all sort of preventive measures to get low numbers even lower in order to win the global race for "least infections".

The restrictions in Germany are made possible under the "epidemic law" from 1950 (or by now under new laws that were made especially for the *********-19 ********* additionally). This law makes it possible to restrict human rights and freedoms in order to protect the country from epidemic threats. But those laws don't give the government unlimited freedom to implement restrictions. They have to be proportional to the current danger of the epidemic for the country. If the government impose restrictions that are considered not proportional to the current danger, then they'll be lifted by courts when people sue against them, which has happened several times (for example in one state brothels sued successfully against being closed, because other services with bodily contact are allowed to operate and when a whole county was put in a local shutdown because of an outbreak in a meat plant, the shutdown was lifted, because the court decided it was too comprehensive).

Since Germany is neither a dictatorship, nor an autocratic state, they can't just do what they want in terms of "preventive" restrictions. It has to be within the limits of laws and the Grundgesetz/German constitution.

Same in Austria btw, they for example were not even able to institute contact tracings in places like restaurants, because it's against the Austrian constitution to collect the data from customers, even if it's temporarily.

Exactly. I live in Northern Germany. We have 8 Mio inhabitants in my county. At the moment we have 15 (!) people in the ICU in the whole of Niedersachsen. 15 people out of 8 Mio.

I am very much for preventive measures but even I would roll my eyes if they are tightening restrictions now.
in my son's school there is no social distancing within a class. So if any child gets sick the whole cohort has to quarantine.
this was decided so that every child can go to school every day which was a priority here in Germany.
we could have gone on with every second day so only half of the children are in school everyday but this is a huge issue obviously for the children and for all working parents.
With the numbers we have right now that would have been insane.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,193
Most bigger outbreaks here seem to be directly related to people being extremely stupid.

In an Eastern German state there was a bigger outbreak now, after a bus company returned from a vacation bus trip for senior citizens to Czech Republic. Apparently the health authorities have tons of work to do finding all the contacts of the travellers, because they also had such a sociable life after returning home from the trip.
One of the bus tourists died, a 90 year old man.

The state government said that it would be great if companies maybe didn't organise bus trips to at-risk destinations for at-risk people :scream:
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,630
The Washington Post provides a CV19 etiquette guide.

What do I do if I have to sneeze? Do I do it into my mask?

It’s important to cover your sneeze in some way. “The goal is to keep your particles away from other people, and to keep other people’s particles away from you,” Eleanor Murray, assistant professor of epidemiology at Boston University School of Public Health, told The Post’s Eliza Goren. “Whether that’s through physical distancing or a barrier of some kind, either of those will work.” So, sneeze into your mask, rather than removing it before a sneeze; then replace it with a clean one (Murray suggests always carrying more than one mask). For other ways to handle sneezing, read Goren’s story.
 

Theatregirl1122

Needs a nap
Messages
22,907
I remember doing talk radio in St George in my gun control days and the host describing Salt Lake City as extremist liberal. This is not a typical American community.

Aren’t these people who constantly wear special underwear to protect themselves from evil? But a mask to protect from germs is Too Far?
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
37,278
And if parents in Berlin thought that kids should be wearing masks at school, they can of course make their children wear a mask anyway or if students want to wear a mask they can wear one all day long of course. Wearing masks at school more than is mandated is totally allowed. So if hords of parents thought there should be masks surely tons of people would wear them anyway?
I don't think it's that simple. For one thing, masks work best to prevent you from giving the crud to other people. So if I think people should wear masks and you don't, I am more negatively impacted by a decision by someone who doesn't wear a mask than you are by mine to wear a mask.

Also, most people don't spend tons of time analyzing every decision and doing tons of research into what the experts say. So if masks aren't mandated, they most likely won't insist on their kids wearing them especially if the kids resist. They are going to assume that the experts know that they are doing. Even in these days of "experts can't be trusted!"

[/QUOTE]
With the numbers we have right now that would have been insane.
I think this is something people have forgotten. We shut down hard early on to get our numbers under control so that we wouldn't remain shut down forever. The goal has always been to open back up once it was relatively safe to do so. Not 100% safe. Relatively safe.

For me, if C19 numbers become more like flu numbers (not just lower than before but also with understood risks and an understanding of who is at risk), that's good enough. They don't have to go down to zero or near zero like Ebola and bubonic plague.

