News & Experiences continued

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,306
Local senior living centers -
Montgomery county
"Officials said there are 10 cases involving residents and six staff members."
Preble county
"At this time, there are 15 positive, but asymptomatic residents, as well as two employees who have tested positive through the (RT)-PCR test."
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
Messages
21,238
I am a "minister" and licensed to perform marriages in my state. I have suddenly become very popular, as others are backing out of performing ceremonies and word has gotten around that I can do it.

Um, but why would I want to?
Not just that other officiants are opting out, but I'm seeing the wedding industry is pushing harder and harder now - the venues and all the other vendors (caterers, florists etc) who had their summers fully booked since last year, now trying to pick up the pieces. I've seen restaurants now advertise private parties only, or as an option they never offered before, and certainly hotels who need to make up for all those empty guest rooms and restaurants by filling up their ballrooms - because it's not going to be business meetings and conferences for some time.

Businesses are getting creative now - more and more hotels are offering "work from here" options for extended stays or even day packages, and in fact whole countries are offering incentives for people to relocate and "work from here" - including Barbados and Bermuda.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,684
It didn't have to be this way. The ***** is not going away, I get that, as does everyone I know. But 167,000 and rising Americans didn't have to die. Sure there would be deaths, but many of them could have been prevented.

And still people are going out to parties, beaches, bars and now colleges and primary schools when we have not flatten or decreased the curve. We could have used the last 6-7 months doing that, we didnt.

It didn't have to be this way :fragile:
 

skatfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
4,886
The amount of testing in my county has gone down at least 50 percent in the last two weeks. Today we had 91 cases reported for about 160 tests -all related to some testing on Aug 1st somewhere.

Percent positive rate is still about 15% so why in a county in AZ has our testing dropped? No more drive through testing and folks figuring that delays of 10 days are pretty useless. 😒
 

YukiNieve

Well-Known Member
Messages
952
My close friend just called me this morning and I have been wondering what to say to her...

- What would you do if your child who is a young adult and has been dating with someone observing social distance and putting masks on, and then they told you that they want to have more intimate relationship. Do you just tell them "wait" ? But how long?
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
36,436
The amount of testing in my county has gone down at least 50 percent in the last two weeks. Today we had 91 cases reported for about 160 tests -all related to some testing on Aug 1st somewhere.

Percent positive rate is still about 15% so why in a county in AZ has our testing dropped? No more drive through testing and folks figuring that delays of 10 days are pretty useless. 😒
I was just looking at the stats again for the US last night. CA really is doing the most per capita testing of any state which makes our cases high but our case rate is lower than AZ who is currently in the #1 slot for per capital cases.

My close friend just called me this morning and I have been wondering what to say to her...

- What would you do if your child who is a young adult and has been dating with someone observing social distance and putting masks on, and then they told you that they want to have more intimate relationship. Do you just tell them "wait" ? But how long?
There are so many responses to this. :D But let's set aside everything except safety.

I think it could be done safely if that's her friend's concern. If they live somewhere that is not a hotspot, they could invite the other family into their pod. Where I am, we are allowed to form pods outside our household but they must contain 12 or fewer people.

So basically there has to be an agreement between her family and theirs that they will not socialize outside the pod. And she'd have to believe both parties would honor the agreement.
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
14,662
Businesses are getting creative now - more and more hotels are offering "work from here" options for extended stays or even day packages, and in fact whole countries are offering incentives for people to relocate and "work from here" - including Barbados and Bermuda.
Friends of mine, who had to cancel their wedding, ended up having a small, socially distanced, family-only ceremony and then used all the money they saved to honeymoon and then work from Aruba for a few months.

Cortina d'Ampezzo, where I just visited, has a city tourism campaign encouraging people to remote work from Cortina.

I hate to say it, because I'm doing it, too, but the current restrictions are just widening the gap between rich and poor. People with money can relocate somewhere with looser restrictions, often improving their tax position, while those without money remain trapped in place (and will likely face big tax bills now that the rich are taking their money and running). High-tax places like NYC, California, etc. could seriously see local governments collapse or default on debt as the net-payers flee and the net-takers multiply. Even a handful of the wealthiest people relocating could create massive budget shortfalls.
 

