Insurrectionists and subversives: Trump and his supporters (Thread for all things Trump)

DORISPULASKI

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Meanwhile, a group of California Three Percenters with connections to Roger Stone, including a retired Orange County police captain, got arrested for 1/6.


Meanwhile, VA schoolbooks with happy slaves circa 50's to 70's:

Scholastic Press was still removing this stuff from its catalog in 2016:

The schoolbooks I had simply said the Civil War was fought over slavery, and described the three cornered trade. That was it.

Meanwhile, Texas schoolbooks were still downplaying slavery and Jim Crow in this century:
 
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BlueRidge

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No, its not worse. Most modern textbooks I've seen are better about including minority groups & women throughout their books.

I edited my post above to help explain the new problem, which is that we are teaching less history overall in schools now. When we should be teaching more.
Now that there is 50 more years of history, how on earth do they even handle that? In junior high and high back then, we never got up to the previous 50 years. How much detail can be taught?
 

Vagabond

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I don't know any school history books that do either of these things.
According to the book, enslaved people “were allowed all the freedom they seemed to want, and were given the privilege of visiting other plantations when they chose to do so. All that was required of them was to be in place when work time came. At the holiday season they were almost as free as their masters.”
I have a good friend who spent her junior high school and high school years in Texas. She was never taught that Texas was part of the Confederacy. To this day, she believes that Texas, which was admitted to the Union in 1845, sixteen years before it joined the Confederacy, was somehow "neutral" in the Civil War. I can't see how she could believe this if she weren't taught it in school.
 

rfisher

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But can you attest that they totally ignore slavery or that they depict it as a positive experience? I don't think so.

I still think what really needs to happen is that we need to start mandating 2 years of U.S. history in high school. More needs to be taught. History only gets longer & currently, our kids are barely getting past Reconstruction by the time we get to May. They aren't getting an in-depth study of the past century & a half--much of which deals with some pretty heavy duty stuff. If it wasn't for Anne Frank, most kids probably wouldn't even cover World War II. If it wasn't for Martin Luther King Day, they might never get to the Civil Rights movement. History & language arts teachers try to tackle some of the major events of the 20th century, but this is very piecemeal. I've done units on Japanese internment camps. I had one in the 8th grade on Vietnam. A friend read All Quiet on the Western Front as part of her high school curriculum. But the reality is that few kids would get all three of those things in their studies because no one has time!

In fact, there is far less social studies being taught at the lower levels now because it is not tested & administrators are mandating more & more time for math & reading because $$$ is attached to passing those tests.
They consider it from an economic or political perspective and view it collectively. There is a debate among historic archaeologists who focus on slave archaeology that most has been done by white archaeologists. Which is itself a problem. The data and debate are published, but none of it makes its way into high school textbooks which have to be approved by white school boards. There is a huge difference between the current data taken from slave quarters, skeletal analysis, and other data and what's taught. Even the biological data that race is a purely social construct isn't taught until you reach college.
 
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MacMadame

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I don't know any school history books that do either of these things. They could clearly do a better job integrating the discussion of slavery with the coverage of more history.
I think this depends very much on where you went to school. In the North, we were definitely taught that slavery was the cause of the Civil War but it was presented very much as something those evil Southerners did and that it was all over now. How slaves were treated was glossed over and, again, blamed on The South.

But in the South, they don't teach about the Civil War like that at all, obviously. They definitely teach that slaves were happy and that the Civil War didn't make life better for them and perhaps made it worse. After all, they still refer to the Civil War as "The War of Northern Aggression" in many parts of the South.

I would imagine that the Western States, many not being in the Union at the time of the war, teach the subject more dispassionately, and having just reviewed the Social Studies curriculum for K-5 grades for our district, it doesn't treat the problems of slavery as over once the war ended, so that's good.
 

Vagabond

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I would imagine that the Western States, many not being in the Union at the time of the war, teach the subject more dispassionately, and having just reviewed the Social Studies curriculum for K-5 grades for our district, it doesn't treat the problems of slavery as over once the war ended, so that's good.
I grew up in California. We learned about slavery, abolitionism, Reconstruction, disenfranchisement, Jim Crow, and the Civil Rights Movement. In fifth grade, we also studied pre-colonial African history, particulary about the Kingdoms of Mali, Ghana, and Songhai. But that last bit was probably peculiar to my school district. I doubt that students in places like Ukiah and Rancho Palos Verdes studied anything of the sort.
 

overedge

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Cachoo

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My fourth grade class did the Brown Eyes/Blue Eyes experiment and focused on "To Be A Slave" which was on our Newberry list. We eventually (high school) learned about "bleeding Kansas," John Brown, Quantrill's Raiders, slavery as the root cause of the Civil War, Jim Crow and the Civil Rights Movement. However with the exception of that marvelous fourth grade teacher I don't think we talked about how we, as white, Catholic school kids saw people of color. History was in the past and racism was this distant term that truly didn't touch us. I think now we are finally starting to talk about racism in a more frank and painful way. It always needed to be up close and personal.
 

ErikWilliam

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Oregon House expels state Rep. Mike Nearman, plotter of state Capitol incursion​


Thank goodness Republicans in Oregon have common sense. This man was pathetic. Watch the videos in the article.
 
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Dobre

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6 Men Said to Be Tied to Three Percenters Movement Are Charged in Capitol Riot​



Oregon House expels state Rep. Mike Nearman, plotter of state Capitol incursion​

Good. The vote was 59-1.
(Only Nearman voted for himself).

