News & Experiences continued

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
Messages
50,336
She sent us to school when we were sick. Period.
I volunteered in the elementary school clinic for years and can attest that many parents send their kids to school sick.

Part of it is that a lot of workplaces are more understanding of parents who are called to come and get their kids when the parents are at work than they are if the parents call in and say they have to stay home with sick kids. Which says a lot about those workplaces.

Part of it is that some parents think they are teaching their kids how the real world works--you have to go to work when you're sick, so you have to go to school when you're sick because that is how the real world works. Get in there and tough it out.

But most of it--and I am sure this does not apply to anyone's parents here, of course--was that the parent didn't want to be at home with a sick kid, often because the parent wanted that time to do other things. As in, have an affair, drink themselves into oblivion for a while, get high, or just not have to deal with the kid--to the point that a kid who came to school sick on a frequent basis or when several kids from one family came to school sick on a frequent basis, it was considered a red flag that something might be going on at home.

So y'all out there who send your sick kids to school might want to rethink that. The teachers hate you because whatever crud your kid has will infect the other kids and make their lives harder and the school nurse wonders what you are up to.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,820
I used to teach 8-year-olds. They taught me very quickly that most stomach aches announced in a classroom do not exist. (They are a convenient complaint that is not obvious to the human eye or testable via thermometer & therefore a potential opportunity to avoid schoolwork or take a fieldtrip down the hall to the office). Generally speaking, I found that telling students to tell me again if they still did not feel well before going to recess was a pretty sound test. If they went to recess, not sick. If they really felt sick, they didn't want to go to recess & remembered to tell you so then. This system was unecessary for kids who genuinely looked sick or were behaving unlike themselves. (I also always had a free-trip-to-the-bathroom-without-asking-if-you-need-to-throwup policy, which I think one child took me up on).

8-year-olds also taught me that one should only stock plain bandaids. One container of dinosaur bandaids "sells out" with ouchies in a day.

Anyway, my guess is that this year a lot more kids will be sent straight to the office at the first complaint.
 

Japanfan

Well-Known Member
Messages
23,451
Showoff! No seriously, great news. Wish I was there!
We got a bit lucky here in that BC's spring break was two weeks behind Quebec's - presumably students didn't go away due the ***** and bring it back here.

We are also lucky to have Dr. Henry, an exceptional public health officer who has been written up/commended by the New York Times and has become sort of a celebrity - First Nations have given her a First Nations name, something like '
she who is calm in a storm', and her shoes have prompted a trend.

Also, I think we followed social distancing guidelines well. It helps that Vancouver and surrounding areas are not dense, except for the city downtown.

Today I went to Safeway and there weren't many people wearing masks, TBH.

I'll add that Canadians are also lucky to have a national leader who responded promptly and efficiently, though I do acknowledge criticisms of his response and limitations to programs he implemented to address the BB. His response should have been expected, not seen as exceptional. It's a bad day when competence in a democratically elected leader becomes commendable.

However, it needs to be recognized that the situation in nursing homes here is a blight on the response. Rather a disgrace.
 
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missing

Well-Known To Whom She Wonders
Messages
3,514
Why men got the short end of the CV19 stick.

Initial reports from China revealed the early evidence of increased male mortality associated with *********. According to the Global Health 50/50 research initiative, nearly every country is now reporting significantly higher *********-19-related mortality rates in males than in females as of June 4. Yet, current data suggest similar infection rates for men and women. In other words, while men and women are being infected with *********-19 at similar rates, a significantly higher proportion of men succumb to the disease than women, across groups of similar age. Why is it then that more men are dying from *********-19? Or rather, should we be asking why are more women surviving?
 

Prancer

Needs More Sleep
Staff member
Messages
50,336
I used to teach 8-year-olds. They taught me very quickly that most stomach aches announced in a classroom do not exist.
We got a lot of stomaches and headaches in the clinic, too. Most of the kids just wanted or needed a break from class, but again--a kid who was having stomachaches or headaches on a frequent basis was usually a kid who was having some kind of major stress problem, usually at home but sometimes at school.