I think people have lost sight of that and are now looking at it as a race to have the smallest numbers and for no cases or at least no deaths to be "safe to open." It's fine if you personally want to stay home until those numbers are reached, but I don't think it's realistic for the government to enforce such numbers on the general populace. We know enough to know that an R0 of less than 1 means cases will go down, not up, for example. Keeping everything shut down when the R0 is less than 1 is wrong IMO.

We also have a much better idea of what numbers cause exponential growth in cases and deaths than we used to. So we can afford to let the numbers go up a bit and not get back to where we were when we were in crisis mode. Especially if tests and PPE and contact tracing is adequate to control outbreaks.

(I say "we" but I mean "places that are using science and data and experts to make decisions". So that leaves out anyplace that has let politics corrupt the process. And any place that hasn't done the work to be able to control outbreaks.)

We also have a better idea of what can and cannot be open safely.

All of this helps us in the goal to get back to normal without resulting in another Italy or NYC.

The state government said that it would be great if companies maybe didn't organise bus trips to at-risk destinations for at-risk people :scream:
As I said, most people don't do elaborate risk-benefit analysis for these things. (Which is good as they don't have the expertise to do it correctly anyway.) They will assume if it's open, that it's safe as long as it "feels" safe.

There has to be a bit of faith that the government is only opening up what is safe. Unfortunately, I have no faith at all in that in much of the US and even in my own state some things are open and some things are closed that raise an eyebrow. I just have to hope they know what they are doing because I'm not going to get a degree in epidemiology just so I can decide if it's safe to get a haircut.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,193
As I said, most people don't do elaborate risk-benefit analysis for these things. (Which is good as they don't have the expertise to do it correctly anyway.) They will assume if it's open, that it's safe as long as it "feels" safe.

I think thr problem with the organized bus travels is that the vacation bus companies earn all their money with that. Mostly only old people really do those organized bus trips here. They are very popular. so obviously the bus companies will offer them, they want to survive. The old people might not even care that much about the ***** (maybe if you are 90, it's really not so important to you anymore which risks you take). And the numbers in Prague exploded only in the last few weeks, when the trip was planned it might not even have been an "at risk" country. And for the government it seems much more difficult to impose restrictions on travel and of course there's no possibility at all to restrict what people are doing in other countries.

I don't think it's that simple. For one thing, masks work best to prevent you from giving the crud to other people. So if I think people should wear masks and you don't, I am more negatively impacted by a decision by someone who doesn't wear a mask than you are by mine to wear a mask.

I know that, I just meant to say that if most parents in Berlin were so uncontent with the rules at school, I suppose they would or could take some action, like complain to the school about the rules or organize themselves or refuse to send their children. But if the situation is anything like here or where Hedwig lives, I think most parents are simply completely fine with masks not being mandatory all the time.

And maybe ballettmaus' friend or aquantaince knows a school with expecially bad hygiene rules. Generally all schools work out their own concept based on teh guidelines and I'm sure some have good concepts and some are so so and I'm sure there's also ones who are really bad at it. But then I think one would have to complain as a parent and try to get some changes done. It might not be representative of all schools.

I'm not sure why the young children thing is appearing so differently in different areas of the world.

Switzerland opened their kindergardens and schools very early, without much distance and without masks back then. Then their numbers rose a lot due to night clubs and discotheques and vacation travel. But they still say young children are not really affected. Only like 1 percent of positive infections there are children under 9 according to them. I don't really know why the experiences with young children are so different in Northern and middle Europe than for example in Israel or the United States. It might be the lower positivity rate (even though Switzerland has 3,3%, so quite a bit higher than Germany), but afaik even in Sweden young children weren't much of a problem, after all they never closed their kindergardens and schools for young children.

And the experts and doctors and the education ministers here are making mask recommendations for schools based on the experiences that were made here and as long as the infection numbers are low they just think the disadvantages of wearing a mask all day during classes outweigh the benefit. It's seen critical especially for shy children or when language learning and for concentration and becoming tired. Those factors are just weighed higher here I think. In most states children over 9 have to wear a mask when not seated in the classroom, in some states younger children have to do that too and some states had temporarily made masks mandatory also during class after the summer holidays ended.It's mostly the "during classes" where it's seen controversial.
My state started without masks yesterday, but in regions where the numbers get over a warning limit, then the mask rules would become stricter.