Nails+coffin.
 

canbelto

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Great article about what Trump does nowadays:


When Trump ventured south, a stream of family members (literal and figurative) followed. Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner bought a $32 million waterfront lot in Miami from the Latin crooner Julio Iglesias and enrolled their kids at a nearby Jewish day school. Donald Trump Jr. and his girlfriend, Kimberly Guilfoyle, bought a $9.7 million mansion in Jupiter, Fla. In December, Sean Hannity sold his penthouse not far from former House speaker—and Trump critic—John Boehner’s place along the Gulf of Mexico and bought a $5.3 million seaside home two miles from Mar-a-Lago, symbolically swapping the Boehner Coast for the Trump Coast. Hannity’s Fox News colleague Neil Cavuto joined him, buying a $7.5 million place nearby. “Think about how utterly bizarre that is,” says Eddie Vale, a Democratic strategist. “It’s like if Rachel Maddow and the Pod Save America guys all bought condos in Chicago because they wanted to be close to Barack Obama.”
 

Yazmeen

Shake it then, shake it now, shake it forever
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Oregon House expels state Rep. Mike Nearman, plotter of state Capitol incursion​


Thank goodness Republicans in Oregon have common sense. This man was pathetic. Watch the videos in the article.
However, per another article: "The GOP's reason for expelling him is that he lied to them about how much evidence there was."

That way they can try to save their asses with the MAGAts by not tying the actual expulsion to him aiding an attempted armed incursion. After all, we can't upset the insurrectionists...uh, "tourists."

 

Dobre

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However, per another article: "The GOP's reason for expelling him is that he lied to them about how much evidence there was."
Per the article I read, that was the reasoning of Bill Post. (AKA, he-was-fine-with-everything-Nearman-did-as-long-as-there-wasn't-evidence-of-it:rolleyes:). That said, the quotes from others imply other reasoning.


"Individual Republicans have added to those comments in recent days. On Wednesday, state Rep. Bill Post, R-Keizer, penned an account of why he was urging Nearman to resign. Post concluded that Nearman had lied to him and other Republicans about what evidence existed about his intent on Dec. 21.

About five weeks ago, as one of the closest colleagues he has in the Capitol, I asked ‘is there ANY further video or other evidence?’” Post wrote on his personal website. “He said ‘no.’ That is the crux of the problem: he lied. To me personally and to the Republican caucus.”

House Republican Leader Christine Drazan told OPB on Thursday, she had not believed Nearman intended to allow people into the Capitol until footage emerged June 4. She said she believes people might have been killed without the quick intervention of police.

And Rep. Daniel Bonham, R-The Dalles, said he’d concluded Nearman must be expelled, even though he believes Nearman is a smart lawmaker whose intentions were merely to open up the governing process to the public.

“I believe that’s what he wanted to do,” Bonham said, adding: “There was a great error in judgment that day... I saw the people outside. Nobody should opened a door to the people who were here that day.”
 

canbelto

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Learning more about the pressure Trump applied to the DOJ to "investigate" the election:

 

Aussie Willy

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Learning more about the pressure Trump applied to the DOJ to "investigate" the election:

Well quite a few pages of emails there to read if anyone has the time or inclination to do it. :)
 

BlueRidge

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The Post editorializes about Trump and newly revealed emails.

I'm just weary. Trump's behavior was easily predicted and was predicted by many. That he would not be able to accept defeat was a known factor of his psychological makeup.

It is just sad at this point how the Republican Party has enabled his pathology and incorporated it into the party's substance.

We cannot function as a democracy if a sitting president will not accept defeat in an election. That a political party instead of rejecting his refusal to accept the election results has embraced his pathological distortions is an existential threat to our electoral system.
 

Aussie Willy

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The Post editorializes about Trump and newly revealed emails.

I'm just weary. Trump's behavior was easily predicted and was predicted by many. That he would not be able to accept defeat was a known factor of his psychological makeup.

It is just sad at this point how the Republican Party has enabled his pathology and incorporated it into the party's substance.

We cannot function as a democracy if a sitting president will not accept defeat in an election. That a political party instead of rejecting his refusal to accept the election results has embraced his pathological distortions is an existential threat to our electoral system.
You absolutely hit the nail on the head.

Of course the base guide how the GOP still let Trump run the show. But he must also have a stack of dirt on a number of people within the GOP that one moment they are condemning him and the next sucking up to him like his sh*t don't stink and pretending the insurrection never happened.
 

caseyedwards

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16,417

The Post editorializes about Trump and newly revealed emails.

I'm just weary. Trump's behavior was easily predicted and was predicted by many. That he would not be able to accept defeat was a known factor of his psychological makeup.

It is just sad at this point how the Republican Party has enabled his pathology and incorporated it into the party's substance.

We cannot function as a democracy if a sitting president will not accept defeat in an election. That a political party instead of rejecting his refusal to accept the election results has embraced his pathological distortions is an existential threat to our electoral system.
Romney
Murkowski
Kasich
Hogan
Baker
Kinzinger
Cheney
Jeb bush
George W Bush
Cindy McCain
Many many many many more
The whole- the entire -elite of the Republican Party opposes Trump

It was very very bad strategy Romney Kasich etc had in allowing trump to win the Republican nomination in 2020 unanimously.

They believed correctly that he would lose but wrongly believed there would be extreme total hatred or trump from all republicans after he lost. I mean that was really stupid! I mean republicans got to be so in love in Romney they still made him a senator after he lost

Republicans loved dole so much even after he lost they made his wife a senator

And on and on
 
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