VALuvsMKwan

Wandering Goy
Messages
7,033
Friends of mine, who had to cancel their wedding, ended up having a small, socially distanced, family-only ceremony and then used all the money they saved to honeymoon and then work from Aruba for a few months.

Cortina d'Ampezzo, where I just visited, has a city tourism campaign encouraging people to remote work from Cortina.

I hate to say it, because I'm doing it, too, but the current restrictions are just widening the gap between rich and poor. People with money can relocate somewhere with looser restrictions, often improving their tax position, while those without money remain trapped in place (and will likely face big tax bills now that the rich are taking their money and running). High-tax places like NYC, California, etc. could seriously see local governments collapse or default on debt as the net-payers flee and the net-takers multiply. Even a handful of the wealthiest people relocating could create massive budget shortfalls.
Being a Master of the Universe hath its privileges, no?
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
Messages
21,238
I hate to say it, because I'm doing it, too, but the current restrictions are just widening the gap between rich and poor.
More like exposing what already exists I think. If you're rich enough, you can find ways to evade taxes and otherwise protect your money, you can travel more freely, and if you want you can buy citizenship or passports in other countries, not to mention own property there. Nothing new there.

But on the bright side, destinations that depend on tourism and face economic disaster without it are finding ways to attract visitors, who will pay rent or hotels and otherwise spend locally, and keep local citizens working.

It would be interesting to know how many people are actually doing this, and what positive impacts there are in the places they choose to do it.
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
14,662
Buying a decent passport usually costs in the neighborhood of $2mm cash, minimum, and usually comes with residency requirements. Most people with jobs, even exec jobs, usually couldn't just move to Malta or Cyprus to invest a few million, pre-*********.

Just for clarity: I'm still paying normal UK taxes, and I do not nor have I ever taken advantage of the "overseas workday relief" program. I don't think it's ethical, even it's legal, so I do not participate in it. I do think U.S. states with Robin Hood style taxation are about to have a rude awakening as to what happens when the rich leave.....

Re: tourism, it's strange. I've seen more people in a tiny town - Brixen, or "Bressanone" if you choose to use the Italianized name, on a rainy Monday than I have in St. Mark's Square in Venice on a picture perfect Saturday. The more international the destination, the emptier it is. The more local, the packed it is. Seems like it's all Italian, Austrian, and German tourists here (with the occasional Dutch) travelling primarily by car and sometimes by train.

Venice was a ghost town, with only Italian spoken anywhere and all of the businesses that usually sell cheap sh*t to American/Chinese/etc. tourists completely shut.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,306
Ohio - 8/11/20

DeWine said this was going to be the back to school press conference. And also that he couldn't do the sign language on a screen from home, but gave the place where people could access it. I'm guessing someone would have had to tell those people because he had his head down while he was talking so they couldn't read his lips.

The Ohio Dept. of Corrections Director has recovered and can "go back" to work. She has been working from home.

Cases - 102,826 / 24 hour - 1,095 / 21 day average - 1,220
Hospitalizations - 11,760 / 131 / 96 (989 still in hospital)
ICU - 2,699 / 19 / 16 (338 still in ICU / 172 still on vents)

Deaths - 3,708 / 35 / 23 (see? Sunday there was 1 death reported. They are just catching up from the weekend.)

Six states on the positivity over 15% map - AZ, NV, ID, FL, MS, AL - must 14 day quarantine if you go there. We are only 5.1% as of 8/9.

Ohio counties ranked by Highest Occurrence - Mercer is the highest. In the top 10, only Lucas-Toledo (#4) and Franklin-Columbus (#8) are not rural counties. Several counties noted flea markets as a spreader. More Thursday.

Age Groups - 0-19 are still the highest percentage - June - 24.0%, July - 24.3%, August (thru 8/10) - 19.4%.