But oh, yes, to the bandaid thing. All it took was one kid to get a cute one, and here they would all come.
 

skategal

Bunny mama
Messages
6,728
But most of it--and I am sure this does not apply to anyone's parents here, of course--was that the parent didn't want to be at home with a sick kid, often because the parent wanted that time to do other things. As in, have an affair, drink themselves into oblivion for a while, get high, or just not have to deal with the kid--
This is what happens in our school.

It is almost always the ones who don't work outside the home or have very flexible schedules that send the kids to school sick.

Can't miss their workout or their manicure or out for coffee with friends.

Having kids really cramps their style, apparently. :rolleyes:
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
Messages
21,241
I guess the other side of that is the parent who keeps their kid home at the slightest sign of a sniffle or tummy ache so that they can "work" from home* and be with them.

* of course I'm speaking of a time before all this when many parents still went to an office to work.
 

BaileyCatts

Well-Known Member
Messages
8,624
...… Part of it is that some parents think they are teaching their kids how the real world works--you have to go to work when you're sick, so you have to go to school when you're sick because that is how the real world works. Get in there and tough it out.
…….
Yep. That was her. In my first several years when I started working I would go to work sick all the time too because 'that's what you do'. It took a while for me to realize that nope, when you are sick as a dog sick, you call in and take a sick day. Took me a long time to realize its okay to do that.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
Once when my middle son was 4 or 5, he had gotten a scrap from the swimming pool at daycare. It wasnt healing and he complained hurt a lot.

After 4 days I took him to the doctor, the doctor told me to take my mom hat off and look at the rash as a nurse. :duh: yep shingles. I had been sending him to day care with Shingles. 7-14 days later there was an outbreak of chicken pox :(. Pre-vaccine.

Contagious diseases are rampant in day care and schools. I dont see any way that C-19 wont spread like wildfire when school resumes. The same with college, once fall classes resume wildfire.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
Messages
21,241
Yep. That was her. In my first several years when I started working I would go to work sick all the time too because 'that's what you do'. It took a while for me to realize that nope, when you are sick as a dog sick, you call in and take a sick day. Took me a long time to realize its okay to do that.
I'm sure I've mentioned this over the years - but many moons ago I had a job where they awarded a "health bonus" if you took zero sick days. We were mostly entry level making crap money so the prospect of $500 at the end of the year was a big incentive, not to mention squeezing every buck out of the owners that we could. Every year maybe 1/3 of the staff would make it to then end, including memorably a woman who was pregnant most of the year. I got it all three years I was there.

The downside, aside from progressively sicker people coming in as the year went on, was that if you bailed early in the year, after that there was no incentive so you'd take every sick day you could get away with, whether you were sick or not.
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
Messages
63,153
I went to the garden center yesterday, masks and social distancing have been forgotten by most people in the store. I was less concerned about going to run errands when people were staying home than I am now. I won't be going to the grocery store or pretty much anywhere there are a lot of people. The risk is far greater now than it was in March. Albeit, I do have the O blood type which apparently reduces my risk by quite a bit. If I had A or B, I'd be extremely cautious about what you do and where you go. I'll believe we won't have to cancel FTF classes in the fall in December.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
I agree. People think things are open, no more need for masks or handwashing or wiping down surfaces.

When my dil goes back to the office and Aubrey is in daycare starting July, the older grandchildren go back to school, and my other dil starts clinical rotation in August, I suspect I wont see my kids and grandchildren.

Not just because I consider it risky, but my sons are very protective of us and they won't do it.
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
Messages
63,153
I agree. People think things are open, no more need for masks or handwashing or wiping down surfaces.

When my dil goes back to the office and Aubrey is in daycare starting July, the older grandchildren go back to school, and my other dil starts clinical rotation in August, I suspect I wont see my kids and grandchildren.

