How to disinfect a new home and a hotel room

Vash01

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There are two parts to this post. How to protect yourself from YKW 1) after Moving into a new home and 2) while staying in a hotel.

I found a link that gives instructions from EPA but it doesn’t answer all Of my questions. https://www.cdc.gov/********/2019-n...1QVpkBG3Vu8KsXj3p9fFCSQTQTJERm2alBX0cX9yVS1-E


May be someone here has experience moving in the last 4-6 months? Also experience with hotel stay?

I never used to think of such things Before YKW.

I will be moving into my new home soon. I have scheduled movers. I was assured That they will wear masks, but I will need to ask about shie covers. I know they don’t wear gloves. I have hired a company with the best feedback and recommendations from friends.

I plan to wipe down all surfaces with Clorox wipes and mop the floor with Pinesol. My concern is about the carpet. I have not found a way to disinfect that. I know that the movers will have shoes on. Unless they use Shoe Covers the carpet will be contaminated, The EPA site uses words Like bleach and warm water on soft surfaces but that would be impossible on a carpet in a bedroom.

I will have to stay in a hotel when I travel, which I have not done in six months.

Because of the current situation I am always concerned about staying in hotels. Some hotels specifically say that they disinfect. I would feel safer there. Some don’t provide bed sheets. I am going to carry bed sheets with me.

I could wipe down the surfaces but it is hard to tell about the air. What if someone who was Asymptomatic with YKW and stayed in that room before me, is there a way to protect myself? I have read about having good ventilatio. May be carry a small fan?
 

Japanfan

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Because of the current situation I am always concerned about staying in hotels. Some hotels specifically say that they disinfect. I would feel safer there. Some don’t provide bed sheets. I am going to carry bed sheets with me.

We rented a cabin for a few days last month, and were required to bring our own bedding. And had to sign several forms pertinent to *******.

I could wipe down the surfaces but it is hard to tell about the air. What if someone who was Asymptomatic with YKW and stayed in that room before me, is there a way to protect myself? I have read about having good ventilatio. May be carry a small fan?

Don't know the answer to that question. But can you get it from someone asymptomatic who was in a place before you were in that place? SFAIK, no.
 
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ballettmaus

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15,341
I could wipe down the surfaces but it is hard to tell about the air. What if someone who was Asymptomatic with YKW and stayed in that room before me, is there a way to protect myself? I have read about having good ventilatio. May be carry a small fan?

Ventilation is about the exchange of air, so a fan wouldn't do much. Try to find a hotel room that has windows that open. What I would then do is enter the room with a mask, open the windows and head outside for maybe half an hour or so.

I'd do the same about the new home, by the way. Open the windows once the movers are gone and get fresh air in for half an hour or longer if possible.

As far as carpets are concerned - do you have the possibility to put old rugs/sheets/plastic over the carpet?
 

million$momma

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I would be more concerned about previous tenants than the movers. We are advised to let houses stand empty for 2 weeks before moving in.
 

Jenny

From the Bloc
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21,313
If the hotel is part of one of the larger chains, they likely have a strong protocol in place to disinfect rooms, and many are keeping rooms empty for three days between bookings to be sure. The hotel industry has been very hard hit by this, and as early as April were putting in place new practices and procedures. Check the company's website as they likely have a full description of measures they are taking, and if not, phone them and ask. If you don't think it's enough, stay somewhere else.

I'd also caution on carpet cleaning because if it's done with heavy chemicals there might be a risk in them gassing off, or contact such as bare feet on a bedroom floor, and certainly if you have children or pets playing on the floor.

Good luck :)
 

Erin

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9,900
I know that the movers will have shoes on. Unless they use Shoe Covers the carpet will be contaminated, The EPA site uses words Like bleach and warm water on soft surfaces but that would be impossible on a carpet in a bedroom.

Every time I have ever moved, the movers have put down things to cover the floor where they are walking so that they don’t get the floor dirty.
 

Vash01

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Ventilation is about the exchange of air, so a fan wouldn't do much. Try to find a hotel room that has windows that open. What I would then do is enter the room with a mask, open the windows and head outside for maybe half an hour or so.

I'd do the same about the new home, by the way. Open the windows once the movers are gone and get fresh air in for half an hour or longer if possible.

As far as carpets are concerned - do you have the possibility to put old rugs/sheets/plastic over the carpet?

I have lots of plastic tablecloths from the Dollar store. I use them to Cover the carpet in my painting room. Could use some of them in the other rooms, particularly the MBR.

It will be easy to open the windows In my house but in a hotel it is nearly impossible. I will be outside in fresh air most of my time away, so that will help. Within the town it may be hard but I could go to a park. I am also reading about the hotels to see which ones are doing extra to disinfect.
 

