News and Updates about Russia's War against Ukraine.

babayaga

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They have a lot of bots that look for key phrases and just ban the user or hide the post automatically. Sometimes if you appeal, a human looks at it and might reverse the decision. But their moderation is pretty arbitrary in my experience.
Also Ukrainian portion of Facebook was always moderated by their russian wing. I thought after the war started Facebook was planning to create a new moderating office, not russia based, but I don't know if it actually happened.
 

reut

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First few days when Bucha atrocities were being discovered, the hashtag #buchamassacre on Instagram was hidden! Meaning if you searched for it you saw nothing, if you searched for tag #bucha or for Bucha as location you saw just lovely photos of green city with parks and laughing children...
 

airgelaal

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912
First few days when Bucha atrocities were being discovered, the hashtag #buchamassacre on Instagram was hidden! Meaning if you searched for it you saw nothing, if you searched for tag #bucha or for Bucha as location you saw just lovely photos of green city with parks and laughing children...
Yes, and if you write about the war and your own experience it's a hate speech. The more followers you have, the more likely you are to be blocked.
The world should only know about "good Russians"
 

hoptoad

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Sunday update on some of the progress in the last week:


Also, I was able to hear Alexander Vindman speak last week at Connecticut College. He talked for about 20 minutes and then answered questions for a solid hour. Every question was about Ukraine and it was quite interesting - I would have stayed another few hours.
 

DORISPULASKI

Watching submarine races
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13,194
That was reported in my local paper, The Day.


Before reading this article, I had not thought of Putin's need for vengeance against Ukraine in this way:

"The president [Trump at the time] was offering a clear signal that personal interests were to be placed above national security interests,’ he [Vindman] said. “And there was an opportunity to take care of something that Putin has been wanting to solve for a very very long time, which is deal with a Ukraine that was instrumental in the collapse of the Soviet Union.”

He said Ukraine’s vote for independence in 1991 “put the nail in the coffin of the Soviet Union."
 

Dobre

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For what it's worth, there have been lots of viewable posts here about the Izium grave site getting through the censors on Twitter. Sometimes I've had to hit "view" in order to see the pictures. (These seem to turn out to be photos of actual bodies).:cry: Images of the grave, the searchers, and one in which the body had been blurred were not hidden. A lot of these come with written explanations of what the searchers are finding.

Meanwhile, I ran across an article by Dan Rather about Biden helping to end the threat of the train strike for which one had to hit the view button, for no discernible reason. (Too "sensitive" for some people to view apparently:rolleyes:).

My guess is that trolls monitor some topics and "report" anything they don't want other people to see. That, as MacMadame referenced, good things get blocked without real human site monitors ever looking at them. At least the images get hidden temporarily. And temporarily hiding something is all that is necessary to bury a post well down most viewers' feed.
 

hoptoad

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That was reported in my local paper, The Day.


Before reading this article, I had not thought of Putin's need for vengeance against Ukraine in this way:
Building on this, Vindman also made remarks along these lines: Putin wanted to keep Ukraine from moving west not primarily because of a military threat, but because a prosperous Ukraine was an ongoing threat to his rule. One in three Russians have ties to Ukraine, which makes increasing differences in material and socio-political quality of life hard to ignore, setting up a dynamic similar to East vs West Germany for the USSR. It's a severe poke at the Russian ego to see the "little brother" surpassing them in any way.
 

Dobre

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Survivors of Russian occupation: 'You say something wrong – you get a sack on your head'​


This is a story about the survivors.

"For the people of Verbivka, it was a time of fear.

'The worst thing is that you know anything could happen to you,' says Sinovoz.

'They could come to anyone for any reason and do anything to you. And there was absolutely nothing to stop them.'

'I am old; they had no problems with me. But I was really worried about my niece. She’s 17, and she was here in this mess,” Sinovoz said. “We managed to take her away from here secretly.'

'As for us — we were always afraid, trying to stay indoors for as long as possible, not to catch their eyes. A man with a gun is always scary.'