Not just because I consider it risky, but my sons are very protective of us and they won't do it.
Micah's former caregiver is a home health aide. She's been doing this for a long time and understands how to protect herself, but she's extremely concerned about her 3 year old granddaughter. The child's mother is sending her back to daycare which just reopened. Traci has tried to argue that she should stay with her or her other grandmother, but Mama is adamant she go back. If the kid brings something to Traci, she not only risks her own health, but she won't be able to work as she can't carry something into one of her client's home.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
Micah's former caregiver is a home health aide. She's been doing this for a long time and understands how to protect herself, but she's extremely concerned about her 3 year old granddaughter. The child's mother is sending her back to daycare which just reopened. Traci has tried to argue that she should stay with her or her other grandmother, but Mama is adamant she go back. If the kid brings something to Traci, she not only risks her own health, but she won't be able to work as she can't carry something into one of her client's home.
Aubrey's other grandparents are totally relying on son and dil to do the grocery shopping and other errands because of her immunocompromised brother and her mom's anxiety. DIL has been fighting to continue to work from home because of that. I wouldn't be surprised if she quit work as they have always budgeted to live on one salary. I'm not sure why they haven't asked me, but I think it's that they dont want to risk exposure for us.
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
7,820
The same with college, once fall classes resume wildfire.
I could see things maybe go OK through September. Generally speaking, everyone is rested & comes into schools pretty healthy at the start of the school year. By October, though, teachers are more run down and the germs have been passed around. By the 2nd or 3rd week of October, subs are usually working full time.


Some news/articles I ran across while searching state news yesterday:

Hospitalizations are up in North Carolina & Texas. (Over 30% up in Texas).

GOP expects to move its convention to Jacksonville after dispute with North Carolina over ********* safeguards
https://tinyurl.com/ycj62kqb

Georgia election 'catastrophe' in largely minority areas sparks investigation
https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/2020-election/georgia-secretary-state-launches-investigation-after-unacceptable-voting-problems-n1228541

This would be an exceptionally good time to deal with the above.

NC Gov. Cooper declares Ace Speedway an ‘imminent hazard’ and closes the facility

https://www.newsobserver.com/news/rebuild/article243392236.html

******** Cases Have Risen Over 500% In Alabama’s Capital Since The Start Of May: Report
https://tinyurl.com/y94kamr4
 

SkateSand

Cat Servant
Messages
690
I'm sure I've mentioned this over the years - but many moons ago I had a job where they awarded a "health bonus" if you took zero sick days. We were mostly entry level making crap money so the prospect of $500 at the end of the year was a big incentive, not to mention squeezing every buck out of the owners that we could. Every year maybe 1/3 of the staff would make it to then end, including memorably a woman who was pregnant most of the year. I got it all three years I was there.

The downside, aside from progressively sicker people coming in as the year went on, was that if you bailed early in the year, after that there was no incentive so you'd take every sick day you could get away with, whether you were sick or not.
For a few years, the company I worked for offered an extra vacation day bonus every six months if you didn't take a sick day. They finally abandoned it since they had only one employee who earned all those extra vacation days (me, of the great immune system). But they didn't think things through. At the time, they also had a sick time program of 12 sick days a year in addition to two to four weeks (depending on seniority) of vacation days. Why would people knock themselves out to win that extra day when they could take one day off every month on paid sick time (which some did - there were certain employees that as it got to the end of the month, I knew they would be calling in sick, and I was right every time). Then they changed it to only 3 sick days per year so people who were really sick ended up having to use up a lot of their vacation time, to the point they never got to take off for a real vacation because they had used all of it up for sick time. That's what happened in December and January - people were sick as dogs for weeks and ended up using all accrued vacation time for sick time.
 

Louis

Private citizen
Messages
14,699
I guess the other side of that is the parent who keeps their kid home at the slightest sign of a sniffle or tummy ache so that they can "work" from home* and be with them.

* of course I'm speaking of a time before all this when many parents still went to an office to work.
At last my job, I really didn't know what to do with someone who was taking one "work from home" / sick day* a week to deal with his sick child. This was in addition to 100% pay for 80% work (as was the company policy for those returning to work after parental leave).

I'm sensitive to the situation, but at the same time, collaborative work and meetings were proving impossible when we had no idea if/when this guy was going to be available.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
I read an article today, cant find it now, that listed 7 changes stay at home people intent to change lives. Three of the ones that struck me.