Vash01

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I would be more concerned about previous tenants than the movers. We are advised to let houses stand empty for 2 weeks before moving in.

My house is brand new, so no previous residents.
 
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OlieRow

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My house is brand new, so no previous residents.

In that case, I'd make sure they wear their masks correctly while they're working and then wipe down what you can after they leave. Booties are fine but I wouldn't have them wear gloves for something like unloading a moving van. If they're touching all kinds of things while working the gloves don't really offer any protection.

For the hotel, my parents have been going back and forth from NJ to NC finishing up a move and have felt safe staying in chain hotels that post their cleaning protocols. Again, I'd wipe down commonly touched surfaces in the room.
 

Vash01

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In that case, I'd make sure they wear their masks correctly while they're working and then wipe down what you can after they leave. Booties are fine but I wouldn't have them wear gloves for something like unloading a moving van. If they're touching all kinds of things while working the gloves don't really offer any protection.

For the hotel, my parents have been going back and forth from NJ to NC finishing up a move and have felt safe staying in chain hotels that post their cleaning protocols. Again, I'd wipe down commonly touched surfaces in the room.

They do wear masks and keep the distance from me. I have not asked them about the booties.
I will still need to wipe down all surfaces after they Leave.

glad to hear your parents didn’t have any problems with the hotels. I have seen some hotels show detailed rules and what they do to protect.
 

million$momma

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As far as a hotel, we were traveling in March when the sh** hit the fan. I Lysol wiped surfaces in the hotel we stayed in on the way home and did not use the comforter. We also did not put anything except for our shoes on the carpet.

Open the windows if possible. We were
I have lots of plastic tablecloths from the Dollar store. I use them to Cover the carpet in my painting room. Could use some of them in the other rooms, particularly the MBR.

It will be easy to open the windows In my house but in a hotel it is nearly impossible. I will be outside in fresh air most of my time away, so that will help. Within the town it may be hard but I could go to a park. I am also reading about the hotels to see which ones are doing extra to disinfect.
Ask for no house keeping service if you are multiple days in the same location.
 

concorde

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I have spent the last 25 years registering pesticide products with the USEPA. For 15 of those years, I specialized in "antimicrobial" product. My clients have included about all of the major companies and many of the mom and pops that have EPA registered disinfectant products.

EPA has published a list of disinfectant products that make ********* claims. The list can be found here (it is regularly updated).
According to EPA's website, the list includes a search tool and you could search for carpets. Unfortunately the search tool does not appear to be working. Even if were working, not sure if you would get any hits since EPA registered carpet "sanitizers" not "disinfectants."

EPA's website does not include a corresponding of sanitizer products with ********* claims. I just googled "carpet sanitizer" products and it shows a Woolite product; however, the products appears to only be a spot treatment (not whole carpet) and ********* does not appear to be listed.

For products with public health claims (kills germs), data must be submitted to EPA that demonstrates the product is efficacious against specific organisms at the contact time listed on the label. That is why the product label may list different kill/contact time for different viruses/bacteria. To get a ********* claim on a label, a product has to meet certain criteria (control of various types of organisms) and only then will EPA allow the claim to be added to the product label.

Not EPA approved disinfectants are the same. Some are "disinfectant only" and others are both a "cleaner and disinfectant." The directions for use should specify which type of product you have and hence, whether pre-cleaning with a different product is required.

For a product to be efficacious, you MUST follow the directions for use especially contact time which means the surface must remain "wet" before wiping off excess material. In drier climates, a second application maybe required to ensure that the surface remains wet long enough to meet the required contact time.

Liquid vs. Wipes. In many cases, the liquid material is added to a physical wipe and voila - your wipe product. So does that mean that the efficacy on both products is the same? Probably not since the "wipe" requires a physical action which physically removes some material in addition to the disinfectant action.

Sorry to be so lengthy.

Personally I would focus on disinfecting the high touch areas (door knobs and stair rails) and the kitchen. I would require the movers to wear booties while in the house. Weather permitting, I would also have the windows open on move day.

Good luck!
 

Vash01

Fan of Yuzuru, Three A's, T&M, P&C
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49,874
I have spent the last 25 years registering pesticide products with the USEPA. For 15 of those years, I specialized in "antimicrobial" product. My clients have included about all of the major companies and many of the mom and pops that have EPA registered disinfectant products.

EPA has published a list of disinfectant products that make ********* claims. The list can be found here (it is regularly updated).
According to EPA's website, the list includes a search tool and you could search for carpets. Unfortunately the search tool does not appear to be working. Even if were working, not sure if you would get any hits since EPA registered carpet "sanitizers" not "disinfectants."