Map of how schools are returning as of 8/6 so numbers approximate. (And the numbers don't add up to 100 because of different sized districts. Most of the Cleveland and Columbus areas were all remote. There were also some white spots on the map, which meant no decision given yet.) Public schools only.

38% or 325 districts in class full time (~590K students)
25.6% or 55 all remote (~389K students)
24.5% or 154 will be doing hybrid learning (~380K students)

Three different Pediatricians spoke and stuck around for questions. There are (only) 6 children's hospitals in Ohio.

#1 from Columbus - They test all children (0-18) who come to the hospital for surgery or outpatient whether they have symptoms or not. They have tested ~14K with symptoms = 8.6% positive. Since mid-March they have tested ~20K asymptomatic patients = 1.4%. However, last week the rate was up to 2.0%. 8% have been hospitalized and 1% of those to the ICU. He said some because of pre-existing conditions like obesity and diabetes. Minorities have a 4-6X higher rate.

As of 7 a.m. this morning, there were no cases in the Children's ICUs. And 17 and 18 year olds have the highest positive because they are the most mobile and social. (me - do 17 and 18 year olds go to a Children's hospital?) There have been 13 cases of multi-symptom inflammatory syndrome.

Dr. #2 from Cincinnati - going back to school, five things in order of importance that together have a cumulative effect - masks, distancing, hand hygiene, cleaning surfaces, ventilation (outdoors is best). The minimum standard is 6 ft. distance and 15 minutes or less. Younger children cause more spread because they need more closeness and length of care. She talked about mental health. Adults need to model the behavior for children to follow.

Dr. #3 from Dayton (I've seen him on our local news) - he had a bunch of slides of evidence-based guidance. He called them protocols and algorithms. The first one was like a flow chart. If this, then arrow over here; if not, arrow down, etc. He had three scenarios - bus, classroom, sports - if, who isolates or gets tested; if not, same questions. DeWine asked about variables. Hard to determine impact of contact length (5 minutes three times or 15 minutes at once), look at intensity (volleyball playing, etc.)

Husted said all the going back to school was good, etc. He has 2 school age daughters. They say "back up, mask up, wash up".

Questions -

If Franklin Co. is still red, can they play football? And what about buses? DeWine didn't answer the football question. He talked again about how Franklin county is such a young county and people are out and about more. Dr. #2 said as long as children are spread out and face forward and wear masks and practice good hand hygiene before getting on the bus, they should be o.k. (me - alrighty then)

Kids with allergies, asthma and sinus problems are not exempt from wearing masks? DeWine said he has spoken to Pulmonologists, who all agree that they do not interfere with breathing and that the protection for people who have breathing problems already far outweighs the risk.

Pictures of kids in crowded hallways = dangerous? Dr. #2 said kids are usually not in the hallways between classes (me - what about before and after school?) for more than 10 minutes. Schools should stagger schedules. Dr. #1 said that's why masks are a priority.

Football coaches have already submitted season plans. Will he decide they can't play. DeWine said what do they do if they are not doing sports? (me - homework? I keep wondering about schools that are doing remote learning only. Do those kids then go to the school for sports practice?) DeWine said sports teach discipline, but this year will be a different kind of discipline. Their life choices out of school will dictate if they get sick and can't play sports or cause their teammates to get sick and can't play sports. (me - never mind if they get sick and can't complete their schoolwork. It would be safer if nobody played sports.)

A question about the economy got in there. DeWine thinks there is a deal to be had between Congress and the white house. Thinks trump did the right thing. So, huh? There is nothing in Ohio's unemployment fund, so the extra $100s would have to be taken out of somewhere but not testing and tracing.

Reporter said people were telling her it was taking a week or more to get tests back. "Your PCR test came back the same day." They work on this every day. Tests are going to national labs that are backed up but they are closing the gaps. "Hospitals are strangled" and can't get enough reagents. Again, we haven't been a hot spot so we are not a priority. Is in discussion with a company for saliva tests.

The numbers from long term care facilities are being published. (I don't think this is the same person who was complaining every week to see them.) Would he consider doing that with schools. Will look into it. It would come from the districts. But they have an obligation to keep parents informed, and still protect rights and privacy.