As pretty much anywhere, there were collaborators.

Those mainly were locals seeking power over their fellow townspeople and a chance to put their hands on local businesses and properties or join the embezzlement of Russian funds.

Collaborators reporting on their neighbors was a very normal thing.

They all fled the town in a rush along with the Russian military, loathed and despised by their former fellow townsfolk.

'May god forgive me for this, but if there will be an investigation, I’ll be naming names,' says Sinovoz.

'They helped Russians rob their neighbors, they wanted money and authority over us. Everybody in the town knows who did that, and the whole of Ukraine will know soon.'

Collaborators did a lot of harm, reporting on Ukrainian retired war veterans and their families.

Russians would haunt young, strong males suspected of being prone to armed resistance.

Those detained in improvised Russian jails were beaten and interrogated.

Some were released, but others were not.

Thus, according to the people of Verbivka, a local resident Oleh Skomorokha was detained by Russians in March. To this day, no one knows if the man is still alive.

'They would take people off the streets,' says Volodymyr Vynnyk, an elderly local resident.

'You sneeze the wrong way, or you say something wrong — you get a sack on your head, and they take you to a house they use as a jail. You know what they did to people in those jails.'

'I personally saw Russians take two men with sacks on their heads into the school. We have no idea who those men were and if they ever left the building alive,' he said."
 

Asli

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Dobre

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Ukraine has taken control of Oskil & Yats'kivka and has taken back control of Bilohorivka.


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Updated map of the front lines in Kherson.


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"Ukrainian forces liberated the towns of Oleksandrivka and Krymky Donetsk Oblast."

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Russian Pop Music Icon Comes Out Against the War in Ukraine​


"Russia’s defining 20th-century pop star, Alla Pugacheva, declared her opposition to the invasion of Ukraine on Sunday, emerging as the most significant celebrity to come out against the war as President Vladimir V. Putin faces growing challenges on and off the battlefield.

Ms. Pugacheva, who is 73, wrote in a post on Instagram, where she has 3.4 million followers, that Russians were dying in Ukraine for 'illusory goals.' The war, she wrote, was 'turning our country into a pariah and worsening the lives of our citizens.'"


"'I request to be added to the ranks of foreign agents of my beloved country,” she wrote. “I am in solidarity with my husband, an honest, respectable and genuine person who is a true and incorruptible patriot of Russia, who wishes his Motherland prosperity, peaceful life, freedom of speech and the end of the death of our guys for illusory goals that are turning our country into a pariah and worsening the lives of our citizens.'"


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"Wagner's telegram channel had to disable its users' comments, because "through some miraculous way our adversary has replaced our like emoji" (to the Azov logo)
:)
 

Sylvia

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President Vladimir Putin on Wednesday ordered Russia's first mobilisation since World War Two, warning that Moscow would respond with the might of all its vast arsenal if the West continued with what he called its "nuclear blackmail."
The blunt warning from Russia's paramount leader, whose country has more nuclear warheads than even the United States, marks the biggest escalation of the war in Ukraine since Moscow's Feb. 24 invasion.
"If the territorial integrity of our country is threatened, we use all available means to protect our people - this is not a bluff," Putin said in a televised address to the nation.
Putin said he had signed a decree on a partial mobilisation. The mobilisation, which affects anyone who has served as a professional soldier in Russia rather than a conscript, begins immediately.
Sergei Shoigu, Russia's defence minister, said separately he expected 300,000 people to be called up.
BBC’s Steve Rosenberg tweeted this: https://twitter.com/bbcstever/status/1572483038277165056
Until today the Kremlin has been claiming that its ‘special military operation’ in Ukraine has been going according to plan. Vladimir Putin's "partial mobilisation" dispels that one.
ETA: https://twitter.com/telegraph/status/1572479373487251456
Russia's Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu has given the first official Russian casualty figure since March.
He says 5,937 Russian soldiers have died in Ukraine, up from 1,351
(Western intelligence agencies say they believe the true number of Russian soldiers killed in action is far higher.)
 
