News and Updates about Russia's War against Ukraine.

allezfred

In A Fake Snowball Fight
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Eh, good? But why only now? What is Japans stance on Russia so far?
@allezfred ? I heard about China and India and so on but I dont really know about Japan?

Japan has been on the right side of things. When I was in Japan recently, there were lots of Ukrainian flags. :)

Plus Japan has its own firsthand experience of Russia annexing Japanese territory.


Mr allezfred's father's family fled the islands in dispute in the closing stages of World War 2. The Soviet army apparently bombed ships carrying civilians. :(
 
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pointbleu

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Eh, good? But why only now? What is Japans stance on Russia so far?
@allezfred ? I heard about China and India and so on but I dont really know about Japan?

« The list of apparent enemies of Russia includes all the 27 EU member countries plus Monaco, Switzerland, Norway, Iceland and San Marino, the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, Switzerland, Japan, South Korea, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, Micronesia. »

 

Vagabond

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A source in the Kremlin claims that 261,000 men left Russia between Wednesday and Saturday night and that some are discussing asking Putin to prohibit men of mobilization age from leaving the country.
 

clairecloutier

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Vagabond

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A source in the Kremlin claims that 261,000 men left Russia between Wednesday and Saturday night and that some are discussing asking Putin to prohibit men of mobilization age from leaving the country.
ETA:

NPR is reporting that Turkish Airlines has stopped service from Russia until the new year.
 

Karen-W

Neither sexy nor sultry, but loving life!
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ETA:

NPR is reporting that Turkish Airlines has stopped service from Russia until the new year.
That's nuts. Istanbul was one of the few major cities left for flights into and out of Russia.
 

taz'smum

'Be Kind' - every skater has their own story
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ETA:

NPR is reporting that Turkish Airlines has stopped service from Russia until the new year.
On their website it says this

Cancelled flights to and from Minsk (Belarus), Krasnodar, Sochi, Rostov & Yekaterinburg (Russia) Learn more

Our flights from/to Minsk (Belarus), Krasnodar have been cancelled until December 31, 2022 (inclusive), from/to Sochi (Russia) have been cancelled until December 31, 2022 (inclusive), from/to Rostov (Russia) have been cancelled until December, 2022 (inclusive) and from/to Yekaterinburg (Russia) have been cancelled until December 31, 2022 (inclusive).

However, I note that there are some flights available from Moscow to Istanbul though lots are sold out.
 
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alexikeguchi

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A source in the Kremlin claims that 261,000 men left Russia between Wednesday and Saturday night and that some are discussing asking Putin to prohibit men of mobilization age from leaving the country.
Well, I guess that's one definition of "partial mobilization"... to the exits.
 

Asli

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12,981
Where flights from Russia went during last Tuesday and Wednesday:

From flightradar24

On Wednesday, the day after Putin's speech, there's an explosion of the number of flights to Turkey. Avoiding Ukrainian air space obviously.
 

Dobre

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"Lithuania to provide nearly 25,000 Ukrainian soldiers with winter uniforms. According to Lithuanian media outlet Delfi, the country's Defense Minister Arvydas Anusauskas said Lithuania will purchase winter uniforms 'worth several million euros' and transfer them to Ukraine."


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"CORRECTION: Our translation of the interview with President Zelenskyy implies that the NASAMS have been delivered. They have not. We apologize for the misinterpretation, according to the DoD, the first NASAMS delivery date is still approx. two months away."
(There's a revised version of the original article attached to the link above).

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"Kommersant reporting Russia detained the general consul of Japan in Vladivostok for 'spying'."

(There's a BBC article on this too, but it's behind a paywall).

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The news from the fighting around Lyman seems to be mostly unconfirmed or reported via Russia at this stage, but here is a thread with various details that were gathered from a variety of sources prior to this morning. About 4 different communities are mentioned within it.


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reut

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2,043
The Yale University Jackson School of Global Affairs hosts the discussion, “The War in Ukraine: Where do we go from here?” with Timothy Snyder and others, live right now:
 

airgelaal

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In russian it would be Elena (or Yelena closer to pronunciation), in Ukrainian it's Olena, sounds as it's written.
Alyona is a different name, exists both in russian and Ukrainian.
Not really. In the 90s, the rules were very strict and it was impossible to write Alyona in the documents. All the girls who were called Alyona in the documents were called Olena. My neighbor was very sorry that she could not write the name Alyona in her daughter's birth certificate. But later it was possible to name the children as the parents wanted. When the daughter of a neighbor received a passport, she could change her name herself, but she did not want to and became Olena in the passport. But I know women who changed. Therefore, if we are talking about women over 30, then the name in the documents may be different.
But Olena Zelenska is Olena in real life.
 

Asli

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12,981
This is gifted:

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive...ytcore-ios-share&referringSource=articleShare

It is just not true that Russians didn’t know what happened in the early war days, listen to these horrific calls from soldiers to their families.

Of course they knew. Thanks for the piece of great reporting from NYT. Even though we know that these atrocities have taken place, it makes them more concrete to hear soldiers talk about them in first person.

In the beginning of the war, some Russians seemed to refuse to believe it though. There was a video where a DW journalist was interviewing a young woman who was sitting on the rubble of her own house and talking to her aunt in Russia on the phone. Apparently the aunt told her that there was no occupation. :(
 

Aussie Willy

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I am listening the Hal Sparks podcast live. He has Phillip Ittner on with him. Retired journalist who has fantastic knowledge about this stuff. Really fantastic conversation.
 

Dobre

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US announces $1.1 billion more in military aid for Ukraine​


List of some of what is included.
(The posters I'm following are very happy about this).
 

text_skate

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Interesting piece in Atlantic by Phillips Payson O’Brien, it's about why the Ukrainians might win

The persistence of the Putin-Cruz-Carlson vision of war is surprising, because we have decades, even centuries, of evidence to the contrary. Since the Industrial Revolution, and in many ways before, the ability to run a complex system has been the cornerstone of strategic success. Though much military popular literature likes to stress the human drama of combat—the bravery and sacrifice, the cowardice and atrocity—it is not nearly as important in victory or defeat as many people assume. In state-to-state wars—a category that includes the current Russian invasion of Ukraine as well as broader conflicts such as the two world wars—the side that can most efficiently deploy more effective equipment operated by better-trained personnel has typically emerged victorious.
 

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