In Germany so far when children have been infected in school, tehy have been infected by teachers or pre-school/kindergarten teachers, therefor those are required to wear masks earlier. So far there is only one case in all of Germany known where a child infected an adult at school, this case was then given to be further studied in detail.

It would be interesting to know how schools are run/operating/doing in Asia for example. Somehow all those news articles about how Asian countries are managing the ********* seem to have disappeared unless something really unexpected happens :lol:
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,630
New York and New Jersey have given the official okay to trick or treating.

Gov. Andrew Cuomo told News 12 Long Island he’ll offer his “advice and guidance” and then let families decide whether they’ll celebrate Halloween. The announcement came after officials in Los Angeles County, California, recently announced— and then walked back — that traditional would be banned.

Gov. Phil Murphy has said as recently as last week that “Halloween’s still on in New Jersey."

“I would not ban trick-or-treaters going door to door. I don’t think that’s appropriate,” Cuomo said. “You have neighbors. If you want to go knock on your neighbors' door, God bless you. I’m not going to tell you not to.”

New Jersey is slated to take a similar route.
 

Lemonade20

Former Kurtholic
Messages
454
I still haven't decided what to do for Halloween yet. We normally have over two hundred kids, but I don't know if I want to risk celebrating Halloween by handing out treats.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,978
September 15, 2020

Cases - 24 hour - 1,001 / 21 day average - 1,095
Hosp. - 103 / 73
ICU - 14 / 10

Deaths - 103 / 73 - third highest ever; explanation for high number - coroners have up to 6 months to report deaths (me - so what is the point of the 24 hour thing?) Showed chart of "deaths reported by date of death" back to May 3. Was that our first death? Anyway, 83% of the deaths have happened in the last month.

Occurrences per 100K population -
#3 - Butler (Miami U.)
#6 - first time on "top" <they should call it "worst"> 10 - Athens (Ohio U.)
#7 - Franklin (OSU)
#8 - Montgomery (UD)
#11 - just missed the top 10 - Clark (Wittenberg)

20 new inductees into the Veterans Hall of Fame - total 895 (virtual ceremony 11/5). Happy birthday to Asa Newman, who was a Tuskegee Airman in World War II, who will be 102.

Three new charts I will have to find that are not on his twitter of Ohio compared to our bordering states: cases per 100K, testing per 100K and positivity by state - different colored line charts.

Director of Aging on nursing home, assisted living and adult day center testing - they test symptomatic people, asymptomatic staff (if positive, all staff and residents are tested), and routine staff testing. They have to be compliant with testing requirements. National Guard is still picking up and delivering to labs. 160+ staff and residents at nursing homes, 80K+ at 770 assisted living tested a minimum of every other week. Identified problem with the testing and will start back next week. Still having outside visitation. Dashboard on indoor visitation coming soon.

Adult day centers (senior centers) to open back up 9/21 with staff tested minimally every other week. Staff and participants come and go, and they have the protocols to follow (masks, distancing, hygiene, etc.).

No Lt. Gov., but new initiative - Ohio To Work - people looking for jobs, reskill and restart careers.

Thinking of people facing the hurricane (and I've heard more giant planes going to Wright Patt yesterday and today). 21 people from the Ohio Dept. of Natural Resources have been assisting fire departments in California, Colorado, Wyoming, Oregon and Arizona.

Brookville superintendent (rural in northwest Montgomery county) - 1,500 students all back in school for 4 weeks. 90% of parents voted for in school. Going well. Students, staff and employees are happy to be back. DeWine asked about anything special they were doing. They have split lunches, and rented 60 picnic tables so kids can eat outside every other day (he didn't say what happens when they have to eat inside - maybe half eat outside M, W, F, and the other half eat outside T, TH?). Everyone got a refrigerator magnet with guidelines and positive thoughts.

Vandalia Butler (also in Montgomery county) - 3,000 students have been in person for three weeks this past Friday. 84% of parents voted for in person. He said the online/remote system has had hiccups, so I don’t know if that means they were going to have some remote/hybrid and can't or what. A grandparent who is also a doctor read about how much safer it is outside, so the district rented four 30x60 tents from a party rental. Two at the PK-3rd grade buildings, one at the 4th and 5th grade building, and one at the 6-8th (mid-school) grade building. They have been used for the disability programs, mid-school band, the mid-school had a staff meeting in theirs yesterday. One PK-3rd building has their playground divided into quadrants per grade. The other isn't going to get to go the pumpkin patch, so the pumpkins will be brought to them and they can go out one at a time to pick them out.

