Insurrectionists and subversives: Trump and his supporters (Thread for all things Trump)

Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
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24,532
There's a bipartisan bill that moved through the Senate today against anti-Asian hate crimes.

Of course 6 senators voted against it:

Cotton (R-AR) Cruz (R-TX) Hawley (R-MO) Marshall (R-KS) Paul (R-KY) Tuberville (R-AL)
WTF is wrong with these people? Surely with their current complaints of reverse persecution they should understand what it is to feel under attack. But it only when it suits them. Biggest bunch of hypocrites on this planet.
 

Susan1

Well-Known Member
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9,959

"Stallone^ while denying the reports^ wrote on Instagram that he means "no disrespect to anyone," adding — in a phase that could probably use a comma — "so keep punching folks." "

Or a sentence with a couple ^commas^ and a word that could use an "r"? :rolleyes:
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,938

The government finally connects the line from Trump’s campaign to Russian intelligence​


On Thursday, the Treasury Department unveiled new sanctions against the Russian government linked to its apparent hack of U.S. government networks. But the news release also included a statement clearly answering our second question above.

'During the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign, Kilimnik provided the Russian Intelligence Services with sensitive information on polling and campaign strategy. Additionally, Kilimnik sought to promote the narrative that Ukraine, not Russia, had interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election,' the statement read.

'Kilimnik has also sought to assist designated former President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych. At Yanukovych’s direction, Kilimnik sought to institute a plan that would return Yanukovych to power in Ukraine,' it read.

Yanukovych was a member of the pro-Russian party for which Manafort had worked, the Party of Regions.

That one sentence, though, appears to finally complete the long-speculated line from Trump’s campaign to Russian intelligence. It goes like this, according to the aggregated information compiled by various parts of the government:

  • Trump hires
  • Manafort to run his campaign. Manafort then orders
  • Gates, his deputy, to provide polling and strategy information to
  • Kilimnik, their longtime colleague and, according to the Senate committee, a Russian intelligence officer. Kilimnik then shares that information with
  • Russian intelligence agents.
It’s important to note that there is 1) no evidence at this point that Trump knew about the sharing of that information or 2) that Russia did much with the information it obtained. There were targeted ads from Russian actors during the campaign, but there remains no good evidence that those ads were targeted with insider information (much less well-targeted in general) nor that they had much of an effect.

What is instead revealed is that the government’s concern about the Trump campaign’s links to Russia — links that extended to other members of Trump’s team — was in this case probably warranted. Manafort’s presence in the campaign prompted head-scratching from the outset, given his ties to various international ne’er-do-wells. He had been on the radar of federal intelligence agencies for years. It’s not surprising, then, that this link should be demonstrated. It just took awhile for the line to be drawn as clearly as it was Thursday morning."
 

DORISPULASKI

Watching submarine races
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12,470
It is not like Kilimnik's Russian intelligence connection was unknown. His name first came up when Manafort was fired from the Trump campaign. It appeared Kilimnik's coworkers referred to him as "Kostya from the KGB." (I remember this being reported by Rachel Maddow back in the summer of 2020.)
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,938

After the Riot​

It’s been 100 days since the attack on the Capitol, and those who were inside still struggle with their memories.


A nice article with brief takeaways from people who worked at the Capitol in different walks of life & were there that day.
 

overedge

G.O.A.T.
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29,957
This is...what's the word?

An America First Caucus is recruiting lawmakers calling for "common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and a return to architectural style that “befits the progeny of European architecture.”

"Uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions"? Are they going to dress up like Vikings and sail across the Atlantic to invade the UK?
 

Dobre

Well-Known Member
Messages
9,938
Federal prosecutors secure first guilty plea in cases stemming from Jan. 6 Capitol riot
Jon Schaffer, a member of the Oath Keepers, is expected to plead guilty to unlawfully entering Congress and obstructing an official proceeding.

This is...what's the word?

An America First Caucus is recruiting lawmakers calling for "common respect for uniquely Anglo-Saxon political traditions” and a return to architectural style that “befits the progeny of European architecture.”
UnAmerican.
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
40,988
From Ruben Gallego:
So what kind of food will they eat in this Caucus meeting? Just purely Anglo Saxon food? What does that even look like ? Can you use spices? What about tomatoes and potatoes those were cultivated by Indigenous people of the New World?
They will eat stuffed hot dogs. (Which I tend to refer to as "White People Food" when I'm eating them. :lol:
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
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16,244
Looks like the Pompeos used State Department staff as their own personal staff. https://www.politico.com/news/2021/...of-state-department-resources-ig-finds-482500

Susan Pompeo, for instance, asked staff members to buy a T-shirt for a friend; arrange for flowers to be sent to friends recovering from sickness; and help her book hair salon appointments when she was in New York during the U.N. General Assembly and would meet with foreign dignitaries. One year, a senior adviser to the secretary and a senior Foreign Service officer came in on a weekend “to envelope, address, and mail personal Christmas cards for the Pompeos,” the report states.

...