EPA's website does not include a corresponding of sanitizer products with ********* claims. I just googled "carpet sanitizer" products and it shows a Woolite product; however, the products appears to only be a spot treatment (not whole carpet) and ********* does not appear to be listed.

For products with public health claims (kills germs), data must be submitted to EPA that demonstrates the product is efficacious against specific organisms at the contact time listed on the label. That is why the product label may list different kill/contact time for different viruses/bacteria. To get a ********* claim on a label, a product has to meet certain criteria (control of various types of organisms) and only then will EPA allow the claim to be added to the product label.

Not EPA approved disinfectants are the same. Some are "disinfectant only" and others are both a "cleaner and disinfectant." The directions for use should specify which type of product you have and hence, whether pre-cleaning with a different product is required.

For a product to be efficacious, you MUST follow the directions for use especially contact time which means the surface must remain "wet" before wiping off excess material. In drier climates, a second application maybe required to ensure that the surface remains wet long enough to meet the required contact time.

Liquid vs. Wipes. In many cases, the liquid material is added to a physical wipe and voila - your wipe product. So does that mean that the efficacy on both products is the same? Probably not since the "wipe" requires a physical action which physically removes some material in addition to the disinfectant action.

Sorry to be so lengthy.

Personally I would focus on disinfecting the high touch areas (door knobs and stair rails) and the kitchen. I would require the movers to wear booties while in the house. Weather permitting, I would also have the windows open on move day.

Good luck!

no staircase in that house. Solves one problem.

I am going to ask them about booties. Even normally I prefer that people take off their shoes near the door. The only problem I see for the movers is they will be carrying heavy things from the truck into the house. So they cannot put on booties at the door, and if they are on at all times it defeats the purpose.
 

AxelAnnie

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I don't like hotels in general. Finding a used condom in in the coffee maker can do that for you..

I think I lots of blankets and pillows, a neighbor's driveway.
L
 

overedge

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TBH the main thing you would have to worry about in most hotels is the other customers, not what the hotel itself does to stay clean.

I stayed in a hotel last month and the staff were great. The main difference from pre-v*r*s times was that housekeeping did not come in at all during my stay - they only clean before and after a stay. Also the hotel restaurant and bar had limited service. However, a lot of the other guests were not observing social distancing, not wearing masks, and so on in the common areas. I felt very safe in my room but was a little cautious elsewhere.

FWIW I did a move and cleanout a few weeks ago. If you are worried about the movers and the v*r*s, then stay away from them in the house, or go away for a couple of hours if there's not enough room for you to social distance from them. And then wipe down the surfaces they might have touched. Like others have said, if it's a new house you don't have to worry about the v*r*s maybe being there from previous tenants.

Also, regarding booties. Like others have said, movers usually put a dropcloth on carpets to protect against dirt being tracked in. The movers aren't going to be able to safely walk around outside in booties, so if you insist on them wearing booties inside the house, they are going to have to take the booties off and put them on every time they go in and out of the house. That's going to increase the moving time a lot, and you are going to be paying for that time. So insisting on booties inside the house is going to be very expensive for you, and probably unnecessary.
 

Aceon6

Isolating from mean people
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Let’s also remember that the crud on surfaces thing got overblown a bit. Early on, they did a study on one of the cruise ships where 50% of the people got the crud. There was a lot of surface crud but one would expect that in a closed space with so many positives. More recent studies say that surfaces aren’t that common of a vector.

Concentrate on fresh air, distance from others, insisting on proper mask use, and hand washing. Yes, wiping things down might be good for your peace of mind, but it’s probably the lowest priority.
 

hanca

Values her privacy
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10,770
I don't like hotels in general. Finding a used condom in in the coffee maker can do that for you..

I think I lots of blankets and pillows, a neighbor's driveway.
L
Well, luckily I don’t drink coffee. Though I may not be impressed if I found the same in the kettle ... ;)
 

hanca

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I don't either but in a hotel room I drink tea by heating water in the coffee maker. So now I'm :eek:
My husband believes that if the water went through boiling, it should be safe to drink. My argument against that is that you could boil urine or a poop floating in the water, and even if it might be safe in theory, it still doesn’t mean I would want to drink it.

Though the coffee maker would be even less safe because the water there doesn’t get completely boiling, does it?
 

Japanfan

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I am just WTF is a condom doing in the coffee maker? Was it one of those so very exciting on the countertop trysts? :slinkaway

Missed out on that experience myself. Never joined the Mile High club, either.

Maybe next time round.
 

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