Talks to College and University presidents all the time: It's not the classroom, cafeteria or dorms causing the spread. If you want to stay, you need to take precautions.

Questions - At least none of the reporters asked the same question about colleges this time.

Cleveland.com - Sunday, bars were full of people watching football and there weren't many citations. Thursday night, the Browns play the Bengals (me- fyi-big deal in Ohio). Are you concerned? We just tell people to be careful. Liquor control agents are going out. Just had the first bar lose its liquor license. (me-I had to look it up - Akron.) Help bar owners out and do your part. The Bengals/Browns game will have 6K fans sitting in quadrants.

I'll lump all the Dr. Duwve questions together, which he didn't even address in his original remarks.

First, the reporter's second question - Halloween? Doesn't know.

Didn't write down who - Didn't you tell Dr. Duwve about the harassment Dr. Acton received. Did you tell her the truth?

Online article, faster than trying to make complete sentences out of my notes - "He claimed Duwve was informed of what happened with Acton before she initially took the job, but added he believes her concerns are real and "respects" her decision to step away. "I take people at face value. Sometimes, you don't fully grasp things until you kind of get into something...but I'm only speculating. We were open with her."

Someone asked if what happened to Dr. Acton will deter other candidates from the job. (Me - only another female with a family.)

Same article - "I don't recall having anyone else express to me that they had a concern about not serving because of that reason," DeWine said, although he did admit others had told him they "weren't interested" for unspecified reasons. "If the question is 'Can we find...a very good person to serve as health director?' the answer, certainly, is yes."

Jim Otte (WHIO here) - Will the protests and harassment make it harder for you to find someone. DeWine - have seen protests throughout the country . They are divisive. We are no different than other states. (me-I haven't been paying attention anywhere else, what other health directors had to quit their jobs because people protested outside their homes?) People at the health department are good. Some have been there a long time and some have been borrowed from other departments. We partner with colleges and universities like OSU, UC, Case and the Cleveland Clinic. I ask for something and they are right there.

Adrienne Robbins, WCHM, Columbus - what does it say about our state to people who might want to move here when they have to put up with abuse? People have strong opinions. There are great opportunities. He said his good friend John McCain used to say to devote yourself to a cause that is bigger than yourself. And he was going on and on and I couldn't wait anymore and had to go to the bathroom. TMI. When I got back, he was still saying something about an important cause. (me-so people are supposed to put their mental and physical health and families in danger to work here?)

Ohio Capital Journal read this quote from a book about the 1918 pan--ic (I wrote keywords and then looked it up) - “Society cannot function if it is every man for himself. By definition, civilization cannot survive that. Those in authority must retain the public's trust. The way to do that is to distort nothing, to put the best face on nothing, to try to manipulate no one.” Do you think the president didn't learn that lesson. (Woo hoo!) Of course, DeWine wimped out. He said HE has tried to be as open as he can. We learn as we go. Evolves, blah blah, blah. Not going to critique the president. Has a 2 hour call with VP and sometimes trump every week. So I have to get along - yeah, that part was me.

Xenia Gazette - no stamped ballots. DeWine wanted it, but Sec. of State is doing a good job. Everyone has received an absentee ballot request. Send it in. HIS AND FRAN'S ARE STILL SITTING ON THE TABLE. Geez. He likes to vote in person. (me - you can send in the request. You don't have to use the mail-in ballot once it gets there. What if things get really bad and no one can vote in person, like in the primary?)

Somebody - schools did not get graded in the spring and they won't this fall. (me-just get through this first?). DeWine - schools should be graded and students assessed. There have to be enough tests to measure where we are. Parents need to know. But not sure it's that important considering the consequences. Federal law dictates some tests.

Don't know if I can - certain Jack from Mansfield. Long rant and quote. Federal judge struck down something in PA about masks, business restrictions and no gatherings mandates being unconstitutional. Why is that (or not? I was lost) binding in Ohio? You say people have to earn their freedom by doing those things. Is freedom really earned? Or some load of horse pucky. DeWine said he doesn't know anything about the PA statute. No official's power is unlimited. Stick a sock in it. (guess who!)

Cinc Enquirer - antigen tests? Spoke with lab people yesterday. It is a part of our overall strategy. Waiting on private sector development.