Kids have been more isolated since March, how do you have enough data to evaluate the risk of going back to school? Dr. #2 - from stories, like that camp that had the outbreak. There is a lot of uncertainty, but we have learned a lot from hospitals in this time. Dr. #1 - schools in other countries have opened. Do what they did successfully. (me - too late for that). Dr. #2 - a school in Israel was doing well, but they had a heat wave and then had a spread.

What about teachers who have medical conditions or chose to quit or retire? Staffing is a concern. DeWine talked to some superintendents whose at risk teachers will teach remotely. (me - try getting a sub at a school with an outbreak)

Watch out for each other. And there was a cartoon commercial with the "back up, mask up, wash up" for kids.
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,092
British Columbia: 46 new cases, no additional deaths (11th straight day). Only 8 in hospital, but 5 of whom are in ICU.
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
14,671
Two-thirds of San Quentin have had YKW. They still have new cases. https://tinyurl.com/y493js3e

*********-19 spread unchecked across California’s oldest prison in ways that stunned public health experts, despite efforts to control the disease. As of Monday, there had been more than 2,200 cases and 25 deaths, among a population of more than 3,260 people. On Sunday, a guard became one of the latest to die.

...

That means more than two-thirds of the prison’s population has been infected, said Dr. George Rutherford, epidemiologist and infectious diseases expert at UC San Francisco.

And though new cases have slowed, they are still occurring — with 60 reported in the last two weeks — suggesting herd immunity has not yet been achieved.

San Quentin’s death toll translates to a mortality rate of about 767 people dying out of every 100,000 persons.

If that same rate occurred across California, that would translate to a staggering 300,000 deaths statewide — many times larger than California’s cumulative death toll of more than 10,400. Nationally, that would be equivalent to 2.5 million deaths;
 

canbelto

Well-Known Member
Messages
3,950
Huge reporting day today. Over 1500 deaths according to worldometer with 4 states in triple digits (CA, FL, TX and GA). This is horrible.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,506
Huge reporting day today. Over 1500 deaths according to worldometer with 4 states in triple digits (CA, FL, TX and GA). This is horrible.
Tuesdays are always the worst because weekend deaths get underreported. They average out during the course of 7 days.

Florida and California are going to have underreported positive cases, California due to incompetence and Florida (and possibly the Carolinas) because of the hurricane closing down testing sites. So those numbers should go up. Testing is also noticeably down in Texas, which could be because fewer people feel the need to be tested or because testing has gotten harder to do or because people are reluctant to be tested for fear they're positive and will lose their jobs. My cynical attitude is red state governors are going to do what they can to keep testing as low as possible.

What I found most disturbing was Georgia's reported 122 fatalities, NC's 63 and SC's 49, Alabama's 50, and the Veterans Affairs 60. The VA has a total reported death number of 2337 and no one seems to be upset about it.
 
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Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,789
Testing is also noticeably down in Texas, which could be because fewer people feel the need to be tested or because testing has gotten harder to do or because people are reluctant to be tested for fear they're positive and will lose their jobs.
There is some controversy in Texas because the state does not count positive antigen tests as confirmed cases.

Fact-check: Why did Texas remove 3,000 cases from its ******** count?

Gov. Greg Abbott says state will categorize same results from types of *********-19 tests differently


Anyway, per the bottom article, the state is hoping to use more of these rapid antigen tests to increase testing. Positive results for them will be listed as "probable" cases.
 

Miezekatze

Well-Known Member
Messages
15,109
Buying a decent passport usually costs in the neighborhood of $2mm cash, minimum, and usually comes with residency requirements. Most people with jobs, even exec jobs, usually couldn't just move to Malta or Cyprus to invest a few million, pre-*********.

Just for clarity: I'm still paying normal UK taxes, and I do not nor have I ever taken advantage of the "overseas workday relief" program. I don't think it's ethical, even it's legal, so I do not participate in it. I do think U.S. states with Robin Hood style taxation are about to have a rude awakening as to what happens when the rich leave.....