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Asli

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Already people were trying to get their sons out of Russia for fear of mobilisation, but after Putin's address yesterday, it's the exodus.

Flights out of Russia sell out after Putin orders partial call-up

"Defence Minister Sergei Shoigu said the call-up would be limited to those with experience as professional soldiers, and that students and those who had only served as conscripts would not be called up."

Strangely enough, people don't seem to trust him. Maybe they're doing the maths, what with the "three-day operation" becoming a 200+ day war. :scream:
 

Louis

Private citizen
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So how concerned should one be over close Putin allies threatening to nuke the U.K.? :shuffle:

Asli just pointed what I was going to post: sales of one-way tickets out of Russia have skyrocketed. This feels like a significant escalation. I truly feel for all those opposed to this terrible war, and I hope the world can find a way to accommodate those who are truly opposed while minimizing intake of cowardly sympathizers.
 

Asli

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So how concerned should one be over close Putin allies threatening to nuke the U.K.? :shuffle:

Asli just pointed what I was going to post: sales of one-way tickets out of Russia have skyrocketed. This feels like a significant escalation. I truly feel for all those opposed to this terrible war, and I hope the world can find a way to accommodate those who are truly opposed while minimizing intake of cowardly sympathizers.
It may be an escalation to Russian citizens, but what if Russia simply ran out of troops? Russia had started the campaign with only 150.000 troops. The number of families having received compensation for their KIA sons is nearly 50.000, according to Russian sources. This doesn't include mercenaries, unconfirmed cases, POW and the wounded.

So who is fighting?

Recruiting 300.000 reservists. :( That will hurt obviously.
 
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Asli

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So how concerned should one be over close Putin allies threatening to nuke the U.K.? :shuffle:

Asli just pointed what I was going to post: sales of one-way tickets out of Russia have skyrocketed. This feels like a significant escalation.

IMHO the worst escalation is by Russia deciding to annex Donbass through the referendums in Donetsk and Lugansk. When this happens, as far as Russia is concerned the war will be taking place in Russian territory. Could this affect the help the Ukrainian army gets from Europe and the USA? Upto now they have been adamant that their weapons shouldn't be used on Russian soil.

Of course "Russian territory" is within the scope of the nuclear deterrent. :scream:
 

skatingguy

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IMHO the worst escalation is by Russia deciding to annex Donbass through the referendums in Donetsk and Lugansk. When this happens, as far as Russia is concerned the war will be taking place in Russian territory. Could this affect the help the Ukrainian army gets from Europe and the USA? Upto now they have been adamant that their weapons shouldn't be used on Russian soil.

Of course "Russian territory" is within the scope of the nuclear deterrent. :scream:
The rest of the world has largely not accepted the Russian annexation of Crimea, and still consider that territory to be part of Ukraine so I wouldn't worry about the new annexations being a deterrent to aid from NATO or other European countries.
 

Karen-W

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IMHO the worst escalation is by Russia deciding to annex Donbass through the referendums in Donetsk and Lugansk. When this happens, as far as Russia is concerned the war will be taking place in Russian territory. Could this affect the help the Ukrainian army gets from Europe and the USA? Upto now they have been adamant that their weapons shouldn't be used on Russian soil.

Of course "Russian territory" is within the scope of the nuclear deterrent. :scream:
No, that won't change the assistance that is being provided by the EU/NATO. The Donbass is viewed as Ukrainian territory and no amount of referenda organized by the Russian government in those areas will be viewed as legitimate by the West.
 

Asli

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These threats are straight out of the bully playbook - “Let us win the war or we will nuke you” :p
The threat of nukes hasn't been working, especially since everyone knows how much Putin values his own life. ;)

OTOH the EU and the US have been adamant that weapons supplied by them shouldn't be used on "Russian territory". So it would be better if there weren't any grey areas.
 

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