Less consumption/consumerism-people reported they intend to continue this in the long term

Ate more meals at home-people reported they will continue doing more cooking at home

Spending more time in nature. People reported they will continue to be outside in nature.

These struck me as significant in terms of economic recovery.

What changes/habits occurred during stay at home that you will continue?
 

rfisher

Let the skating begin
Messages
63,153
At last my job, I really didn't know what to do with someone who was taking one "work from home" / sick day* a week to deal with his sick child. This was in addition to 100% pay for 80% work (as was the company policy for those returning to work after parental leave).

I'm sensitive to the situation, but at the same time, collaborative work and meetings were proving impossible when we had no idea if/when this guy was going to be available.
Parental leave is such a touchy topic which is why many hospitals have gone to PTO rather than sick leave/vacation/holiday pay. You get X amount of time. Use it as you need it for however you need it. When/if you run out, then you have to apply for LWOP. We've done that with student time off. You miss clinic, you have to make it up. You don't have to give me an excuse. Just call and let us know you won't be there. We do make them call because we've had incidents where a student was actually in trouble and when they didn't call, we were able to track them down and find them help.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
Messages
28,305
Not sure about K-12 schools, but at colleges/universities, semesters are planned several months ahead, because of workloads, classroom allocations, etc. At my university, the fall (Sept-Dec) and winter (Jan-April) semesters are already scheduled. And as we found out this past semester, it's extremely difficult to take face-to-face courses online in the middle of a semester.

So right now, the entire fall semester is online. And if things haven't changed significantly by early fall, I wouldn't be surprised to see the entire winter semester go online too.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
One of my good friends works at a Catholic school system Pre-K thru 12. They've been working on their plan since April. It needs to be turned into the state by July 1. Since Reynolds says business can open to 100% capacity, I'm not sure if it means schools are mandated to do full classrooms.
 

quartz

almost, but not quite
Messages
13,948
My college is planning a mix of online and in-person. We have a great deal of content that involves specialized equipment and machinery - hands-on training that cannot be learned from watching a video. Instructors and students often need to be head-to-head to ensure that the proper technique and manipulation is being performed correctly. They are looking at spacing out the machine shop/weld stations, and having fewer students at a time. This will likely lead to more late night classes, as well as weekends to accommodate.
 

SkateSand

Cat Servant
Messages
690
Our local schools just received their guidelines for reopening (which will take place in the fall) from the state superintendent and they were published by local media. Basically, the guidelines are what would be expected: 6 feet of social distancing at all times in classrooms, recess, and school buses, no contact sports, masks for students and teachers 100% of the time. The parents of the elementary school kids are just coming unglued on social media and maintaining that good luck on 1st graders staying six feet from their friends all day and wearing masks all day. Many insist they will be doing home schooling. Well, we'll see. They didn't cope too well with home schooling while the schools were closed. There are a lot of students who don't have internet access here in this rural area so they were left stranded. My husband is a substitute teacher so I'm not sure if he'll be really busy or not busy at all as we probably won't know until fall how many teachers will be returning.
 

once_upon

Voter
Messages
15,750
My sister posted an article about National Guard troops test positive after being called to control protests in DC. Many of the troops did not wear masks. Number affected was not disclosed
 

manhn

Well-Known Member
Messages
13,097
British Columbia: another day of no new deaths! 12 in hospital, 4 of which are in ISU.

But 12 new cases. And our new cases can be traced to at least 2 large family gatherings. One involved 30 family members, where 15 of them tested positive. What kinda house do you have that can accommodate 30 people and social distancing?!!?
 

Desperado

Well-Known Member
Messages
935
One involved 30 family members, where 15 of them tested positive. What kinda house do you have that can accommodate 30 people and social distancing?!!?
If 15 people were contaminated, the house clearly did not allow for enough social distancing.

What is the group meeting limit in BC? We’re at 10 in Ontario but since, from your multiple posts, BC is doing so much better, is it at 30? [Yep, I’m bitter because you have Bonnie Henry and all we have is Mini-Trump Ford.]
 
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