Re: tourism, it's strange. I've seen more people in a tiny town - Brixen, or "Bressanone" if you choose to use the Italianized name, on a rainy Monday than I have in St. Mark's Square in Venice on a picture perfect Saturday. The more international the destination, the emptier it is. The more local, the packed it is. Seems like it's all Italian, Austrian, and German tourists here (with the occasional Dutch) travelling primarily by car and sometimes by train.

Venice was a ghost town, with only Italian spoken anywhere and all of the businesses that usually sell cheap sh*t to American/Chinese/etc. tourists completely shut.
I don't think that's very surprising, since even in normal years the typical South Tirole tourists are from Germany, Italy and Austria and it's easily reachable by car, so it's still a perfect destination this year, if one wants to travel.
Everybody I know who is going on vacation this year from Germany who I know, is choosing one of the attractive sea or mountain destinations that you can reach by car, so it's either the Baltic sea, the North Sea (Germany or Netherlands) or Bavaria, Austria, South Tirole (also know some people who have chosen Switzerland, despite it being very expensive)

Places like Venice usually thrive from very international tourists that I guess mostly arrive by train or cruise ships, so obviously they are all missing ...

But maybe things will look a little bit better right now, because the 2 most southern German states have summer vacation now and their travel season is only starting and Lake Garda is very popular with tourists from here.
Maybe at leasrt some of the people who are going to Lake Garda now, will dare a visit to Venice. But I think people are still a bit wary of big cities.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,506
It has occurred to me that I must be a masochist to be seeking out these sorts of articles first thing in the morning. But hey, you only hurt the ones you love.

So I can only assume this particular Florida sheriff must love a lot of people.


Billy Woods, the sheriff of central Florida’s Marion County, banned masks for all deputies and visitors to the sheriff’s office starting Tuesday, according to a new report from the Ocala Star Banner—a strange decision to make in the middle of a ********* that’s still wildly out of control.

Sheriff Woods has instructed staff not to wear masks while on duty and said that any public visitors to the sheriff’s office, which currently employs about 900 people, should be told that masks are banned. Anyone who doesn’t want to remove their mask will be told to leave, according to a memo written by Woods and obtained by the Ocala Star Banner.

“Effective immediately, any individual walking in to any one of our lobbies (which includes the main office and all district offices) that is wearing a mask will be asked to remove it,” Woods wrote.
 

missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,506
Bars and restaurants, caught between a wide variety of rocks and hard places.

In Louisiana, roughly a quarter of the state’s 2,360 cases since March that were outside of places like nursing homes and prisons have stemmed from bars and restaurants, according to state data. In Maryland, 12% of new cases last month were traced to restaurants, contact tracers there found, and in Colorado, 9% overall have been traced to bars and restaurants...

While millions of restaurant and bar employees who were laid off during lockdowns have been desperate to get back to work, many have found themselves caught between bosses who want them back as soon as possible and customers who balk at following safety rules, like mask wearing and maintaining social distancing...

“Restaurants generate a lot of sales and payroll tax revenue, so some of the pressure came from city and state governments,” said Daniel Patterson, a chef and a restaurateur in California, where cases exploded this summer. “And I think one of the factors behind the quick openings is that our society sees restaurants as disposable and those who work in them as disposable, so in general, people are less concerned with restaurant worker safety than they are with their own needs. They want a taco and a cold beer when they want it.”
 

Immortelle

Well-Known Member
Messages
842
Another new case in NZ, seems to be school-related. I’m not sure if it’s related to the Auckland family cluster or not.
In other Antipodean news, the stranded ACT residents have finally been allowed to transit through NSW to get home. Victoria had its highest total daily deaths so far yesterday and further increases are expected. The government is copping a grilling about bungled hotel quarantines and poor (read non-existent) aged care infection/pndmc control policy. NSW is trying to prevent the dams from bursting - literally because of the rain, and figuratively due to the steady rise in cases.
Meanwhile QLD looks to have dodged a bullet again and SA, WA, TAS and NT appear to be chugging along OK.
 

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