The apparently personal Pompeo tasks required time either when they were on-duty or off-duty, the report states. The Pompeos did not separately compensate the staffers for the non-State Department-related work, the report states.
 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,313
It is not like Kilimnik's Russian intelligence connection was unknown. His name first came up when Manafort was fired from the Trump campaign. It appeared Kilimnik's coworkers referred to him as "Kostya from the KGB." (I remember this being reported by Rachel Maddow back in the summer of 2020.)
Everyone in American Government knew he was russian intelligence and he got visas to enter America all the time. It was not an issue

The government finally connects the line from Trump’s campaign to Russian intelligence​


On Thursday, the Treasury Department unveiled new sanctions against the Russian government linked to its apparent hack of U.S. government networks. But the news release also included a statement clearly answering our second question above.

'During the 2016 U.S. presidential election campaign, Kilimnik provided the Russian Intelligence Services with sensitive information on polling and campaign strategy. Additionally, Kilimnik sought to promote the narrative that Ukraine, not Russia, had interfered in the 2016 U.S. presidential election,' the statement read.

'Kilimnik has also sought to assist designated former President of Ukraine Viktor Yanukovych. At Yanukovych’s direction, Kilimnik sought to institute a plan that would return Yanukovych to power in Ukraine,' it read.

Yanukovych was a member of the pro-Russian party for which Manafort had worked, the Party of Regions.

That one sentence, though, appears to finally complete the long-speculated line from Trump’s campaign to Russian intelligence. It goes like this, according to the aggregated information compiled by various parts of the government:

  • Trump hires
  • Manafort to run his campaign. Manafort then orders
  • Gates, his deputy, to provide polling and strategy information to
  • Kilimnik, their longtime colleague and, according to the Senate committee, a Russian intelligence officer. Kilimnik then shares that information with
  • Russian intelligence agents.
It’s important to note that there is 1) no evidence at this point that Trump knew about the sharing of that information or 2) that Russia did much with the information it obtained. There were targeted ads from Russian actors during the campaign, but there remains no good evidence that those ads were targeted with insider information (much less well-targeted in general) nor that they had much of an effect.

What is instead revealed is that the government’s concern about the Trump campaign’s links to Russia — links that extended to other members of Trump’s team — was in this case probably warranted. Manafort’s presence in the campaign prompted head-scratching from the outset, given his ties to various international ne’er-do-wells. He had been on the radar of federal intelligence agencies for years. It’s not surprising, then, that this link should be demonstrated. It just took awhile for the line to be drawn as clearly as it was Thursday morning."
Doesn’t the fact that Trump was running the worst presidential campaign ever mean anything! He had the worst pollsters. The worst campaign managers. The worse strategists. I mean Brad parscale was a main figure. You would have to think only information from good pollsters would mean anything.
 

once_upon

Well-Known Member
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18,451

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
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18,821
For all this talk about an Anglo-Saxon political tradition, the English political system was heavily indebted to institutions brought to the country by its early Norman and Angevin ruling class. :p
 

ballettmaus

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,244
I came across a tweet pointing out that it's been 100 days since Trump has been without Twitter and I realized that I don't want to imagine what the last months would have been like if he still were on Twitter. Between Fox News and some members of Congress, it's still bad but with him still on Twitter, it would be so much worse!
 

MacMadame

Staying at home
Messages
40,988
I came across a tweet pointing out that it's been 100 days since Trump has been without Twitter and I realized that I don't want to imagine what the last months would have been like if he still were on Twitter. Between Fox News and some members of Congress, it's still bad but with him still on Twitter, it would be so much worse!
On a related note:

 

caseyedwards

Well-Known Member
Messages
16,313
We banned a guys main method of communicating! Where’d he go?!? What a dumb question! I mean it’s so dumb? Did they expect interviews on CNN? Columns in NYT and WAPO? Remember when the NYT published Tom Cotton? He has been banned from all media except Fox. Starting his own platform? That would fail if even allowed by Amazon, apple.

I know what was supposed to happen! Rubio or Scott were supposed to resign so he could be appointed senator from florida? I guess? Then he’d be voted minority leader!
 
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Aussie Willy

Hates both vegemite and peanut butter
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24,532
On a related note:

Thanks for posting. The Atlantic does very good articles.

At work one of our training courses have incorporated a concept into a course about Above the Line and Below the Line thinking (the course is about safety culture and attitudes). I think it encapsulates Trump beautifully and explains what is most detestable about him. Of course the stuff he did while President was awful, it is this thinking behind him that was the biggest problem. And why those who think the same were drawn towards him. And is probably what is the heart at many of the problems in the US generally.

 

Vagabond

Well-Known Member
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18,821
MTG is such a winner:

Greene has already thrown in the towel.


But not until Matt Gaetz tweeted his support. :rolleyes:
 

BlueRidge

AYS's snark-sponge
Messages
58,352
Greene is an attention whore. Let's see whether Waters claps back or ignores her. Either way, she'll have the last laugh.

People need to remember the lesson we supposedly learned with Donald Trump. People with nothing good to contribute thrive on getting attention by outraging people.

Don't give it to them.

Marjorie Taylor Greene is worth no one's time.
 

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