Columbus Dispatch - when will the school c.v. data report come out. Next week. The media is already reporting what their schools are experiencing. Stop being such a nosy ghoul. (yeah, that last one was me again. )

Bloomberg - trump claims to be responsible for the auto plant boom in Ohio and Michigan. WTF (that's not what he said, that's what I heard!) DeWine said they are going to build electric trucks at the Lordstown plant next year. (me-Trump will brag about that for the rest of his life. Did he actually have anything to do with it? President Biden can be there for the ribbon cutting. ha ha )

Toledo - Putnam county has filed a lawsuit against wearing masks. They are the #1 county on the per occurrence chart. DeWine said he's been sued before, and "anybody can file anything".

Will you be joining Mike Pence in Zanesville? No.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,997
And no you can't physically distance indoor at schools, when all children are back, because the rooms don't magically increase in size.

No they don't. But they aren't increasing anywhere and there are schools that have managed to figure things out by adjusting and adopting. But, of course, in order to figure things out one has to put in the work and Berlin's Senator of Education certainly did not do that over the summer.


And if parents in Berlin thought that kids should be wearing masks at school, they can of course make their children wear a mask anyway or if students want to wear a mask they can wear one all day long of course. Wearing masks at school more than is mandated is totally allowed. So if hords of parents thought there should be masks surely tons of people would wear them anyway?

I'm not sure what you're saying.


Uhm, no, that's not typically German,

Well, in my experience, it is. Germany likes to take a "let's wait and see" approach.


Germany HAS to wait until numbers rise before instituting strong restrictions. They can't just implement all sort of preventive measures to get low numbers even lower in order to win the global race for "least infections".

All sorts? I'm simply talking about an indoor mask mandate.


The restrictions in Germany are made possible under the "epidemic law" from 1950 (or by now under new laws that were made especially for the *********-19 ********* additionally). This law makes it possible to restrict human rights and freedoms in order to protect the country from epidemic threats. But those laws don't give the government unlimited freedom to implement restrictions.

What freedom is curbed when you have to wear a mask indoors in order to protect others and yourself as well?
I think no one is more particular about their personal freedoms than Americans and I think there are few governments who have a Constitution that protects personal freedoms as much as the US Constitution does but if governors can issue mask mandates in a country where Nazi language and symbols fall under freedom of speech then I'm sure German states can, too.


They have to be proportional to the current danger of the epidemic for the country.

You think that an indoor mask mandate is disproportionate when indoors is considered the biggest risk due to aerosol spread and masks reduce the spread by at least 60% (and also protect the wearer because the wearer will get a lower viral load should they get the *****)?


Since Germany is neither a dictatorship, nor an autocratic state, they can't just do what they want in terms of "preventive" restrictions. It has to be within the limits of laws and the Grundgesetz/German constitution.

I lived there until last October and am still a citizen of Germany and even if I weren't, I'm not stupid but thanks for telling me that Germany is not an autocratic state. (And I didn't know that an indoor mask mandate to protect people from a new and deadly disease is equivalent to autocracy :rolleyes:).
 

Orm Irian

Well-Known Member
Messages
837
Another 42 cases in Victoria today, and 8 deaths. Regional Victoria is opening up today; here's hoping it won't be too long until Melbourne joins them.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,997
You could just put a bowl of candy outside & replenish as needed. Quite a few people around here do that.

We'll talk to our neighbor (who has kids and basically knows all the other neighbors with kids) what the plans are but it'll likely be what we'll do this year, too.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,630
Ever the optimist, Trump figures "herd mentality" will solve the problem.


Joe Scarborough

@JoeNBC
· 2h
Donald Trump battles the English language in an attempt to let voters know he now supports herd immunity (3 million US deaths) as the solution to *********: “You’re going to develop, you’re going to develop herd mentality; it’s going to be, going to be herd developed.”
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,123
I did that once and someone stole the bowl.

I'm still bitter. It was a cheap bowl but I used it a lot for food prep.


I guess we could invest in plastic gladware?

I'm not too concerned about my bowls. I have a feeling the candy may disappear more rapidly than normal. Also, I'm not currently shopping in supermarkets where they stock a lot of candy. So...we'll see.

I rather liked the idea that was floating around of having the kids dress up & wait in their yards while people drive around in their cars and throw candy into the yards like a parade. Of course, this would not work for the kids from out of town or in apartments. But it was a nice idea anyway.
 

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